Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

Here i want to create header which contains other file details like metadata of other files.

This code is works fine if i used static values for struct file_header

If i am using malloc for struct file_header than i am getting problem in this code.

Getting problem in fread. May be fwrite worked perfectly. code is here :

#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>
#include <fcntl.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <dirent.h>
#include <string.h>



char path[1024] = "/home/test/main/Integration/testing/package_DIR";

//int count = 5;

struct files {

    char *file_name;
    int file_size;
};

typedef struct file_header {

    int file_count;
    struct files file[5];
} metadata;


metadata *create_header();

int main() {
    FILE *file = fopen("/home/test/main/Integration/testing/file.txt", "w");
    metadata *header;
    header = create_header();
    if(header != NULL)
    {
        printf("size of Header is %d\n",sizeof(header));
    }

    if (file != NULL) {

        if (fwrite(&header, sizeof(header), 1, file) < 1) {
            puts("short count on fwrite");
        }
        fclose(file);
    }
    file = fopen("/home/test/main/Integration/testing/file.txt", "rb");
    if (file != NULL) {
        metadata header = { 0 };
        if (fread(&header, sizeof(header), 1, file) < 1) {
            puts("short count on fread");
        }
        fclose(file);
        printf("File Name = %s\n", header.file[0].file_name);
        printf("File count = %d\n", header.file_count);
        printf("File Size = %d\n", header.file[0].file_size);
    }
    return 0;
}

metadata *create_header()
{
    int file_count = 0;
    DIR * dirp;
    struct dirent * entry;
    dirp = opendir(path);
    metadata *header = (metadata *)malloc(sizeof(metadata));
    while ((entry = readdir(dirp)) != NULL) {
        if (entry->d_type == DT_REG) { /* If the entry is a regular file */

            header->file[file_count].file_name = (char *)malloc(sizeof(char)*strlen(entry->d_name));
            strcpy(header->file[file_count].file_name,entry->d_name);
            //Put static but i have logic for this i will apply later.
            header->file[file_count].file_size = 10;
            file_count++;

        }
    }
    header->file_count = file_count;
    closedir(dirp);
    //printf("File Count : %d\n", file_count);
    return header;
}

output :

size of Header is 8
short count on fread
File Name = (null)
File count = 21918336
File Size = 0

anybody please help me to solve out this issue.

Thanks

share|improve this question
1  
The lack of answers suggests that your question is not yet clear. What is the problem you are trying to solve? I am unable to make head or tail of your issue myself. – Jonathan Leffler Mar 12 '12 at 10:17
    
@JonathanLeffler thanks For your Reply. I will Post my Edited Question Please Wait for a while – user1089679 Mar 12 '12 at 10:26
    
@JonathanLeffler Please refer my Edited Question – user1089679 Mar 12 '12 at 10:36
    
@JonathanLeffler are u getting me? – user1089679 Mar 12 '12 at 10:51
2  
Patience is a virtue... – Jonathan Leffler Mar 12 '12 at 11:07
up vote 7 down vote accepted

You're working on a 64-bit machine because your pointers are 8 bytes long.

You're trying to write data out to a file and then read it back in. You're running into problems because pointers don't write very well. (More precisely: pointers can be written without any problems, but the pointers only have meaning in the current running program, and are seldom suitable for writing to disk and even more seldom suitable for reading back from disk.)

This part of your code illustrates the problem:

struct files {
    char *file_name;
    int file_size;
};

typedef struct file_header {
    int file_count;
    struct files file[5];
} metadata;


metadata *create_header();

int main() {
    FILE *file = fopen("/home/test/main/Integration/testing/file.txt", "w");
    metadata *header;
    header = create_header();
    if(header != NULL)
    {
        printf("size of Header is %d\n",sizeof(header));
    }

Side comments:

  • Make the file name into an argument to main(), or, at least, into a variable. Writing the name out twice makes it hard to change.
  • It is good that you are doing some error detection. However, I'm not going to critique it, though there is considerable room for improvement in it.

Main comments:

  • You see size of Header is 8 in the output because header is a pointer. The sizeof(metadata) (the type that header points to) is much larger, probably 48 bytes, but it depends on how your compiler aligns and packs data in the structure.

    if (file != NULL) {    
        if (fwrite(&header, sizeof(header), 1, file) < 1) {
            puts("short count on fwrite");
        }
        fclose(file);
    }
    

This code writes 8 bytes of data to the file. What it writes is the address where your header variable is stored. It does not write anything of the data that it points at.

What would get closer to what you are after (but is still not going to work) is:

        if (fwrite(header, sizeof(*header), 1, file) < 1) {
            puts("short count on fwrite");
        }

This will write 48 bytes or thereabouts out to file. However, your file won't contain the file names; it will merely contain the pointers to where the file names were stored at the time when the file was written. Be very careful here. If you read this file, you might even see it appearing to work because the names may not have been erased from memory yet.

To get the file names into the file, you will have to handle each one separately. You'll have to decide on a convention. For example, you might decide that the name will be prefixed by a 2-byte unsigned short which contains the length of the file name, L, followed by L+1 bytes of data containing the file name and its terminal NUL '\0'. Then you'd write the other (fixed size) parts of the per-file data. And you'd repeat this process for each of the files. The converse operation, reading the file, requires understanding of the written structure. At the point where you expect a file name, you'll read the two-byte length, and you can use that length to allocate the space for the file name. Then you read the L+1 bytes into the newly allocated file name. Then you read the other fixed-length data for the file, then move onto the next file.

If you want to be able to do it all in a single fwrite() and then fread(), you are going to have to revise your data structure:

struct files {
    char  file_name[MAX_PERMITTED_FILENAME_LENGTH];
    int   file_size;
};

You get to decide what the maximum permitted filename length is, but it is fixed. If your names are short, you don't use all the space; if your names are long, they may be truncated. Your metadata structure size now increases dramatically (at least if MAX_PERMITTED_FILENAME_LENGTH is a reasonable size, say between 32 and 1024 bytes). But you can read and write the entire metadata structure in a single operation with this.


Thanks for your reply but I am new in C so how can I achieve this thing?

Eventually, you'll be able to code it somewhat like this.

#include <dirent.h>
#include <errno.h>
#include <stdarg.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

enum { MAX_FILES = 5 };

struct files
{
    char *file_name;
    int file_size;
};

typedef struct file_header
{
    int file_count;
    struct files file[MAX_FILES];
} metadata;

static void err_exit(const char *format, ...);
static metadata *create_header(const char *directory);
static void release_header(metadata *header);
static void write_header(FILE *fp, const metadata *header);
static metadata *read_header(FILE *fp);
static void dump_header(FILE *fp, const char *tag, const metadata *header);

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    if (argc != 3)
        err_exit("Usage: %s file directory\n", argv[0]);

    const char *name = argv[1];
    const char *path = argv[2];
    FILE *fp = fopen(name, "wb");

    if (fp == 0)
        err_exit("Failed to open file %s for writing (%d: %s)\n", name, errno, strerror(errno));

    metadata *header = create_header(path);
    dump_header(stdout, "Data to be written", header);
    write_header(fp, header);
    fclose(fp);                     // Ignore error on close
    release_header(header);

    if ((fp = fopen(name, "rb")) == 0)
        err_exit("Failed to open file %s for reading (%d: %s)\n", name, errno, strerror(errno));

    metadata *read_info = read_header(fp);
    dump_header(stdout, "Data as read", read_info);
    release_header(read_info);

    fclose(fp);                     // Ignore error on close
    return 0;
}

static metadata *create_header(const char *path)
{
    int file_count = 0;
    DIR * dirp = opendir(path);
    struct dirent * entry;
    if (dirp == 0)
        err_exit("Failed to open directory %s (%d: %s)\n", path, errno, strerror(errno));
    metadata *header = (metadata *)malloc(sizeof(metadata));
    if (header == 0)
        err_exit("Failed to malloc space for header (%d: %s)\n", errno, strerror(errno));

    header->file_count = 0;
    while ((entry = readdir(dirp)) != NULL && file_count < MAX_FILES)
    {
        // d_type is not portable - POSIX says you can only rely on d_name and d_ino
        if (entry->d_type == DT_REG)
        {   /* If the entry is a regular file */
            // Avoid off-by-one under-allocation by using strdup()
            header->file[file_count].file_name = strdup(entry->d_name);
            if (header->file[file_count].file_name == 0)
                err_exit("Failed to strdup() file %s (%d: %s)\n", entry->d_name, errno, strerror(errno));
            //Put static but i have logic for this i will apply later.
            header->file[file_count].file_size = 10;
            file_count++;
        }
    }
    header->file_count = file_count;
    closedir(dirp);
    //printf("File Count : %d\n", file_count);
    return header;
}

static void write_header(FILE *fp, const metadata *header)
{
    if (fwrite(&header->file_count, sizeof(header->file_count), 1, fp) != 1)
        err_exit("Write error on file count (%d: %s)\n", errno, strerror(errno));
    const struct files *files = header->file;
    for (int i = 0; i < header->file_count; i++)
    {
        unsigned short name_len = strlen(files[i].file_name) + 1;
        if (fwrite(&name_len, sizeof(name_len), 1, fp) != 1)
            err_exit("Write error on file name length (%d: %s)\n", errno, strerror(errno));
        if (fwrite(files[i].file_name, name_len, 1, fp) != 1)
            err_exit("Write error on file name (%d: %s)\n", errno, strerror(errno));
        if (fwrite(&files[i].file_size, sizeof(files[i].file_size), 1, fp) != 1)
            err_exit("Write error on file size (%d: %s)\n", errno, strerror(errno));
    }
}

static metadata *read_header(FILE *fp)
{
    metadata *header = malloc(sizeof(*header));
    if (header == 0)
        err_exit("Failed to malloc space for header (%d:%s)\n", errno, strerror(errno));
    if (fread(&header->file_count, sizeof(header->file_count), 1, fp) != 1)
        err_exit("Read error on file count (%d: %s)\n", errno, strerror(errno));
    struct files *files = header->file;
    for (int i = 0; i < header->file_count; i++)
    {
        unsigned short name_len;
        if (fread(&name_len, sizeof(name_len), 1, fp) != 1)
            err_exit("Read error on file name length (%d: %s)\n", errno, strerror(errno));
        files[i].file_name = malloc(name_len);
        if (files[i].file_name == 0)
            err_exit("Failed to malloc space for file name (%d:%s)\n", errno, strerror(errno));
        if (fread(files[i].file_name, name_len, 1, fp) != 1)
            err_exit("Read error on file name (%d: %s)\n", errno, strerror(errno));
        if (fread(&files[i].file_size, sizeof(files[i].file_size), 1, fp) != 1)
            err_exit("Read error on file size (%d: %s)\n", errno, strerror(errno));
    }
    return(header);
}

static void dump_header(FILE *fp, const char *tag, const metadata *header)
{
    const struct files *files = header->file;
    fprintf(fp, "Metadata: %s\n", tag);
    fprintf(fp, "File count: %d\n", header->file_count);
    for (int i = 0; i < header->file_count; i++)
        fprintf(fp, "File %d: size %5d, name %s\n", i, files[i].file_size, files[i].file_name);
}

static void release_header(metadata *header)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < header->file_count; i++)
    {
        /* Zap file name, and pointer to file name */
        memset(header->file[i].file_name, 0xDD, strlen(header->file[i].file_name)+1);
        free(header->file[i].file_name);
        memset(&header->file[i].file_name, 0xEE, sizeof(header->file[i].file_name));
    }
    free(header);
}

static void err_exit(const char *format, ...)
{
    va_list args;
    va_start(args, format);
    vfprintf(stderr, format, args);
    va_end(args);
    exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
}

I compiled it as dump_file, and ran it as shown:

$ dump_file xyz .
Metadata: Data to be written
File count: 5
File 0: size    10, name .gitignore
File 1: size    10, name args.c
File 2: size    10, name atob.c
File 3: size    10, name bp.pl
File 4: size    10, name btwoc.c
Metadata: Data as read
File count: 5
File 0: size    10, name .gitignore
File 1: size    10, name args.c
File 2: size    10, name atob.c
File 3: size    10, name bp.pl
File 4: size    10, name btwoc.c
$ odx xyz
0x0000: 05 00 00 00 0B 00 2E 67 69 74 69 67 6E 6F 72 65   .......gitignore
0x0010: 00 0A 00 00 00 07 00 61 72 67 73 2E 63 00 0A 00   .......args.c...
0x0020: 00 00 07 00 61 74 6F 62 2E 63 00 0A 00 00 00 06   ....atob.c......
0x0030: 00 62 70 2E 70 6C 00 0A 00 00 00 08 00 62 74 77   .bp.pl.......btw
0x0040: 6F 63 2E 63 00 0A 00 00 00                        oc.c.....
0x0049:
$

I should probably have renamed err_exit() as err_sysexit() and revised the error handling so that errno and the corresponding string were handled inside that function, rather than repeatedly adding errno and strerror(errno) to the calls to err_exit().


Information from comments

Transferring some of the rather extensive commentary into the question:

I tried above code, but getting segmentation fault after File : 4, which means that the data write is working properly but I'm having some problem with data read. Nimit

I tried above code and I'm getting a segmentation fault while I am reading data from file. user1089679

Oops: valgrind is giving me warnings about an invalid write in release_header(). That would screw things up. It isn't hard to resolve, though — it is the second memset() in release_header() that's causing the mischief; I accidentally omitted the ampersand:

memset( header->file[i].file_name, 0xEE, sizeof(header->file[i].file_name));  // Broken
memset(&header->file[i].file_name, 0xEE, sizeof(header->file[i].file_name));  // Correct

This is fixed in the code. Note that both memset() operations are in the code to ensure that if memory is reused, it does not contain previous valid data, which was a risk given that the code was originally writing pointers out to disk and then reading them back again. The memset() calls would not be present in normal production code.

Note that odx is a home-brew hex dump program (Mac OS X does not have an hd program by default). Your system may already have hd for hex dump, or you could try hd or try your own Google Fu to find alternatives.

Just want to ask that, I want to run this program on cross-platform, so is there any problem with low bit machines? Nimit

There is no problem with this code on either big-endian or little-endian machines; there'd be problems if you take data from a little-endian (Intel) machine to a big-endian (SPARC, PPC, ...) machine or vice versa. The code is probably also sensitive to 32-bit vs 64-bit builds; I didn't define field sizes as n-bits but as convenient types like int which can change between systems. If you want portable data, decide on the field sizes (1, 2, 4, 8 bytes, mostly, at least for the non-string data), and then write it in a standard way - MSB first (big-endian) or perhaps LSB first (little-endian).

share|improve this answer
    
i will check your answer and please You can See my second question for what i am looking? stackoverflow.com/questions/9665917/… – user1089679 Mar 12 '12 at 11:08
    
Jonathan Leffler thanks a ton. Here first argument at a run time is filename where i want to write and second argument is path of directory? – user1089679 Mar 12 '12 at 13:08
    
@JonathanLeffler: I tried above code, but getting segmentation fault after File : 4 , means data write working properly but having some problem with data read. – Nimit Mar 12 '12 at 13:17
    
@JonathanLeffler I tried above code and getting segmentation fault while i am reading data from file. Problem in files[i].file_name = malloc(name_len); line . i debugged whole program. – user1089679 Mar 12 '12 at 13:57
1  
Upvote just for epic answer. – blueshift Mar 12 '12 at 15:48

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.