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I have an util.h/.cpp with an overload of operator>> for istreams which looks like

// util.h
//
// ... lots of stuff ...

std::istream& operator>>(std::istream& is, const char *str);
std::istream& operator>>(std::istream& is, char *str);

And

// util.cpp
//
// lots of stuff again
//! a global operator to scan (parse) strings from a stream
std::istream& operator>>(std::istream& is, const char *str){
  parse(is, str); return is;
}
//! the same global operator for non-const string
std::istream& operator>>(std::istream& is, char *str){
  parse(is, (const char*)str); return is;
}

in some other file I use this construct like this:

std::istream file;
char *x, *y;

// opening and allocating space for strings comes here

file >> "[ " >> x >> "," >> y >> " ]";

This worked perfectly well with gcc/g++ (v. 4.6.3) but now I wanted to use clang (v 3.0) and got errors stating, that the appropriate operator overloading can not be found:

clang -ferror-limit=1 -g -Wall -fPIC -o ors.o -c ors.cpp
ors.cpp:189:21: error: invalid operands to binary expression ('std::istream' (aka 'basic_istream<char>') and 'const char [2]')
   file >> "[ " >> x >> "," >> y >> " ]";
   ~~~~ ^ ~~~~
/usr/bin/../lib/gcc/x86_64-unknown-linux-gnu/4.6.3/../../../../include/c++/4.6.3/istream:121:7: note: candidate function
  not viable: no known conversion from 'const char [2]' to '__istream_type &(*)(__istream_type &)' for 1st argument;
  operator>>(__istream_type& (*__pf)(__istream_type&))
 [[ lots of other possible candidates from the stl ]]

Why is clang unable to find the appropriate declaration, while gcc has no problems. How can I fix this?

share|improve this question
    
Can you show us what you've #included in each file? Perhaps the g++ implementation is including another header that clang isn't. –  Michael Kristofik Mar 12 '12 at 14:15
3  
it is always advisable to post a small compilable code sample when You are asking questions about different behaviors from compilers. –  Alok Save Mar 12 '12 at 14:17
    
I'll try to get a minimal compileable example. –  hildensia Mar 12 '12 at 14:18
1  
I'm pretty sure the standard doesn't allow you to overload any operator only involving standard library or built-in types. That said, operators are located in namrspaces associated with the arguments. The only such namespace is namespace std which, indeed, doesn't have a shift operator overloaded taken the arguments you are passing. –  Dietmar Kühl Mar 12 '12 at 15:15
1  
It is impossible to even instantiate std::istream (it is an abstract class)... so ? –  Matthieu M. Mar 12 '12 at 15:24

1 Answer 1

Are you sure you're including util.h in the file where you do 'file >> "[ "'?

Without more detail it's difficult to tell what problem you're running into. For me clang compiles just fine with the following complete program:

#include <iostream>
#include <sstream>

std::istream& operator>>(std::istream& is, const char *str);
std::istream& operator>>(std::istream& is, char *str);

int main() {
    std::stringstream file("tmp");
    char *x, *y;

    // opening and allocating space for strings comes here

    file >> "[ " >> x >> "," >> y >> " ]";
}


// util.cpp
//
// lots of stuff again

void parse(std::istream& is, const char *str) {}

//! a global operator to scan (parse) strings from a stream
std::istream& operator>>(std::istream& is, const char *str){
    parse(is, str); return is;
}
//! the same global operator for non-const string
std::istream& operator>>(std::istream& is, char *str){
    parse(is, (const char*)str); return is;
}

Though you should consider doing this in some other way, because providing your own overloaded operator to override a standard one is not a good practice. The rules for lookup are arcane and code that abuses them will probably be difficult to understand and maintain.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, this minimal example compiles. So probably some other thing in our files magically obscures the operator overloading. The codebase is actually old, so changing this operator overload would break a lot. –  hildensia Mar 14 '12 at 11:47
    
@hildensia If you can provide a (small) program that reproduces the issue I may be able to provide a better answer. –  bames53 Mar 14 '12 at 16:09
    
I'll try to get an example, but it may take some time, since I'm occupied right now. –  hildensia Mar 14 '12 at 16:12
    
not an example, but some new information: clang can find the right operator if I use ::operator>>(is, "["); –  hildensia Mar 14 '12 at 16:58

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