Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

singleton B initializes singleton A. singleton A has no knowledge of B. How can we use A and be sure that B has done its initialization routine first?

B and A are in different assemblies and are maintained by different teams.

Trying to keep the implementations completely seperate.


The best answer seems to be just don't. Here's what I'm thinking thought:

kick off the initialisation via a registration class that implements a certain interface. If a DoSomething gets called, and T is in an assembly we haven't seen before, then we search for a class with the given IRegistration interface.

So... that would get rid of the dependency. It'd use reflection. We'd have to look up the types assembly home each time a method got called, but not too high a price to pay perhaps

share|improve this question
15  
pardon my... AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAH!!! –  Daniel A. White Mar 12 '12 at 14:03
2  
I can't believe that this is a good design you are having here... –  Daniel Hilgarth Mar 12 '12 at 14:05
5  
Oh boy... Singletons are the worst thing that happened to application design since... well, could be that they are the worst. I won't post a answer on this one, but you should try going with restructuring the app with DI / IoC. That way you'll be able to manage it cleanly, and make testing a breeze. –  Alex Mar 12 '12 at 14:07

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The level of coupling that your question implies leaves me in serious doubt as to the quality of your design.

  1. The answer to your problem is almost certainly not singletons. They should be pretty rare.
  2. If A has no knowledge of B, then there should not be any need for A to be initialized after B. Rather, B should be able to use A whether A is initialized first or during B's initialization.
  3. If you have to do this, DON'T use lazy instantiation. Do the initialization in a static constructor and make sure that you reference B before A in any code that needs both.
share|improve this answer
    
singleton use is rare. Thanks for the contstructive response. The static constructor approach is probably the best one. –  sgtz Mar 12 '12 at 14:26
    
I'm thinking about kicking off the initialisation via a registration class that implements a certain interface. If a DoSomething<T> gets called, and T is in an assembly we haven't seen before, then we search for a class with the given IRegistration interface. So... that would get rid of the dependency. –  sgtz Mar 12 '12 at 14:45
    
why do you suggest not using lazy instantiation? I'm wondering how Fluent goes about this? i.e. there's a core API, and the API needs to become aware of all decorated classes. –  sgtz Mar 13 '12 at 3:59
    
You needed a defined order of initialization. With lazy instantiation you delay initialization until the singleton is first used. If you don't use it, then it occurs when the class is first referenced. Avoiding lazy instantiation helps to avoid a bug where you think you have it initialized but you don't because you've declared it but not actually assigned the instance. –  tvanfosson Mar 13 '12 at 12:28
    
I don't fully agree, but there's some good advice here -- your comments crystallise a school of thought for me nicely. An anti-pattern to this though: messaging. Not necessarily a subject in conflict, but certainly okay for the agile / less monolithic project stages. I think I see your general point. –  sgtz Dec 5 '13 at 4:30

I would suggesting introducing non-singleton X that runs at start up and initializes both singletons in whatever order you need them, thus removing from the singletons the responsibility of knowing what order they should be initialized in (which is inappropriate for them to know, anyway).

From there, I would consider refactoring them both not to be singletons, and handing B a reference to A via constructor injection, since B evidently takes a dependency on A.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.