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I have some complex data which is used for application configuration in xml format. I want to keep this xml string in web.config. Is it possible to add a big xml string in web.config and get it in code everywhere?

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2  
Sounds like you want to use a Settings file? msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa730869(v=vs.80).aspx –  Yuck Mar 12 '12 at 12:20
    
nopes I want to have this xml string in web.config only.not in any other settings file or resource file this is my clients requirement. –  Gulshan Mar 12 '12 at 12:26
1  
The Settings values are stored in web.config. The Settings.settings file is used by the designer. –  jrummell Mar 12 '12 at 12:28
1  
It's your job to convince your client that they're doing it wrong. Using web.config as a place to dump other XML simply because it's the same type is a poor excuse. There's already infrastructure for working with data in a Settings file in a strongly-typed manner. See jrummell's comment. –  Yuck Mar 12 '12 at 12:29

4 Answers 4

If you don't want to write a configuration section handler, you could just put your XML in a custom configuration section that is mapped to IgnoreSectionHandler:

<configuration>

    <section 
        name="myCustomElement" 
        type="System.Configuration.IgnoreSectionHandler" 
        allowLocation="false" />

    ...
    <myCustomElement>
        ... complex XML ...
    </myCustomElement>
    ...
</configuration>

You can then read it using any XML API, e.g. XmlDocument, XDocument, XmlReader classes. E.g.:

XmlDocument doc = new XmlDocument();
doc.Load(AppDomain.CurrentDomain.SetupInformation.ConfigurationFile);
XmlElement node = doc.SelectSingleNode("/configuration/myCustomElement") as XmlElement;
... etc ...
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Probably this is what I looking for. –  Gulshan Mar 13 '12 at 4:28
    
Will u plz tell how can I read the "...complex xml..." as a string in my code? –  Gulshan Mar 13 '12 at 4:29
    
@Idorado, I added an example of reading the custom element using the XmlDocument class. –  Joe Mar 13 '12 at 8:20
    
Thank you Joe This is exactly what i was searching. –  Gulshan Mar 13 '12 at 9:18
    
@Gulshan: It's nice to reward this user if his answer solved your issue by marking the answer as accepted. –  JohnDoDo Dec 7 '12 at 17:11

There are several ways of achieving what you want (an XML fragment that is globally and statically accessible to your application code):

  • The web.config is already an XML file. You can write a custom configuration section (as described here) in order to fetch the data from your custom XML.

  • You can encode the XML data (all < to &lt;, > to &gt, & to &amp;, " to &quote;)

  • You can put the XML data in a <![CDATA[]]> section

  • Don't use web.config for this, but a Settings file as @Yuck commented

That last option is the best one, in terms of ease of development and usage.

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Is it possible to add an array of objects in settings file? –  Gulshan Mar 12 '12 at 12:39
    
Not an array, as far as I am aware, but you can add collections (there is a built in StringCollection, for example). –  Oded Mar 12 '12 at 13:11

The configuration sections in web.config support long strings, but the string has to be a single line of text so they can fit into an attribute:

 <add name="" value="... some very long text can go in here..." />

The string also can't contain quotes or line breaks or other XML markup characters. The data is basically XML and it has to be appropriately encoded.

For example, if you have XML like this:

 <root>
   <value>10</value>
 </root>

it would have to be stored in a configuration value like this:

<add key="Value" value="&lt;root&gt;&#xD;&#xA;  &lt;value&gt;10&lt;/value&gt;&#xD;&#xA;&lt;/root&gt;" />

Which kind of defeats the purpose of a configuration element.

You might be better off storing the configuration value in a separate file on the file system and read it from there into a string or XmlDocument etc.

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Well, it can be done easily in Cinchoo framework as below

Define a configuration object as below

[ChoNameValueConfigurationSection("appSettings")]
public class AppSettings : ChoConfigurableObject
{
    [ChoPropertyInfo("name", DefaultValue = "Tom")]
    public string Name;

    [ChoPropertyInfo("address", DefaultValue="10, River Road, Piscataway, NJ 08880 && New York")]
    public ChoCDATA Address;

    [ChoPropertyInfo("employer", DefaultValue = "<Sample>ABCD Inc.</Sample>")]
    public string Employer;
}

Couple of ways you can store and consume complex values from Configuration object. Either you can using CDATA or simple string object. In the above object, I've defined 2 members 'Address' of CDATA and 'Employer' as string (holds Xml string).

Once you have configuration object defined as above, it can be consumed as below

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    AppSettings appSettings = new AppSettings();

    //Modify the members
    appSettings.Address = new ChoCDATA("11, Oak Road, Woodbridge, NJ 08827");
    appSettings.Employer = "<Sample1>ZZZ1 Inc.</Sample1>";

    Console.WriteLine(appSettings.ToString());
    ChoFramework.Shutdown();
}

Define an object of 'AppSettings'. Access or modify corresponding members with new values as above. Vola, you can consume and store complex values in configuration.

Below is the snapshot of the configuration file

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<configuration>
  <configSections>
    <section name="appSettings" type="Cinchoo.Core.Configuration.ChoNameValueSectionHandler, Cinchoo.Core" />
  </configSections>
  <appSettings>
    <add key="name" value="Tom" />
    <add key="address">
      <value><![CDATA[11, Oak Road, Woodbridge, NJ 08827]]></value>
    </add>
    <add key="employer">
      <value>
        <Sample1>ZZZ1 Inc.</Sample1>
      </value>
    </add>
  </appSettings>
</configuration>

For more information, please visit http://www.cinchoo.com

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