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I'm trying to implement and train a five neuron neural network with back propagation for the XOR function in Java. My code (please excuse it's hideousness):

public class XORBackProp {

private static final int MAX_EPOCHS = 500;

//weights
private static double w13, w23, w14, w24, w35, w45;
private static double theta3, theta4, theta5;
//neuron outputs
private static double gamma3, gamma4, gamma5;
//neuron error gradients
private static double delta3, delta4, delta5;
//weight corrections
private static double dw13, dw14, dw23, dw24, dw35, dw45, dt3, dt4, dt5;
//learning rate
private static double alpha = 0.1;
private static double error;
private static double sumSqrError;
private static int epochs = 0;
private static boolean loop = true;

private static double sigmoid(double exponent)
{
    return (1.0/(1 + Math.pow(Math.E, (-1) * exponent)));
}

private static void activateNeuron(int x1, int x2, int gd5)
{
    gamma3 = sigmoid(x1*w13 + x2*w23 - theta3);
    gamma4 = sigmoid(x1*w14 + x2*w24 - theta4);
    gamma5 = sigmoid(gamma3*w35 + gamma4*w45 - theta5);

    error = gd5 - gamma5;

    weightTraining(x1, x2);
}

private static void weightTraining(int x1, int x2)
{
    delta5 = gamma5 * (1 - gamma5) * error;
    dw35 = alpha * gamma3 * delta5;
    dw45 = alpha * gamma4 * delta5;
    dt5 = alpha * (-1) * delta5;

    delta3 = gamma3 * (1 - gamma3) * delta5 * w35;
    delta4 = gamma4 * (1 - gamma4) * delta5 * w45;

    dw13 = alpha * x1 * delta3;
    dw23 = alpha * x2 * delta3;
    dt3 = alpha * (-1) * delta3;
    dw14 = alpha * x1 * delta4;
    dw24 = alpha * x2 * delta4;
    dt4 = alpha * (-1) * delta4;

    w13 = w13 + dw13;
    w14 = w14 + dw14;
    w23 = w23 + dw23;
    w24 = w24 + dw24;
    w35 = w35 + dw35;
    w45 = w45 + dw45;
    theta3 = theta3 + dt3;
    theta4 = theta4 + dt4;
    theta5 = theta5 + dt5;
}

public static void main(String[] args)
{

    w13 = 0.5;
    w14 = 0.9;
    w23 = 0.4;
    w24 = 1.0;
    w35 = -1.2;
    w45 = 1.1;
    theta3 = 0.8;
    theta4 = -0.1;
    theta5 = 0.3;

    System.out.println("XOR Neural Network");

    while(loop)
    {
        activateNeuron(1,1,0);
        sumSqrError = error * error;
        activateNeuron(0,1,1);
        sumSqrError += error * error;
        activateNeuron(1,0,1);
        sumSqrError += error * error;
        activateNeuron(0,0,0);
        sumSqrError += error * error;

        epochs++;

        if(epochs >= MAX_EPOCHS)
        {
            System.out.println("Learning will take more than " + MAX_EPOCHS + " epochs, so program has terminated.");
            System.exit(0);
        }

        System.out.println(epochs + " " + sumSqrError);

        if (sumSqrError < 0.001)
        {
            loop = false;
        }
    }
}
}

If it helps any, here's a diagram of the network.

The initial values for all the weights and the learning rate are taken straight from an example in my textbook. The goal is to train the network until the sum of the squared errors is less than .001. The textbook also gives the values of all the weights after the first iteration (1,1,0) and I've tested my code and its results match the textbook's results perfectly. But according to the book, this should only take 224 epochs to converge. But when I run it, it always reaches MAX_EPOCHS unless it is set to several thousand. What am I doing wrong?

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1  
In your diagram, the w14 arrow is mislabeled as w24. –  Gabe Mar 12 '12 at 6:48
    
I changed the learning rate to 19.801 (which is usually way too high) and reached the desired error in 300 epochs. I think they took another learning rate. But there could be an error in your code, too. –  alfa Mar 12 '12 at 10:58
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1 Answer

Try making rounding of gamma3, gamma4, gamma5 while in activation phase for instace:

if (gamma3 > 0.7) gamma3 = 1;
if (gamma3 < 0.3) gamma3 = 0;

and rise little bit learnig variable ( alpha )

alpha = 0.2;

learning ends in 466 epochs.

Of course if u make bigger rounding and higher alpha u set u can achieve even better result than 224.

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