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I'm compiling conditionally:

#ifdef WIN32
  myVal = "Windows";
#elif __APPLE__
  myVal = "Apple";
#endif

Is there a value I can test within the __APPLE__ block to test against different versions (10.4,10.5,10.6 etc.)?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you're trying to check the compiler's environment, try uname -v.

Specifically, I think you can do uname -v | sed 's/Darwin Kernel Version \([^ ]*\):.*/\1/' to get, e.g. "10.5".

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You should use the /usr/include/AvailabilityMacros.h macros. See TN2064 for discussion, as well as the header comments in this file.

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This doesn't look like what I want, these are settings set by the developer, I want to know the OS of the machine it's running on. –  Tom Medley Mar 12 '12 at 15:17
2  
But @Tom, your question demonstrates detecting the OS of the machine your compiler is running on. You're checking compile-time macros. If you want the run-time OS version, then you need to write code that will be evaluated at run time, so #ifdef is off the table entirely. So, please clarify your question: Do you want to check the compiler's environment, or the program's? –  Rob Kennedy Mar 12 '12 at 16:09
    
Compiler's, sorry for the confusion. –  Tom Medley Mar 12 '12 at 16:24
    
So, this gives you what the developer requested on the machine that it is compiling on. Isn't that what you wanted? Asking for the actual machine OS isn't very useful if the developer requested a different SDK. –  Rob Napier Mar 12 '12 at 23:42

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