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I call a class that creates a jframe and waits from user to input some values. The problem that I experience is that I need to wait these values before to continue. So the code is something simple like this

Jframe frame= new jframe(); //here I want the program to show the frame and then wait till   it will be disposed
// I want a pause here 
System.out.println(frame.getvalue);

Till now the only I could do is to froze the frame before can even appear totally. Any help? Please keep it simple since I am new to Java. THANK YOU!

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Thank you for the editing! –  Vagelism Mar 12 '12 at 14:25
2  
Why don't you wait for an on click event or something? Waiting an arbitrary amount of time to collect data from a box is a poor design approach. –  Max Mar 12 '12 at 14:28
    
Can't you use a listener on the textArea or xxx that the user is inputting data into, and have the relevant action be triggered once the input is done? –  assylias Mar 12 '12 at 14:29
2  
Are you looking for a modal dialog ? en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modal_window –  Barth Mar 12 '12 at 14:29

5 Answers 5

up vote 10 down vote accepted

I think you should use JDialog instead of JFrame. Please follow this example

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Link be dead, yo. –  D. Visser Jan 24 '14 at 14:23

What you're probably looking for is JOptionPane. This is a blocking routine that returns only after the user has entered some value, like so:

public class test
{
  public static void main ( String args[] )
  {
      String input = JOptionPane.showInputDialog(null, "Thing: ",
                    "Enter Stuff", JOptionPane.OK_CANCEL_OPTION);

      System.out.println ( "won't reach until got input");
      System.out.println ( "My value: " + input );
  }
}

The great thing about it is you can add Components to it, so you aren't limited to a single input field, but it is still blocking. The following would add two JTextField's to the frame:

public class test
{
    public static void main ( String args[] )
    {
        JTextField input_box = new JTextField(7);
        JTextField input_box2 = new JTextField(7);

        JComponent[] inputs = new JComponent[] {
            new JLabel("Thing 1:"),
            input_box,
            new JLabel("Thing 2:"),
            input_box2 };

        int rval = JOptionPane.showConfirmDialog(null, inputs,
                    "Enter Stuff", JOptionPane.OK_CANCEL_OPTION);

        if ( rval == 0)
        {
           System.out.printf ("%s and %s!", input_box.getText(),
                                         input_box2.getText());
        }
    }
}
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Instead of using a JFrame, consider using a JDialog with modality set to true.

When it comes time to add an 'OK' button or something like that, check out JRootPane.setDefaultButton()

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well as you know swing components are not thread safe though you can use SwingWorker to make the waiting in background,

It uses the thread way but it creates a new thread for the waiting ,long term operations in general, instead of pausing the event dispatch thread so the user can interact with the rest of the application or the rest of the application can continue to work while the waiting goes on.

ofcourse you have to define a way for it to stop the waiting.

check out its documentation here http://docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/javax/swing/SwingWorker.html

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This is what I do one week now reading about threads etc...I have achived since now to work with them only in the same frame but not to parents and child frames.Thank you! –  Vagelism Mar 12 '12 at 14:57
    
well i think SwingWorker does not concern this because in does not get called in the EDT rather than creates its own thread of execution and then appends the result on the EDT and returns the execution to the EDT. –  engma Mar 12 '12 at 16:15

This will cause the current thread to wait 5 seconds:

try {
    Thread.currentThread().wait(5000);
} catch (InterruptedException e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
}
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So what if the user for example needs 6 seconds to enter the data that I need to extract later? –  Vagelism Mar 12 '12 at 14:27
1  
So you don't want to wait, you want to know when the user is done entering data? –  Kylar Mar 12 '12 at 14:27
    
You'll need to add some kind of button or event listener to know when they are done. You should read the Swing tutorial. Especially the Event Listener bit: docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/uiswing/events/index.html –  Kylar Mar 12 '12 at 14:28
3  
Ummm ... this is wrong. wait(5000) means wait 5000 milliseconds for a notifiy, and can only be called if the current thread holds the mutex on the target object. If it doesn't then IllegalMonitorStateException is thrown. –  Stephen C Mar 12 '12 at 14:29
2  
Even if this were correct, it is bad Swing practice, and better recommendations are present. You might want to delete this answer. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Mar 12 '12 at 15:02

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