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This is my code :

protected IEnumerable<Hotel> Hotels;
protected Hotel Hotel;

Hotels = from Hotel hotel in new Hotels()
         select hotel;

Response.Write("RES " + Hotels.Count() + "<br />");
if (Hotels.Count() > 0)
{
    Hotel = Hotels.First();
}
Response.Write("RES " + Hotels.Count() + "<br />");
Response.Write("RES " + Hotels.Count() + "<br />");

Well, Hotels have 1 item on it. But the result it :

RES 1
RES 0
RES 1

Why? Seems that .First() make confusion with iterator? How can I fix it using IEnumberable? (without using another kind of list, I need IEnumerable).

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6  
How is Hotels populated & what is the underlying storage e.g. is it actually referencing a List<Hotel> ? –  Trevor Pilley Mar 12 '12 at 9:37
1  
The behaviour depends on what exactly Hotels is. If it contains some reference / connection to a data source which can change, then obviously the value can change between calls to Count, or if it is implemented with yield return it could be doing anything. Try calling ToArray() on it, and then doing your counts etc on the value returned from ToArray(), then you know you have a fixed snapshot of the collection. –  Foo42 Mar 12 '12 at 9:38
1  
It might be a problem with the actual implementation of Hotels. It works on Lists, for example. –  Botz3000 Mar 12 '12 at 9:39
1  
What class implements that IEnumerable? How do you initialize that Hotels variable? It works ok with lists arrays etc. By the way, you can use FirstOrDefault() extension method instead of that if construction. –  Dmitry Mar 12 '12 at 9:39
2  
Just tested it in a console app with a List, it returns 1, 1, 1 as expected. –  ken2k Mar 12 '12 at 9:39
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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted
static void Main(string[] args)
{
    IEnumerable<String> Hotels = new List<String>{"sdsfsdf"};
    String Hotel;

    Console.WriteLine("RES " + Hotels.Count());
    if (Hotels.Count() > 0)
    {
        Hotel = Hotels.First();
    }
    Console.WriteLine("RES " + Hotels.Count());
    Console.WriteLine("RES " + Hotels.Count());
}

prints

RES 1
RES 1
RES 1

As expected, how are you filling the enumerable and what type are you creating it as?

If you are filling this via an un-executed queriable you might get weird behavior like this as it will pick the first useage (ie First() in this case).

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I'm filling it with LINQ –  markzzz Mar 12 '12 at 9:42
    
can you post your linq statement?, also is this from a database directly? –  Luke McGregor Mar 12 '12 at 9:43
    
Check it out the updated question! –  markzzz Mar 12 '12 at 9:44
    
add a .ToArray() onto the end of your linq. This will force the query to populate to memory before the .First() which means it will be performed against .net objects –  Luke McGregor Mar 12 '12 at 9:46
1  
@markzzz: ToArray() executes an underlying LINQ query and returns a collection itself, so Count() will reffer always to the same list of items –  sll Mar 12 '12 at 9:50
show 6 more comments

No magic here. Looks like quantity of items in the Hotels collection changing in the time, perhaps some LINQ query with deffered execution, perhaps even LINQ-to-SQL.

Please show a full code which populates Hotels.

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Depending on the underlying implementation, re-enumerating an IEnumerable is not guaranteed in any way to return the same value. To see why, consider this example;

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    IEnumerable<int> bop = RandomSequence();
    Console.WriteLine(bop.Count());
    Console.WriteLine(bop.Count());
}

private static int _seed = 0;
static IEnumerable<int> RandomSequence()
{
    var random = new Random(_seed++);
    int randomNumber;
    while ((randomNumber = random.Next(100)) != 0)
        yield return randomNumber;
} 

This is a perfectly valid IEnumerable, and the two calls to Count() will evaluate to two different pseudo random values. The reason being that Count() re-enumerates the same IEnumerable and generates a completely different random sequence.

If you want repeatable enumerations, you will need to call ToList() or ToArray on the enumerable to store the results, and do all enumeration from the List/array which Enumerates the same way every time.

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The "First" method probably advances the iterator to point to the second element. Your first call to "Count" then completes the iteration on you one element sequence, and the subsequent call to count starts iteration anew. Count will always iterate the entire sequence, so it is idempotent. You need a way to reset the enumerator Hotels.Reset() after First() to make Count() behave correctly.

The simplest thing would probably be to make a Reset extension yourself, but I cannot reproduce your problem. If you have some system generated database iterator it is possible it would not reset automatically and you could use the code below. It just utilizes your own finding that a single Count() resets the iterator. And it would be O(n) to complete.

static class Extensions
{
    public static void Reset<T>(this IEnumerable<T> toReset )
    {
        if (toReset != null)
        {
            int i = toReset.Count();
        }
    }
}

But I cannot reproduce your problem:

Code below gives the correct result throughout. Have you written you own enumerator or collection?

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    var Response = System.Console.Out;

    var Hotels = new[]{1, 2, 3, 4};
    var Hotel = 0;

    Response.Write("RES " + Hotels.Count() + "<br />");
    if (Hotels.Count() > 0)
    {
        Hotel = Hotels.First();
    }
    Response.Write("RES " + Hotels.Count() + "<br />");
    Response.Write("RES " + Hotels.Count() + "<br />");

    Console.WriteLine( "Hotel: " + Hotel);
}
share|improve this answer
    
There is not a .Reset() method on IEnumerable, already checked :( –  markzzz Mar 12 '12 at 9:38
2  
No, it is on the enumerator. Which collection are you using for Hotels? -- I can't reproduce your error using an array. –  faester Mar 12 '12 at 9:40
    
markzzz, I suppose you use some strange object as your IEnumerable<Hotel>. Probably your own implementation that messes things up. –  Michal B. Mar 12 '12 at 9:45
    
I'm filling it with LINQ... –  markzzz Mar 12 '12 at 9:47
    
Then I think the underlaying data source changes over time and therefore different results... –  Michal B. Mar 12 '12 at 9:56
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