Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I don't understand something regarding the public static Strings. I have a couple of variables that need to be accessed globaly (I know that that is not the true OO approach). If I pass the "reference" of public static String str from Globals class, any change made to the value in SomeClass will not update that variable.

    public class Globals{

    public static String str;

    }

    public class SomeClass{

    private String str;

    public void setStr(String str){
        this.str = str; 
        //If I change the value of str in this SomeClass, the value does not get
        //updated for the public static String str in Globals class
    }

//Here assign new value for str

    }
share|improve this question
4  
Why would you imagine that the two str fields (the one in Globals and the one in SomeClass) were related? Can you give us your setStr() invocation as well? –  Alexander Pavlov Mar 12 '12 at 15:42

7 Answers 7

Your scope is ambiguous. Did you mean this:

public void setStr(String str){
    this.str = str; 
    //If I change the value of str in this SomeClass, the value does not get
    //updated for the public static String str in Globals class
   Globals.str = this.str;
}

or this:

public void setStr(String str){
    this.str = str; 
    //If I change the value of str in this SomeClass, the value does not get
    //updated for the public static String str in Globals class
    this.str = Globals.str;
}

Hopefully that helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Technically, the scope is not ambiguous. Java scoping rules require that, without additional cope indicators like this or ClassName or classInstance, the smallest scoped variable with the given name be used. That said, your examples do make the distinction more clear. –  cdeszaq Mar 12 '12 at 15:49
    
Agreed. I meant the question was ambiguous, as in I wasn't sure which scope the OP wanted to make use of. –  kaliatech Mar 12 '12 at 15:52
    
@kaliatech 2nd. Thank you –  jadrijan Mar 12 '12 at 17:28

It's because you are not calling the "global" str variable, but instead are calling the class-local str variable.

Without additional information about what str variable you are wanting to change, Java will use the most tightly-scoped variable with the given name. Just like you did with this.str in the constructor to indicate you wanted the private instance variable of the SomeClass class, you would need to do Globals.str to indicate you wanted the public static str variable that you are using as a global.

Also, as others have pointed out, Strings are immutable in Java, so what you are really doing when you assign to any variable of type String is changing the String the variable is referencing.

share|improve this answer
3  
He's not overriding anything –  blank Mar 12 '12 at 15:43
    
@BedwyrHumphreys - Good point. I miss-read the code sample initially. I have corrected my answer to reflect this. Thank you. –  cdeszaq Mar 12 '12 at 15:50

The str class variable is declared statically for the Globals class not for every class in an application. The str in Someclass has no relation to the str in Globals - they just happen to have the same identifier.

share|improve this answer
public class Globals{

public static String str;

}

public class SomeClass{

private String str;

}

Those 2 strings are not the same string (you should change one of their names). To access the str in Globals you'll have to use Globals.str. Also Strings are immutable so you don't actually change the string but create a new string and assign the value to the new one.

share|improve this answer

This is because in Java parameters are passed by value, not reference. Thus, assigning a new value to the String object is not seen outside the method. You can use a wrapper to achieve this:

class StringWrapper {
    public String value;
}

public void setString(StringWrapper wrapper) {
    wrapper.value = "some value"; // the String inside wrapper is changed
}
share|improve this answer
    
That's only true for primitives Objects are passed by reference. –  twain249 Mar 12 '12 at 15:44
1  
@twain249, no, objects aren't passed at all. (References to objects are passed though, but those are also by value.) –  aioobe Mar 12 '12 at 15:46
    
The reference to the String is still passed by value. Assigning a different reference to a String parameter will not be seen outside. –  Tudor Mar 12 '12 at 15:46

Strings are immutable.

You're passing a reference to an immutable String instance, not to the mutable str variable.

share|improve this answer
    
Strings might indeed be immutable but it has no bearing in this case. –  blank Mar 12 '12 at 16:49
    
@BedwyrHumphreys: He might think that he's mutating the existing instance. –  SLaks Mar 12 '12 at 17:21

Change:

this.str = str;

To:

Globals.str = str;
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.