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Okay, my question is to find the number of inversions in a given array.

After reading the inversion algorithm, I figured that i just needed to add 1 line of code to the mergesort algorithm that I had written a few days back.

This worked perfectly for small array sizes but somehow when I'm scaling the array upto a 100000 integers, the answer is incorrect

Here is the merge function to which I added that one line.

int merge(int arr[],int low,int mid,int high)
{
    int i,j,k;
    int arr1[11];
    int arr2[11];
    for(i=0;i<mid-low+1;i++)
        arr1[i]=arr[low+i];
    for(j=0;j<high-mid;j++)
        arr2[j]=arr[mid+1+j];
    arr1[i]=9999999;
    arr2[j]=9999999;    
    i=0;
    j=0;
    for(k=low;k<=high;k++)
    {
        if(arr1[i]<=arr2[j])
        {
            arr[k]=arr1[i];
            i++;
        }   
        else
        {
            {
                arr[k]=arr2[j];
                j++;
                count=count+mid-low+1-i; //Inversion counter. 
            }
        }       
    }
    return(0);  
}   

Can anyone please tell me as to what is wrong with this?

I've spent hours trying to figure it out, but have had no luck with it. Any input would be appreciated. Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
assert (mid-low+1) <= 10 and similar for j,mid,high. –  wildplasser Mar 12 '12 at 16:09
    
I'm sorry, I just edited the code. I just realised that writing i<mid-low+1 and j<high-mid is redundant. Could you please check it again? The answers for small cases is perfect. –  Ole Gooner Mar 12 '12 at 16:16
    
the first two loops for(i=0;i<mid-low+1;i++) arr1[i]=arr[low+i]; (similar for j,mid,high) also suffer from the same phenomenon. –  wildplasser Mar 12 '12 at 16:19
    
I don't think there's anything wrong with those loop initializers. I verified again, and the sub-arrays that are being merged through these loops contain all the valid elements. –  Ole Gooner Mar 12 '12 at 16:24
    
But they do assume that mid-low+1 < 10 and that high-mid < 10 The "999999" assignments after the loop stretch the boundaries even more. –  wildplasser Mar 12 '12 at 16:27

1 Answer 1

long long int count[200200];

int merge()
{
       long long int a[200200],n,left,right,e,i;
       scanf("%lld",&n);
       for( i = 0 ; i< n ; i++)
       {
               scanf("%lld",&a[i]);
               count[i] = 0;
           }
    long long int size,l1,h1,l2,h2,j,k,temp[200200];
    for(size = 1 ; size < n ; size = size *2)
    {
        l1 = 0;
        k = 0;
        while(l1 + size < n)
        {
            h1 = l1 + size - 1;
            l2 = h1 + 1;
            h2 = l2 + size - 1;
            if(h2 >=n )
            h2 = n - 1;
            i =l1;
            j =l2;
            left = count[h1];
            right= count[h2];
            e = 0; 
            while( i <= h1 && j <= h2)
            {
                if(a[i] <= a[j])
                {
                    temp[k++] = a[i++];
                }
                else
                {
                    e = e + h1 - i + 1;
                    temp[k++] = a[j++];
                }
            }
            count[h2] = left + right + e;
            while(i<=h1)
                temp[k++]=a[i++];
            while(j<=h2)
                temp[k++]=a[j++];
            for( i = l1 ; i <= h2 ;i++)
        //    printf("%d ",temp[i]);
        //    printf("\n");
            l1 = h2 + 1;
        }
        for(i = l1 ; k < n ; i++)
        {
            temp[k++] = a[i];
        }
        for( i = 0 ; i < n ; i++)
        {
        //    printf(" %d = %d ",i,count[i]);
            a[i] = temp[i];
        }
    }
    printf("%lld\n\n",count[n-1]);
    return 0;
}



int main()
{

      merge(); 
      return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
4  
Nice wall of code, now explain what it does and how it works. –  Kev Mar 13 '12 at 0:12

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