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Operator Overloading with C# Extension Methods

How can i overload those operators, i feel misunderstood by the compiler.

I think the core problem is that i try to overload an operator as an extension to a class. The type class does not have those operators, so i feel pretty safe in doing so - but my compiler disagrees wildly.

    public static class TypeCheck
    {
        public static Boolean ToBool(this Type t1, Type t2)
        {
            //normal extension works
            return true;
        }

        public static Boolean operator > (this Type t1, Type t2)
        {
            //TODO once it compiles
            return fasle;
        }

        public static Boolean operator < (this Type t1, Type t2)
        {
            //TODO once it compiles
            return true;
        }

    }

To clarify the domain specifics of those comparisons: class A : B {}, class B {} and class C {} A is greater than A and greater than B but smaller than the rest. Because A.IsCastableTo(B) and A.IsCastableTo(A);

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marked as duplicate by cadrell0, Justin, jrummell, Matthias, Graviton Mar 15 '12 at 9:17

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2  
You find the answer here stackoverflow.com/questions/172658/… –  mimo Mar 12 '12 at 13:05
2  
I don't even understand how one Type can be > or < than another. –  cadrell0 Mar 12 '12 at 13:06
    
@cadrell0: You could read < as "is more narrow than" or "is more specific than", e.g., if class B : A then "B < A". –  dtb Mar 12 '12 at 13:08
2  
That does not follow how any other comparisons with < and > work. 17 is not more specific than 23. 1/1/2012 is not more specific than 3/1/2012. "ASDF" is not more specific than "QWER". Further what would C < B return when C is defined as class C { }. And if you tell me that should return false, then I would expect either C > B or C == B to return true. –  cadrell0 Mar 12 '12 at 13:13
    
I'm with cadrell0, what is the use case here? Something smells... –  Chris Lively Mar 12 '12 at 13:23

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Like the others have said, C# doesn't support extension operators. If you need to do this then you can implement a custom type, something like:

public class MyType : Type
{
    private Type internalType;

    public MyType(Type t)
    {
        internalType = t;
    }

    public static Boolean operator >(MyType t1, Type t2)
    {
        //TODO once it compiles
        return false;
    }

    public static Boolean operator <(MyType t1, Type t2)
    {
        //TODO once it compiles
        return true;
    }

    public override Assembly Assembly
    {
        get { return internalType.Assembly; }
    }

    public override string AssemblyQualifiedName
    {
        get { return internalType.AssemblyQualifiedName; }
    }

    public override Type BaseType
    {
        get { return internalType.BaseType; }
    }

    public override string FullName
    {
        get { return internalType.FullName; }
    }

    public override Guid GUID
    {
        get { return internalType.GUID; }
    }

    protected override TypeAttributes GetAttributeFlagsImpl()
    {
        return internalType.Attributes;
    }

    protected override ConstructorInfo GetConstructorImpl(BindingFlags bindingAttr, Binder binder, CallingConventions callConvention, Type[] types, ParameterModifier[] modifiers)
    {
        return internalType.GetConstructor(bindingAttr, binder, callConvention, types, modifiers);
    }

    public override ConstructorInfo[] GetConstructors(BindingFlags bindingAttr)
    {
        return internalType.GetConstructors(bindingAttr);
    }

    public override Type GetElementType()
    {
        return GetElementType();
    }

    public override EventInfo GetEvent(string name, BindingFlags bindingAttr)
    {
        return internalType.GetEvent(name, bindingAttr);
    }

    public override EventInfo[] GetEvents(BindingFlags bindingAttr)
    {
        return internalType.GetEvents(bindingAttr);
    }

    public override FieldInfo GetField(string name, BindingFlags bindingAttr)
    {
        return internalType.GetField(name, bindingAttr);
    }

    public override FieldInfo[] GetFields(BindingFlags bindingAttr)
    {
        return internalType.GetFields(bindingAttr);
    }

    public override Type GetInterface(string name, bool ignoreCase)
    {
        return internalType.GetInterface(name, ignoreCase);
    }

    public override Type[] GetInterfaces()
    {
        return internalType.GetInterfaces();
    }

    public override MemberInfo[] GetMembers(BindingFlags bindingAttr)
    {
        return internalType.GetMembers(bindingAttr);
    }

    protected override MethodInfo GetMethodImpl(string name, BindingFlags bindingAttr, Binder binder, CallingConventions callConvention, Type[] types, ParameterModifier[] modifiers)
    {
        return internalType.GetMethod(name, bindingAttr, binder, callConvention, types, modifiers);
    }

    public override MethodInfo[] GetMethods(BindingFlags bindingAttr)
    {
        return internalType.GetMethods(bindingAttr);
    }

    public override Type GetNestedType(string name, BindingFlags bindingAttr)
    {
        return internalType.GetNestedType(name, bindingAttr);
    }

    public override Type[] GetNestedTypes(BindingFlags bindingAttr)
    {
        return internalType.GetNestedTypes(bindingAttr);
    }

    public override PropertyInfo[] GetProperties(BindingFlags bindingAttr)
    {
        return internalType.GetProperties(bindingAttr);
    }

    protected override PropertyInfo GetPropertyImpl(string name, BindingFlags bindingAttr, Binder binder, Type returnType, Type[] types, ParameterModifier[] modifiers)
    {
        return internalType.GetProperty(name, bindingAttr, binder, returnType, types, modifiers);
    }

    protected override bool HasElementTypeImpl()
    {
        return internalType.HasElementType;
    }

    public override object InvokeMember(string name, BindingFlags invokeAttr, Binder binder, object target, object[] args, ParameterModifier[] modifiers, System.Globalization.CultureInfo culture, string[] namedParameters)
    {
        return internalType.InvokeMember(name, invokeAttr, binder, target, args, modifiers, culture, namedParameters);
    }

    protected override bool IsArrayImpl()
    {
        return internalType.IsArray;
    }

    protected override bool IsByRefImpl()
    {
        return internalType.IsByRef;
    }

    protected override bool IsCOMObjectImpl()
    {
        return internalType.IsCOMObject;
    }

    protected override bool IsPointerImpl()
    {
        return internalType.IsPointer;
    }

    protected override bool IsPrimitiveImpl()
    {
        return internalType.IsPrimitive;
    }

    public override Module Module
    {
        get { return internalType.Module; }
    }

    public override string Namespace
    {
        get { return internalType.Namespace; }
    }

    public override Type UnderlyingSystemType
    {
        get { return internalType.UnderlyingSystemType; }
    }

    public override object[] GetCustomAttributes(Type attributeType, bool inherit)
    {
        return internalType.GetCustomAttributes(attributeType, inherit);
    }

    public override object[] GetCustomAttributes(bool inherit)
    {
        return internalType.GetCustomAttributes(inherit);
    }

    public override bool IsDefined(Type attributeType, bool inherit)
    {
        return internalType.IsDefined(attributeType, inherit);
    }

    public override string Name
    {
        get { return internalType.Name; }
    }
}

Alternatively it would probably be easier to implement a custom DynamicObject (C# 4+) which can delegate the calls.

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There are no "extension operators" in C#.

At least one of the operator parameters must be the type the operator is declared in.

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You can overload operators in your own classes, but not in other classes via the extension method approach.

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You cannot define operators behaviors as extension methods.
You could do this the same way as DateTime works with Add() and Subtract(), that are implementable as extension methods if you can't modify the types implementation.

You could also inherit from the type (if possible), and define operators there.

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