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I am writing a simple interface in Python for a simple database. The database is a simple database which stores which certain tracks where played at which event and by which artist. The interface in Python isn't yet the problem, though the design of the database is. I've come up with the following thing:

--- EVENTS ---

CREATE TABLE events (
  id INTEGER PRIMARY KEY autoincrement,
  event_name TEXT NOT NULL,
  event_date TEXT NOT NULL,
  <list of tracklist-ids - foreign key?>
);

--- TRACKLISTS ---

CREATE TABLE tracklists (
 id INTEGER PRIMARY KEY autoincrement,
 artist TEXT NOT NULL,
 <list of track-ids - foreign key?>
);  

--- TRACKS ---

CREATE TABLE tracks (
 id INTEGER PRIMARY KEY autoincrement,
 trackartist TEXT NOT NULL,
 trackname TEXT NOT NULL,
 timesplayed INTEGER NOT NULL,
); 

It just doesn't feel logical for me, I need way to many operations to get some simple things out of the databases, few examples:

  • Get a list of songs (tracks) played by artist A in the years 2006 till 2009: would require looping through the 'tracklists' table to get every tracklistid of artist A, then look it up in the 'events' table (which is already a pain, how to store a list?)

  • Lookup which artist played track A most of the times: loop through the whole 'tracklists ' table and get some sort of counter which looks for the trackid of track A

It might become a bit confusing because I'm talking about a lot of different things but to me it seems my database can be designed much better or should I use some kind of other approach to tackle this program database-wise? I'm looking for a basic start-off or hints/tips to get this database much more efficient and better. I know that not every lookup can be fast but to me this does not seem very efficient. Also, is there a better way of storing list into a SQL-database without having them to store them into strings?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I agree with Jens Schauder that you want to let the DBMS worry about filtering and counting, but I have to disagree that the list of tables is fine insofar as what OP is proposing isn't normalized. This is not a small issue, because it will prevent the DBMS from doing its job.

Also, importantly, the idea is not to keep a running tally of how many times a track is played, but to keep a record of every time a track is played. The difference is that what you want to store is a history of events, not a summary of events.

What you want are tables that look more like this:

--- EVENTS --- 

CREATE TABLE events ( 
  id INTEGER PRIMARY KEY autoincrement, 
  event_name TEXT NOT NULL, 
  event_date TEXT NOT NULL, 
); 

--- ARTISTS ---

CREATE TABLE artists (
  id INTEGER PRIMARY KEY autoincrement,
  artist_name TEXT NOT NULL
);

--- TRACKS --- 

CREATE TABLE tracks ( 
 id INTEGER PRIMARY KEY autoincrement, 
 trackname TEXT NOT NULL, 
 artist_id INTEGER, 
 FOREIGN KEY(artist_id) REFERENCES artists(id)
);  

--- PERFORMANCES ---

CREATE TABLE performances (
  id INTEGER PRIMARY KEY autoincrement,
  event_id INTEGER,
  track_id INTEGER,
  FOREIGN KEY (event_id) REFERENCES events(id),
  FOREIGN KEY (track_id) REFERENCES tracks(id)
);

This table structure is in third normal form (3NF) and will be easy to both write to and to query.

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Very interesting, some questions: if I have 10 tracks with the same name and three different artists it would still create 10 entries in the tracks table? Isnt this a waste of space? And secondly; you're linking event_id <-> track_id, has this some specific reason? –  wvd Mar 12 '12 at 15:53
    
@wvd - Linking event_id and track_is is like saying "This track was played at this event". The point is to make a note of the fact that something happened. You count up the somethings that happened after the fact, not while you are recording it. This is a much better approach for many reasons. Regarding your question about 10 tracks and three artists, I'm not sure I follow you. Do you mean three artists collaborated on 10 different songs or do you mean that 10 separate songs from 3 different artists were performed at an event? Can you give an example (even a made-up one)? –  Joel Brown Mar 12 '12 at 19:46
    
I understand how you think. Seems smart. I wrote down some entries in the tables here, the only problem is: artists can PRODUCE and PLAY tracks. With your method I can never say "artist X has played track A the most of the times". –  wvd Mar 12 '12 at 20:41
    
Edit: I can, I can just use the trackname for the full trackname (including artist) and use the foreign key artist_id as a reference to the artist who actually played the track at that event. Looks fine! Thanks! –  wvd Mar 12 '12 at 20:42
    
@wvd - If your model says that tracks don't "belong" to artists, then you just have to move the artist_id and FK from tracks down to performances. Then each performance of a song could be by a different artist and you could count and compare which artists play which tracks and how often. –  Joel Brown Mar 12 '12 at 21:03

At first glance you database looks fine with the single exception that you don't store a list of ids in one table, but a reference back to that table from the other table.

The looping you describe is in 99% of the cases done by the database using 'count' and 'join'

Databases are really good and fast at counting and looking up.

If you need detailed help how your sql statements should look like make them new questions.

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Thanks :), excited to see if perfomance is much better then I think it can be. –  wvd Mar 12 '12 at 9:50

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