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I am trying to measure the estimated cycle lengths it takes my computer to perform different operations, so I perform the same one for a 100K times and calculate the average. I am using loop unwinding to be a little more accurate: I perform 10 basic operations in each iteration and I increase my index by 10, resulting in fewer loop operations.

None of this really matter for my question: is there any way the compiler can understand I'm doing the same operation several time and only perform it once? Here's my loop:

for (i=0; i<iterations; i+=LOOP_FACTOR)
{
    result = -1;
    result = -1;
    result = -1;
    result = -1;
    result = -1;
    result = -1;
    result = -1;
    result = -1;
    result = -1;
    result = -1;
}

Also, I don't know if it matters - I am using Eclipse. I thought it might matter as there are different compilers out there.

share|improve this question
14  
Eclipse is not a compiler. –  KillianDS Mar 12 '12 at 13:14
    
Eclipse CDT + GCC, I assume? –  alternative Mar 12 '12 at 13:14
3  
Compilers can calculate the result and completely optimize away this loop (assuming LOOP_FACTOR is compile-time constant). –  visitor Mar 12 '12 at 13:19
    
Oh right I use ubuntu and the command is g++, so I'm guessing its gnome g++? –  yotamoo Mar 12 '12 at 13:21

4 Answers 4

up vote 15 down vote accepted

In GCC without optimization it's compiled as is:

(gdb) disas main
Dump of assembler code for function main:
   0x00000000004004e4 <+0>: push   rbp
   0x00000000004004e5 <+1>: mov    rbp,rsp
   0x00000000004004e8 <+4>: mov    DWORD PTR [rip+0x200482],0x0        # 0x600974 <i>
   0x00000000004004f2 <+14>:    jmp    0x400567 <main+131>
   0x00000000004004f4 <+16>:    mov    DWORD PTR [rip+0x200472],0xffffffff        # 0x600970 <result>
   0x00000000004004fe <+26>:    mov    DWORD PTR [rip+0x200468],0xffffffff        # 0x600970 <result>
   0x0000000000400508 <+36>:    mov    DWORD PTR [rip+0x20045e],0xffffffff        # 0x600970 <result>
   0x0000000000400512 <+46>:    mov    DWORD PTR [rip+0x200454],0xffffffff        # 0x600970 <result>
   0x000000000040051c <+56>:    mov    DWORD PTR [rip+0x20044a],0xffffffff        # 0x600970 <result>
   0x0000000000400526 <+66>:    mov    DWORD PTR [rip+0x200440],0xffffffff        # 0x600970 <result>
   0x0000000000400530 <+76>:    mov    DWORD PTR [rip+0x200436],0xffffffff        # 0x600970 <result>
   0x000000000040053a <+86>:    mov    DWORD PTR [rip+0x20042c],0xffffffff        # 0x600970 <result>
   0x0000000000400544 <+96>:    mov    DWORD PTR [rip+0x200422],0xffffffff        # 0x600970 <result>
   0x000000000040054e <+106>:   mov    DWORD PTR [rip+0x200418],0xffffffff        # 0x600970 <result>
   0x0000000000400558 <+116>:   mov    eax,DWORD PTR [rip+0x200416]        # 0x600974 <i>
   0x000000000040055e <+122>:   add    eax,0x1
   0x0000000000400561 <+125>:   mov    DWORD PTR [rip+0x20040d],eax        # 0x600974 <i>
   0x0000000000400567 <+131>:   mov    eax,DWORD PTR [rip+0x200407]        # 0x600974 <i>
   0x000000000040056d <+137>:   cmp    eax,0x3e7
   0x0000000000400572 <+142>:   jle    0x4004f4 <main+16>
   0x0000000000400574 <+144>:   mov    eax,DWORD PTR [rip+0x2003f6]        # 0x600970 <result>
   0x000000000040057a <+150>:   mov    esi,eax
   0x000000000040057c <+152>:   mov    edi,0x40067c
   0x0000000000400581 <+157>:   mov    eax,0x0
   0x0000000000400586 <+162>:   call   0x4003e0 <printf@plt>
   0x000000000040058b <+167>:   pop    rbp
   0x000000000040058c <+168>:   ret

But if you run with basic optimization (gcc -O) then it is shortened to one write:

Dump of assembler code for function main:
   0x00000000004004e4 <+0>: sub    rsp,0x8
   0x00000000004004e8 <+4>: mov    eax,0x3e8
   0x00000000004004ed <+9>: sub    eax,0x1
   0x00000000004004f0 <+12>:    jne    0x4004ed <main+9>
   0x00000000004004f2 <+14>:    mov    DWORD PTR [rip+0x2003fc],0xffffffff        # 0x6008f8 <result>
   0x00000000004004fc <+24>:    mov    DWORD PTR [rip+0x2003f6],0x3e8        # 0x6008fc <i>
   0x0000000000400506 <+34>:    mov    esi,0xffffffff
   0x000000000040050b <+39>:    mov    edi,0x40060c
   0x0000000000400510 <+44>:    mov    eax,0x0
   0x0000000000400515 <+49>:    call   0x4003e0 <printf@plt>
   0x000000000040051a <+54>:    add    rsp,0x8
   0x000000000040051e <+58>:    ret  

My testing code is:

#define TIMES 1000

int result, i;

int main() {
    for (i=0; i<TIMES; i++)
    {
        result = -1;
        result = -1;
        result = -1;
        result = -1;
        result = -1;
        result = -1;
        result = -1;
        result = -1;
        result = -1;
        result = -1;
    }
    printf("%d", result);
}
share|improve this answer
3  
It must be noted that any benchmark with optimisations disabled is invalid since it’s not an accurate representation of a real-life situation. Measuring cycle lengths of elementary operations should be done in assembly to be accurate. –  Konrad Rudolph Mar 12 '12 at 16:29
    
But I think that any optimisator will drop out multiply invocations of the same assigment (if they are one after another like in this). –  hauleth Mar 12 '12 at 16:32
1  
Yes. And that’s just too bad – you can’t benchmark such code reliably in C++. Luchian’s suggestion to use volatile also doesn’t work entirely since that will cause a “store” into memory, while a non-volatile code can work on registers only, which may be orders of magnitude faster. –  Konrad Rudolph Mar 12 '12 at 16:40
    
But what is the point of keeping it in compiled code? –  hauleth Mar 12 '12 at 16:47
    
What do you mean? Keep what in compiled code? –  Konrad Rudolph Mar 12 '12 at 16:53

It will probably optimize that code. If you want to profile the -1, then you should run with -O0. You should probably also generate some code without a loop to profile the individual instruction.

share|improve this answer

There's not much sense in profiling code without optimization.

Instead, I'd suggest declaring result as volatile.

As it is now, your code will probably be optimized to:

result = -1;

RESULTS

Both codes compiled with full optimization:

volatile int result = 10000;

00401000  mov         ecx,3E8h 
00401005  or          eax,0FFFFFFFFh 
00401008  jmp         wmain+10h (401010h) 
0040100A  lea         ebx,[ebx] 
00401010  sub         ecx,1 
    {
        result = -1;
00401013  mov         dword ptr [result (40301Ch)],eax 
        result = -1;
00401018  mov         dword ptr [result (40301Ch)],eax 
        result = -1;
0040101D  mov         dword ptr [result (40301Ch)],eax 
        result = -1;
00401022  mov         dword ptr [result (40301Ch)],eax 
        result = -1;
00401027  mov         dword ptr [result (40301Ch)],eax 
        result = -1;
0040102C  mov         dword ptr [result (40301Ch)],eax 
        result = -1;
00401031  mov         dword ptr [result (40301Ch)],eax 
        result = -1;
00401036  mov         dword ptr [result (40301Ch)],eax 
        result = -1;
0040103B  mov         dword ptr [result (40301Ch)],eax 
        result = -1;
00401040  mov         dword ptr [result (40301Ch)],eax 
00401045  jne         wmain+10h (401010h) 
    }
    cout << result;
00401047  mov         eax,dword ptr [result (40301Ch)] 
0040104C  mov         ecx,dword ptr [__imp_std::cout (402038h)] 
00401052  push        eax  
00401053  call        dword ptr [__imp_std::basic_ostream<char,std::char_traits<char> >::operator<< (40203Ch)] 

int result = 10000;

    for (int i=0; i< 1000 ; i += 1)
    {
        result = -1;
        result = -1;
        result = -1;
        result = -1;
        result = -1;
        result = -1;
        result = -1;
        result = -1;
        result = -1;
        result = -1;
    }
    cout << result;
00401000  mov         ecx,dword ptr [__imp_std::cout (402038h)] 
00401006  push        0FFFFFFFFh 
00401008  mov         dword ptr [result (40301Ch)],0FFFFFFFFh 
00401012  call        dword ptr [__imp_std::basic_ostream<char,std::char_traits<char> >::operator<< (40203Ch)] 
share|improve this answer
    
Why doesn't it make sense? Can you please be more detailed? Tahnks –  yotamoo Mar 12 '12 at 13:25
1  
Careful, his loop merely sets result to -1; it doesn't subtract -1 from result each time. –  Jeffrey Mar 12 '12 at 13:26
    
@Jeffrey yes, didn't see that. Corrected, thanks. –  Luchian Grigore Mar 12 '12 at 13:27
1  
@Jeffrey the keyword volatile is specifically designed for this purpose - remove optimizations that may occur on a specific variable. That's another reason I'm saying you should use it instead of removing optimizations for the whole program. –  Luchian Grigore Mar 12 '12 at 13:44
1  
Saying volatile removes optimisations is a bit misleading. What it actually does is request the compiler always fetch any volatile value from memory each time it is referenced just in case it's changed by another thread. Recent versions of the Visual C++ compiler have strengthened this by issuing memory barriers around volatile variable accesses. –  user420442 Mar 12 '12 at 15:37

It depends on the optimization level of your compiler. as such it can be optimized in a few ways:

  • the repetitions will be folded into 1 expression (via elimination of dead/redundant assignments)
  • the loop itself will be folded as it nothing changes between it doing 1 iteration or it doing 1000 iterates, thus it can be folded to a single instance of the inner expressions.

This gets a little more tricky if result is made volatile, which 'prevents' the compiler assuming that it's value will not change outside of the loop or sequence of expressions, it may even be enough to prevent the collapsing of the 10 inner statements into 1.

The best way to test this is to examine the output of the compiler, using something like objdump or a debugger.

share|improve this answer
    
@dbr: next time you edit an answer please make sure you don't eliminate half of it in the process... –  Necrolis Mar 12 '12 at 14:02
    
I'm pretty sure it originally meant to be "as such" so I've just gone ahead and changed it to that. Hope thats okay. [I know it was the author that made the last change, but heh, it seems like its just an application of the change that the guy who deleted half the answer made] –  alternative Mar 12 '12 at 20:38
    
@Necrolis huh, that's weird, sorry! –  dbr Mar 13 '12 at 13:00

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