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For my header-only C++ library (lots of templates etc) I use GCov to check test coverage. However, it reports 100% coverage for all headers because the unused functions aren't generated by the compiler in the first place. Manually spotting uncovered functions is easy but defeats the purpose of continuous integration…

How does one solve this automatically? Should I just use "lines hit / LOC" as my coverage metric and just never reach 100% again?

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You can make unit tests that calls all public methods and functions. You will get coverage as well as test that it works at the same time. –  Joachim Pileborg Mar 12 '12 at 12:31
    
Yeah, but I want to easily spot if I missed a function, and it would be nice if I could just browse through my CDash and see a header with <100% coverage. –  pascal Mar 12 '12 at 12:57
    
I'm also after a good answer to this question. 1. I agree that it would be nice to see uncalled instantiations. 2. I've seen no results for member templates (in template classes), where I'm absolutely sure these are instantiated and called within my testing code (which is a bit weird). –  πάντα ῥεῖ May 30 '12 at 18:08
    
OK, as for my point 2 it was simply my fault. You need to instrument your test classes as well, as far THESE will instantiate the code. I'm using the Eclipse gcov (integration) plugin to inspect my test coverage results (lcov alternatively, didn't check results there), and not instantiated template code in the template will be easy to spot as having no annotations at all. I'll put this together in a comprehensive answer ... –  πάντα ῥεῖ May 30 '12 at 19:15
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Apart from the usual flags to GCC controlling inlining;

--coverage -fno-inline -fno-inline-small-functions -fno-default-inline

You can instantiate your template classes at the top of your unit test files;

template class std::map<std::string, std::string>;

This will generate code for every method in that template class making the coverage tools work perfectly.

Also, make sure that you initialise your *.gcno files (so for lcov)

lcov -c -i -b ${ROOT} -d . -o Coverage.baseline
<run your tests here>
lcov -c -d . -b ${ROOT} -o Coverage.out
lcov -a Coverage.baseline -a Coverage.out -o Coverage.combined
genhtml Coverage.combined -o HTML
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I'm also using GCov to check test coverage (Tests written with Google Test framework), additionally I use the Eclipse GCov integration plugin or the LCov tool to generate easy to inspect views of the test coverage results. The raw GCov output is too hard to use :-(.

If you have header only template libraries, you also need to instrument (using G++ flag --coverage) your testing classes that instantiate the template classes and template member functions to see reasonable GCov outputs for these.

With the mentioned tools it's easy to spot template code that wasn't instantiated with the test cases at all, since it has NO annotations.

I have setup a sample and copied the LCov output to a DropBox link you can inspect.

Sample code (TemplateSampleTest.cpp is instrumented using the g++ --coverage option):

TemplateSample.hpp

template<typename T>
class TemplateSample
{

public:
    enum CodePath
    {
        Path1 ,
        Path2 ,
        Path3 ,
    };

    TemplateSample(const T& value)
    : data(value)
    {
    }

    int doSomething(CodePath path)
    {
        switch(path)
        {
        case Path1:
            return 1;
        case Path2:
            return 2;
        case Path3:
            return 3;
        default:
            return 0;
        }

        return -1;
    }

    template<typename U>
    U& returnRefParam(U& refParam)
    {
        instantiatedCode();
        return refParam;
    }

    template<typename U, typename R>
    R doSomethingElse(const U& param)
    {
        return static_cast<R>(data);
    }

private:
    void instantiatedCode()
    {
        int x = 5;
        x = x * 10;
    }

    void neverInstantiatedCode()
    {
        int x = 5;
        x = x * 10;
    }
    T data;
};

TemplateSampleTest.cpp

#include <string>
#include "gtest/gtest.h"
#include "TemplateSample.hpp"

class TemplateSampleTest : public ::testing::Test
{
public:

    TemplateSampleTest()
    : templateSample(5)
    {
    }

protected:
    TemplateSample<int> templateSample;

private:
};

TEST_F(TemplateSampleTest,doSomethingPath1)
{
    EXPECT_EQ(1,templateSample.doSomething(TemplateSample<int>::Path1));
}

TEST_F(TemplateSampleTest,doSomethingPath2)
{
    EXPECT_EQ(2,templateSample.doSomething(TemplateSample<int>::Path2));
}

TEST_F(TemplateSampleTest,returnRefParam)
{
    std::string stringValue = "Hello";
    EXPECT_EQ(stringValue,templateSample.returnRefParam(stringValue));
}

TEST_F(TemplateSampleTest,doSomethingElse)
{
    std::string stringValue = "Hello";
    long value = templateSample.doSomethingElse<std::string,long>(stringValue);
    EXPECT_EQ(5,value);
}

See the code coverage output generated from lcov here:

TemplateSample.hpp coverage

Caveat: 'Functions' statistics is reported as 100%, which is not really true regarding the not instantiated template functions.

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