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I need to search for and mark patterns which are split somewhere on a line. Here is a shortened list of sample patterns which are placed in a separate file, e.g.:

CAT,TREE
LION,FOREST
OWL,WATERFALL

A match appears if the item from column 2 ever appears after and on the same line as the item from column 1. E.g.:

THEREISACATINTHETREE. (matches)

No match appears if the item from column 2 appears first on the line, e.g.:

THETREEHASACAT. (does not match)

Furthermore, no match appears if the item from column 1 and 2 touch, e.g.:

THECATTREEHASMANYBIRDS. (does not match)

Once any match is found, I need to mark it with \start{n} (appearing after the column 1 item) and \end{n} (appearing before the column 2 item), where n is a simple counter which increases anytime any match is found. E.g.:

THEREISACAT\start{1}INTHE\end{1}TREE.

Here is a more complex example:

THECATANDLIONLEFTTHEFORESTANDMETANDOWLINTREENEARTHEWATERFALL.

This becomes:

THECAT\start{1}ANDLION\start{2}LEFTTHE\end{2}FORESTANDMETANDOWL\start{3}INA\end{1}TREENEARTHE\end{3}WATERFALL.

Sometimes there are multiple matches in the same place:

 THECATDOESNOTLIKETALLTREES,BUTINSTEADLIKESSHORTTREES.

This becomes:

 THECAT\start{1}\start{2}DOESNOTLIKETALL\end{1}TREES,BUTINSTEADLIKESSHORT\end{2}TREES.
  • There are no spaces in the file.
  • Many non-Latin characters appear in the file.
  • Pattern matches need only be found on the same line (e.g. "CAT" on line 1 does not ever match with a "TREE" found on line 2, as those are on different lines).

How can I find these matches and mark them in this way?

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3  
bash would be a poor choice to implement this task, it can be done but the complexity would be high. Perl is very well suited to this job because it was created, in part, for tasks like this. –  msw Mar 12 '12 at 15:24
3  
The requirements are quite underspecified. What happens with CAT...TREE...CAT...TREE. The does the first CAT matches two TREE-s? Or does the second occurence of CAT intervene? Can two CAT-s share the same terminating TREE? Should the result be CAT\start{1}\start{2}...\end{1}TREE...CAT\start{3}...\end{2}\end{3}TREE? –  Kaz Mar 12 '12 at 17:22
1  
It’s really easy to do full, automatic UTF-8 processing in Perl, which lives and breathes regexes. I’d try it, although I don’t know the answer to the question @Kaz has posed. There’s also some question about what to do about graphemes with combining characters, because you can get some odd cases and I don’t think you want to match a partial grapheme. –  tchrist Mar 13 '12 at 0:58
2  
If the requirements were more specific, that'd be a pretty neat (and challenging!) golf question. –  louism Mar 13 '12 at 2:52
1  
I had a lot of fun finding a solution, but i came across an interesting point: for what do you need such a thing? :) –  p11y Mar 21 '12 at 12:56
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7 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted
+200

Check this out (Ruby):

#!/usr/bin/env ruby
patterns = [
  ['CAT', 'TREE'],
  ['LION', 'FOREST'],
  ['OWL', 'WATERFALL']
]

lines = [
  'THEREISACATINTHETREE.',
  'THETREEHASACAT.',
  'THECATTREEHASMANYBIRDS.',
  'THECATANDLIONLEFTTHEFORESTANDMETANDOWLINTREENEARTHEWATERFALL.',
  'THECATDOESNOTLIKETALLTREES,BUTINSTEADLIKESSHORTTREES.',
  'CAT...TREE...CAT...TREE'
]

lines.each do |line|
  puts line
  matches = Hash.new{|h,e| h[e] = [] }
  match_indices = []
  patterns.each do |first,second|
    offset = 0
    while new_offset = line.index(first,offset) do
      # map second element of the pattern to minimal position it might be matched
      matches[second] << new_offset + first.size + 1
      offset = new_offset + 1
    end
  end
  global_counter = 1
  matches.each do |second,offsets|
    offsets.each do |offset|
      second_offset = offset
      while new_offset = line.index(second,second_offset) do
        # register the end index of the first pattern and 
        # the start index of the second pattern with the global match count
        match_indices << [offset-1,new_offset,global_counter]
        second_offset = new_offset + 1
        global_counter += 1
      end
    end
  end
  indices = Hash.new{|h,e| h[e] = ""}
  match_indices.each do |first,second,global_counter|
    # build the insertion string for the string positions the 
    # start and end tags should be placed in
    indices[first] << "\\start{#{global_counter}}"
    indices[second] << "\\end{#{global_counter}}"
  end
  inserted_length = 0
  indices.sort_by{|k,v| k}.each do |position,insert|
    # insert the tags at their positions
    line.insert(position + inserted_length,insert)
    inserted_length += insert.size
  end
  puts line
end

Result

THEREISACATINTHETREE.
THEREISACAT\start{1}INTHE\end{1}TREE.
THETREEHASACAT.
THETREEHASACAT.
THECATTREEHASMANYBIRDS.
THECATTREEHASMANYBIRDS.
THECATANDLIONLEFTTHEFORESTANDMETANDOWLINTREENEARTHEWATERFALL.
THECAT\start{1}ANDLION\start{2}LEFTTHE\end{2}FORESTANDMETANDOWL\start{3}IN\end{1}TREENEARTHE\end{3}WATERFALL.
THECATDOESNOTLIKETALLTREES,BUTINSTEADLIKESSHORTTREES.
THECAT\start{1}\start{2}DOESNOTLIKETALL\end{1}TREES,BUTINSTEADLIKESSHORT\end{2}TREES.
CAT...TREE...CAT...TREE
CAT\start{1}\start{2}...\end{1}TREE...CAT\start{3}...\end{2}\end{3}TREE

EDIT

I inserted some comments and clarified some of the variables.

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Here is a Perl way to do it:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use 5.010;

# couples of patterns to search for
my @patterns = (
    ['CAT', 'TREE'],
    ['LION', 'FOREST'],
    ['OWL', 'WATERFALL'],
);

# loop over all sentences
while (my $line = <DATA>) {
    chomp $line;    #remove linefeed
    my $count = 1;  #counter of start/end
    foreach my $pats (@patterns) {
        #$p1=first pattern, $p2=second
        my ($p1, $p2) = @$pats;

        #split on patterns, keep them, remove empty
        my @s = grep {$_} split /($p1|$p2)/, $line;

        #$start=position where to put the \start
        #$end=position where to pt the \end
        my ($start, $end) = (undef, undef);

        #loop on all elements given by split
        for my $i (0 .. $#s) {
            # current element
            my $cur = $s[$i];

            #if = first pattern, keep its position in the array
            if ($cur eq $p1) {
                $start = $i;
            }

            #if = second pattern, keep its position in the array
            if ($cur eq $p2) {
                $end = $i;
            }

            #if both are defined and second pattern after first pattern
            # insert \start and \end
            if (defined($start) && defined($end) && $end > $start + 1) {
                $s[$start] .= "\\start{$count}";
                $s[$end] = "\\end{$count}" . $s[$end];
                undef $end;
                $count++;
            }
        }
        # recompose the line
        $line = join '', @s;
    }
    say $line;
}

__DATA__
THETREEHASACAT. (does not match)
THECATTREEHASMANYBIRDS. (does not match)
THEREISACATINTHETREE.
THECATANDLIONLEFTTHEFORESTANDMETANDOWLINATREENEARTHEWATERFALL.
THECATDOESNOTLIKETALLTREES,BUTINSTEADLIKESSHORTTREES.
CAT...TREE...CAT...TREE

output:

THETREEHASACAT. (does not match)
THECATTREEHASMANYBIRDS. (does not match)
THEREISACAT\start{1}INTHE\end{1}TREE.
THECAT\start{1}ANDLION\start{2}LEFTTHE\end{2}FORESTANDMETANDOWL\start{3}INA\end{1}TREENEARTHE\end{3}WATERFALL.
THECAT\start{1}\start{2}DOESNOTLIKETALL\end{1}TREES,BUTINSTEADLIKESSHORT\end{2}TREES.
CAT\start{1}...\end{1}TREE...CAT\start{2}...\end{2}TREE
share|improve this answer
1  
Nice. Definitely cleaner than my version. –  louism Mar 16 '12 at 2:47
1  
But this algorithm doesn't cover CAT...TREE...CAT...TREE properly, I'm afraid. –  Aleksander Pohl Mar 16 '12 at 9:14
1  
Also (although not mentioned in the description), if there are pattern elements that overlap, the pattern which is applied later won't be matched. –  Aleksander Pohl Mar 16 '12 at 9:25
1  
@AleksanderPohl: Not sure what must be the output for CAT...TREE...CAT...TREE. Edited my answer for it, not the same result than yours. Who is correct? I don't know. –  M42 Mar 16 '12 at 9:42
1  
Check the second (and third) comment for the question - I suppose that there is the right answer. –  Aleksander Pohl Mar 16 '12 at 9:51
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First, you have to find all the occurrences of start and end strings from your patterns. Then you need to find out which tags fit together (they do not fit if the end string comes before the start string or is at the same position and therefore touching). then you can generate your tags and insert into your output string. note that you need to add the number of inserted chars to your positions, because the length of the string is changing as you insert the tags. also, you must sort the tags by position before inserting them, else it would get very complicated to compute, how far you must shift the positions. Here's a short example in Ruby:

patterns = [['CAT','TREE'], ['LION','FOREST'], ['OWL','WATERFALL']]
strings = ['THEREISACATINTHETREE.', 'THETREEHASACAT.', 'THECATTREEHASMANYBIRDS.', 'THECATANDLIONLEFTTHEFORESTANDMETANDOWLINTREENEARTHEWATERFALL.', 'THECATDOESNOTLIKETALLTREES,BUTINSTEADLIKESSHORTTREES.', 'ACATONATREEANDANOTHERCATONANOTHERTREE.', 'ACATONATREEBUTNOCATTREE.']

strings.each do |string|
  matches = {}; tags = []
  counter = shift = 0
  output = string.dup

  patterns.each do |sstr,estr|                # loop through all patterns
    posa = []; posb = [];                     #
    string.scan(sstr){posa << $~.end(0)}      # remember found positions and
    string.scan(estr){posb << $~.begin(0)}    # find all valid combinations (next line)
    matches[[sstr,estr]] = posa.product(posb).reject{|s,e|s>=e}
  end

  matches.each do |pat,pos|                   # loop through all matches
    pos.each do |s,e|                         # 
      tags << [s,"\\start{#{counter += 1}}"]  # generate and remember \start{}
      tags << [e,"\\end{#{counter}}"]         # and \end{} tags
    end
  end

  tags.sort.each do |pos,tag|                 # sort and loop through tags
    output.insert(pos+shift,tag)              # insert tag and increment
    shift += tag.chars.count                  # shift by num. of inserted chars
  end

  puts string, output                         # print result
end

It's not pretty, but it meets all your requirements. The next Example is a bit more readable and reusable i think and it is realized as a Ruby class with corresponding Unit Tests to ensure it works:

class PatternMarker
  require 'english'

  attr_reader :input, :output, :matches

  def initialize patterns
    @patterns = patterns
    raise ArgumentError, 'no patterns given' unless @patterns.any?
    @patterns.each do |p|
      raise ArgumentError, 'every pattern must have exactly two strings' unless p.count == 2
    end
  end

  def parse input
    @input = input.dup
    match_patterns
    generate_output
    self
  end

  def match?
    @matches.any?
  end

private

  def match_patterns
    @matches = {}
    @patterns.each do |start_str,end_str|
      pos = { :start => [], :end => [] }
      @input.scan(start_str){ pos[:start] << $LAST_MATCH_INFO.end(0)   }
      @input.scan(end_str  ){ pos[:end]   << $LAST_MATCH_INFO.begin(0) }
      @matches[[start_str,end_str]] = pos[:start].product(pos[:end])
      @matches[[start_str,end_str]].reject!{ |s,e| e <= s }
      @matches.reject!{ |p,pos| pos.none? }
    end
  end

  def generate_output
    tags = []
    counter = shift = 0
    @output = @input.dup

    @matches.each do |pattern,positions|
      positions.each do |s,e|
        counter += 1
        tags << [s, "\\start{#{counter}}"]
        tags << [e, "\\end{#{counter}}"  ]
      end
    end

    tags.sort!.each do |position,tag|
      @output.insert(position+shift,tag)
      shift += tag.chars.count
    end
  end
end

in action:

patterns = [
  ['CAT' , 'TREE'     ],
  ['LION', 'FOREST'   ],
  ['OWL' , 'WATERFALL']
]

strings = [
  'THEREISACATINTHETREE.',
  'THETREEHASACAT.',
  'THECATTREEHASMANYBIRDS.',
  'THECATANDLIONLEFTTHEFORESTANDMETANDOWLINTREENEARTHEWATERFALL.',
  'THECATDOESNOTLIKETALLTREES,BUTINSTEADLIKESSHORTTREES.',
  'ACATONATREEANDANOTHERCATONANOTHERTREE.',
  'ACATONATREEBUTNOCATTREE.'
]

marker = PatternMarker.new(patterns)

strings.each do |string|
  marker.parse(string)

  puts "input: #{marker.input}"

  if marker.match?
    puts "output: #{marker.output}"
  else
    puts "(does not match)"
  end
  puts
end

output:

input: THEREISACATINTHETREE.
output: THEREISACAT\start{1}INTHE\end{1}TREE.

input: THETREEHASACAT.
(does not match)

input: THECATTREEHASMANYBIRDS.
(does not match)

input: THECATANDLIONLEFTTHEFORESTANDMETANDOWLINTREENEARTHEWATERFALL.
output: THECAT\start{1}ANDLION\start{2}LEFTTHE\end{2}FORESTANDMETANDOWL\start{3}IN\end{1}TREENEARTHE\end{3}WATERFALL.

input: THECATDOESNOTLIKETALLTREES,BUTINSTEADLIKESSHORTTREES.
output: THECAT\start{1}\start{2}DOESNOTLIKETALL\end{1}TREES,BUTINSTEADLIKESSHORT\end{2}TREES.

input: ACATONATREEANDANOTHERCATONANOTHERTREE.
output: ACAT\start{1}\start{2}ONA\end{1}TREEANDANOTHERCAT\start{3}ONANOTHER\end{2}\end{3}TREE.

input: ACATONATREEBUTNOCATTREE.
output: ACAT\start{1}\start{2}ONA\end{1}TREEBUTNOCAT\end{2}TREE.

tests:

require 'test/unit'

class TestPatternMarker < Test::Unit::TestCase
  def setup
    @patterns = [
      ['CAT' , 'TREE'     ],
      ['LION', 'FOREST'   ],
      ['OWL' , 'WATERFALL']
    ]

    @marker = PatternMarker.new(@patterns)
  end

  def test_should_parse_simple
    @marker.parse 'THEREISACATINTHETREE.'
    assert @marker.match?
    assert_equal 'THEREISACAT\start{1}INTHE\end{1}TREE.', @marker.output
  end

  def test_should_parse_reverse
    @marker.parse 'THETREEHASACAT.'
    assert !@marker.match?
    assert_equal @marker.input, @marker.output
  end

  def test_should_parse_touching
    @marker.parse 'THECATTREEHASMANYBIRDS.'
    assert !@marker.match?
    assert_equal @marker.input, @marker.output
  end

  def test_should_parse_multiple_patterns
    @marker.parse 'THECATANDLIONLEFTTHEFORESTANDMETANDOWLINATREENEARTHEWATERFALL.'
    assert @marker.match?
    assert_equal 'THECAT\start{1}ANDLION\start{2}LEFTTHE\end{2}FORESTANDMETANDOWL\start{3}INA\end{1}TREENEARTHE\end{3}WATERFALL.', @marker.output
  end

  def test_should_mark_multiple_matches_at_same_place
    @marker.parse 'THECATDOESNOTLIKETALLTREES,BUTINSTEADLIKESSHORTTREES.'
    assert @marker.match?
    assert_equal 'THECAT\start{1}\start{2}DOESNOTLIKETALL\end{1}TREES,BUTINSTEADLIKESSHORT\end{2}TREES.', @marker.output
  end

  def test_should_mark_all_possible_matches
    @marker.parse 'CATFOOTREEFOOCATFOOTREE.'
    assert @marker.match?
    assert_equal 'CAT\start{1}\start{2}FOO\end{1}TREEFOOCAT\start{3}FOO\end{2}\end{3}TREE.', @marker.output
  end

  def test_should_accept_input
    @marker.parse 'CATINTREE'
    assert @marker.match?
    assert_equal 'CATINTREE', @marker.input
    @marker.parse 'FOOBAR'
    assert !@marker.match?
    assert_equal 'FOOBAR', @marker.input
  end

  def test_should_only_accept_valid_patterns
    assert_raise ArgumentError do PatternMarker.new([])                                end
    assert_raise ArgumentError do PatternMarker.new(['FOO','BAR'])                     end
    assert_raise ArgumentError do PatternMarker.new(['FOO','BAR'],['FOO','BAR','BAZ']) end
    assert_raise ArgumentError do PatternMarker.new(['FOO','BAR'],['BAZ'])             end
    assert_nothing_raised      do PatternMarker.new([['FOO','BAR']])                   end
  end
end

test output:

Loaded suite pattern
Started
........
Finished in 0.003910 seconds.

8 tests, 21 assertions, 0 failures, 0 errors, 0 skips

Test run options: --seed 31173

edit: added tests and simplified some of the code

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Here's a partial answer. It fits all your requirements except the last one, which has no single simple solution. I'll leave that one for you to figure out :-)

I chose a rule-based approach instead of regular expressions. I have found in previous similar projects that simple rule-based parsers are more easily maintainable, portable and generally faster than regular expressions. I haven't used any truly Ruby-specific features here, so it should be easily portable to Python or Perl. It should even be portable to C without much effort.

patterns = [
  ['CAT', 'TREE'],
  ['LION', 'FOREST'],
  ['OWL', 'WATERFALL']
]

lines = [
  'THEREISACATINTHETREE.',
  'THETREEHASACAT.',
  'THECATTREEHASMANYBIRDS.',
  'THECATANDLIONLEFTTHEFORESTANDMETANDOWLINTREENEARTHEWATERFALL.',
  'THECATDOESNOTLIKETALLTREES,BUTINSTEADLIKESSHORTTREES.'
]

newlines = []

START_TAG_LENGTH = 9
END_TAG_LENGTH = 7

lines.each do |line|

  newline = line.dup
  before = {}
  n = 1

  patterns.each do |pair|

    a = 0

    matches = [[], []]
    len = pair[0].length

    pair.each do |pattern|
      b = 0
      while (c = line.index(pattern, b))
        matches[a] << c
        b = c + 1
      end
      break if b == 0 && a > 0
      a += 1
    end

    matches[0].each_with_index do |d, f|
      bd = 0; be = 0
      e = matches[1][f]
      next if (d > e) || (d + len == e)
      d = d + len
      before.each { |g, h| bd += h if g <= d }
      newline.insert(d + bd, "\\start{#{n}}")
      before[d] ||= 0
      before[d] += START_TAG_LENGTH
      before.each { |g, h| be += h if g <= e }
      newline.insert(e + be, "\\end{#{n}}")
      before[e] ||= 0
      before[e] += END_TAG_LENGTH
    end

    n += 1

  end

  newlines << newline

end

puts newlines

Output:

THEREISACAT\start{1}INTHE\end{1}TREE.
THETREEHASACAT.
THECATTREEHASMANYBIRDS.
THECAT\start{1}ANDLION\start{2}LEFTTHE\end{2}FORESTANDMETANDOWL\start{3}IN\end{1}TREENEARTHE\end{3}WATERFALL.
THECAT\start{1}DOESNOTLIKETALL\end{1}TREES,BUTINSTEADLIKESSHORTTREES.

Notice it failed on the last one. That should give you a good head start, though. If you need help figuring out what some of the code does, don't hesitate.

On a side note, just being curious, what are you using this for?

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Here is my solution in the sadly not very popular Python.

patterns = [u'CAT,TREE', u'LION,FOREST', u'OWL,WATERFALL']

strings = [u'THEREISACATINTHETREE.',
           u'THETREEHASACAT.',
           u'THECATTREEHASMANYBIRDS.',
           u'THECATANDLIONLEFTTHEFORESTANDMETANDOWLINTREENEARTHEWATERFALL.',
           u'THECATDOESNOTLIKETALLTREES,BUTINSTEADLIKESSHORTTREES.',
           u'ACATONATREEANDANOTHERCATONANOTHERTREE.',
           u'ACATONATREEBUTNOCATTREE.' ]

def findMatch(needles, haystack, label):
    needles = needles.split(',')
    matches = haystack.split(needles[0])

    if len(matches) > 1:
        submatches = matches[1].split(needles[1])

        if len(submatches) > 1:
            return u''.join([matches[0], needles[0], u'\\start{'+label+'}', submatches[0], u'\\end{'+label+'}', needles[1], submatches[1]])

    return False

for s in strings:
    i = 0
    res = s
    for pat in patterns:
        i = i + 1
        temp = findMatch(pat, res, str(i))

        if (temp):
            res = temp

    print ('searching in '+s+' yields '+res).encode('utf-8')
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Here's one entirely in bash (no external commands). Not too hard! It expects the input lines on stdin.

#/bin/bash

words=("CAT TREE" "LION FORREST" "OWL WATERFALL")

function doit () {
  if [[ "$line" =~ (.*)$word1(.*)$word2(.*) ]]; then
    line="${BASH_REMATCH[1]}$alt_w1\\start{$count}${BASH_REMATCH[2]}$word2\\end{$count}${BASH_REMATCH[3]}"
    (( count += 1 ))
    doit
  elif [[ "$line" =~ $alt_w1 ]]; then
    line=${line//$alt_w1/$word1}
    [[ "$line" =~ (.*)$word2(.*) ]]
    line="${BASH_REMATCH[1]}$alt_w2${BASH_REMATCH[2]}"
    doit
  elif [[ "$line" =~ $alt_w2 ]]; then
    line=${line//$alt_w2/$word2}
  fi
}

while read line; do
  count=1
  for pair in "${words[@]}"; do
    word1=${pair% *}
    word2=${pair#* }
    alt_w1="${word1:0:1}XYZZYX${word1:1}"
    alt_w2="${word2:0:1}XYZZYX${word2:1}"
    doit
  done
  echo "$line"
done

Assumptions:

  1. The text will never contain "XYZZYX" (the string can be changed).
  2. The words will never contain characters used in regular expressions.
    • e.g. . * [ ] ^ $ +
    • (it's ok for those to be in the lines).
  3. The words will always be at least two characters long.
  4. The words will never be substrings of other words you're searching for.
    • e.g. cat and cattle.
    • Actually, this might work, but the result would be confusing as hell.
share|improve this answer
    
What characters used in regular expressions cannot appear? Is that a problem if any of those characters used in regular expressions appears in the input lines? What is the meaning of, "The words will never be substrings of other words?" –  Village Mar 21 '12 at 21:46
1  
By 'never be substrings of other words', he means that if you want to match 'cat' you'll also match 'cattle' and so on. This is unavoidable if you don't have word separators. –  jimw Mar 22 '12 at 1:09
1  
Right, and if you want to match both "cattle" and "cat", you'll either get "cat\start{2}tle\start{1}", or just "cat\start{1}tle", depending on which you search for first. –  ams Mar 22 '12 at 12:53
1  
I've edited the answer to clarify your points. –  ams Mar 22 '12 at 12:55
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Here is my PERL approach. It is quick and dirty.

It maybe much better if I had used Marpa for parsing not regexps.

Anyway, it do the job.

use strict;
use Test::More;
use Data::Dumper;

# patterns to search for
my @patterns = (
    'CAT,TREE',
    'LION,FOREST',
    'OWL,WATERFALL',
);
#lines
my @lines = qw(
THEREISACATINTHETREE.
THETREEHASACAT.
THECATTREEHASMANYBIRDS.
THECATANDLIONLEFTTHEFORESTANDMETANDOWLINATREENEARTHEWATERFALL.
THECATDOESNOTLIKETALLTREES,BUTINSTEADLIKESSHORTTREES.
THECATDOESNOTLIKETALLTREES,BUTINSTEADLIKESSHORTTREESORBIGTREES.
);


my @expected_output = (
'THEREISACAT\start{1}INTHE\end{1}TREE.',
'Does not Match',
'Does not Match',
'THECAT\start{1}ANDLION\start{2}LEFTTHE\end{2}FORESTANDMETANDOWL\start{3}INA\end{1}TREENEARTHE\end{3}WATERFALL.',
'THECAT\start{1}\start{2}DOESNOTLIKETALL\end{1}TREES,BUTINSTEADLIKESSHORT\end{2}TREES.',
'THECAT\start{1}\start{2}\start{3}DOESNOTLIKETALL\end{1}TREES,BUTINSTEADLIKESSHORT\end{2}TREESORBIG\end{3}TREES.',
);

#is(check_line($lines[0]),$expected_output[0]);die;

my $no=0;
for(my $i=0;$i<scalar(@lines );$i++){   
    is(check_line($lines[$i]),$expected_output[$i]);
    $no++;
}
done_testing( $no );

sub check_line{
    my $in      = shift;
    my $out = '';
    my $match = 1;
    foreach my $pattern_line (@patterns){
        my ($first,$second) = split(/,/,$pattern_line);
        #warn "$first,$second,$in\n";
        if ($in !~ m#$first.+?$second#is){
            next;
        }
        #matched    

        while ($in =~ s#($first)(.+?)($second)#$1\\start\{$match\}$2\\end\{$match\}_SECOND_#is){
            $match++;
            #warn "Found match: $match\n";
        }
        $in =~ s#_SECOND_#$second#gis;
        #$in =~ s#\\start\{(\d+)\}\\start\{(\d+)\}#\\start\{$2\}\\start\{$1\}#gis;
        my ($end,$start) = $in =~ m#\\start\{(\d+)\}(?:\\start\{(\d+)\})+#gis;

        my $stmp = join("",map {"\\start\{$_\}"} ($start..$end));
        #print Dumper($in,$start,$end,$stmp);
        $in =~ s#\\start\{($end)\}.*?\\start\{($start)\}#$stmp#is;


    }
    return 'Does not Match' if $match ==1;
    $out = $in;
    return $out;
}
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2  
Hi, If you downvote my solution, would you mind to comment, why? –  user1126070 Mar 22 '12 at 7:56
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