Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So lets say I have a class called Foo and another called Bar. Bar contains an instance of Foo and I have a function in Foo that takes Bar as a parameter. However, when I #include "Bar.h" in Foo to allow Foo to see Bar I get this error on the lines that Bar is referenced on:

error: ISO C++ forbids declaration of 'Foo' with no type

I'm guessing this is because both of the classes rely on each other to compile. Is there any way to get around this?

EDIT: Both of these classes have header files where the other class is referenced inside a #ifndef declaration.

share|improve this question
7  
If you have to include each other classes you should overthink your program design. Something is wrong here. –  juergen d Mar 12 '12 at 6:24
    
Consider what the output of the preprocessor will look like. Figure out what it should look like, and that's a huge step in telling which of the headers doesn't need to include the other. –  hvd Mar 12 '12 at 6:26
    
If a class body is not yet visible then you need to forward declare it. However, you cannot use the object of the class just with a forward declaration. You need to have class body visible to have its object. –  iammilind Mar 12 '12 at 6:26
    
@juergend Overthinking may be the problem, but is rarely the solution... rethinking, perhaps :) –  tmpearce Mar 12 '12 at 6:27

5 Answers 5

In Foo.h instead of including Bar.h you need to use the forward declaration class Bar;. Note that for this to work you need to take the parameter Bar as a reference or a pointer in Foo class.

share|improve this answer
    
In struct bar; struct foo { void frob(bar); };, bar doesn't have to be complete. Only when you need to define a member variable you need to have a complete type (otherwise compiler wouldn't be able to compute the size of foo). –  Cat Plus Plus Mar 12 '12 at 6:27
class Foo;

class Bar
{

};

and

class Bar;
class Foo
{
};

But this might be a result of a wrong design!!

share|improve this answer
    
A bunch of classes with no circularity could also be the result of a wrong design. Circularity does not stand out as a marker of bad design. –  Kaz Mar 12 '12 at 7:33
    
But isnt it something we try to avoid if we could? –  Rohit Mar 12 '12 at 7:40

You'll need to use a forward declaration for at least one class:

Foo.h:

#include "Bar.h"

class Foo {

};

Bar.h:

class Bar;

#include "Foo.h"

class Bar {

};

Also beware that you cannot easily reference members of Bar in Foo.h (they're not declared). So any inlined members that need Bar will have to go in Foo.cpp (or .cc if you prefer). You also cannot have a Bar as a value member of Foo.

So:

class Bar {
    Foo f; // OK. Compiler knows layout of Foo.
};

class Foo {
    Bar b; // Nope. Compiler error, details of Bar's memory layout not known.
    Bar *b; // Still OK.
};

This is especially tricky for templates. See the FAQ if you have troubles.

share|improve this answer

Use references or pointers for parameters and forward declarations. E.g.

//foo.h
class Bar;// the forward declaration
class Foo {
void myMethod(Bar*);
};

//foo.cpp
#include "bar.h"
void Foo::myMethod(Bar* bar){/* ... */}

//bar.h 
#include "foo.h"
class Bar {
  /*...*/
  Foo foo;
};
share|improve this answer

If the classes are so closely related, put them in the same header!

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.