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I saw some examples in java where they do synchronization on a block of code to change some variable while that variable was declared volatile originally .. I saw that in an example of singleton class where they declared the unique instance as volatile and they sychronized the block that initializes that instance ... My question is why we declare it volatile while we synch on it, why we need to do both?? isn't one of them is sufficient for the other ??

public class someClass {
volatile static uniqueInstance = null;

public static someClass getInstance() {
        if(uniqueInstance == null) {
            synchronized(someClass.class) {
                if(uniqueInstance == null) {
                    uniqueInstance = new someClass();
                }
            }
        }
        return uniqueInstance;
    }

thanks in advance.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Synchronization by itself would be enough in this case if the first check was within synchronized block (but it's not and one thread might not see changes performed by another if the variable were not volatile). Volatile alone would not be enough because you need to perform more than one operation atomically. But beware! What you have here is so-called double-checked locking - a common idiom, which unfortunately does not work reliably. I think this has changed since Java 1.6, but still this kind of code may be risky.

EDIT: when the variable is volatile, this code works correctly since JDK 5 (not 6 as I wrote earlier), but it will not work as expected under JDK 1.4 or earlier.

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you say that Synchronization would be enough if the first check was within synchronized block .... but I make the same check again after entering the synch block, so for sure the next thread will see the updated value of the variable. –  Mohammad Dorgham Mar 12 '12 at 11:21
    
Each thread may see a different snapshot, so the fact that one thread reads a variable inside a synchronized block does not mean that another thread which reads the variable without synchronization will see the same state. State will be consistent between threads only if they all use proper synchronization. As I mentioned, volatile takes care of that in your case from Java 5 upwards (i.e. volatile and synchronized not only cause a memory barrier each, but they also use the same barrier). –  Michał Kosmulski Mar 12 '12 at 12:23
1  
Just as a heads-up to future readers: the article linked above is way out of date and as the edit states, the technique works fine on JDK 5 which was released almost 10 years ago. –  Steve Pomeroy Oct 8 '13 at 14:45

This post explains the idea behind volatile.

It is also addressed in the seminal work, Java Concurrency in Practice.

The main idea is that concurrency not only involves protection of shared state but also the visibility of that state between threads: this is where volatile comes in. (This larger contract is defined by the Java Memory Model.)

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This uses the double checked locking, note that the if(uniqueInstance == null) is not within the synchronized part.

If uniqueInstance is not volatile, it might be "initialized" with a partially constructed object where parts of it isn't visible to other than the thread executing in the synchronized block. volatile makes this an all or nothing operation in this case.

If you didn't have the synchronized block, you could end up with 2 threads getting to this point at the same time.

if(uniqueInstance == null) {
      uniqueInstance = new someClass(); <---- here

And you construct 2 SomeClass objects, which defeats the purpose.

Strictly speaking, you don't need volatile , the method could have been

public static someClass getInstance() {
    synchronized(FullDictionary.class) {
         if(uniqueInstance == null) {
             uniqueInstance = new someClass();
          }
         return uniqueInstance;
    }
}

But that incurs the synchronization and serialization of every thread that performs getInstance().

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I did the synchronization after the if statement to reduce the cost of synchronization, so my question is why I need to make it volatile while I double check after entering the synch block? I mean synch will update all shared variables immediately, so the next thread will see the updated value of uniqueInstance –  Mohammad Dorgham Mar 12 '12 at 11:48
1  
@user1262445 As I said, without volatile a thread can see the object as partially constructed. So it will never enter the synchronized block, but return an partially constructed object if uniqueInstance is not volatile. I.e. you have 1 thread not entering the synch block and it might return garbage as another thread is right in the middle of the synchornized block. –  nos Mar 12 '12 at 11:53

You can do synchronization without using synchronized block. It's not a necessary to use volatile variable in it... volatile updates the one variable from main memory..and synchronized Update all shared variables that have been accessed from main memory.. So you can use it according to your requirement..

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