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// classone.h
namespace NameOne
{

class ClassOne
{
public:
    ...
    void FuncOne();
    ...
};

}

// *** Method 1 *** 
// classone.cpp
namespace NameOne // always define member functions inside the namespace
{

void ClassOne::FuncOne()
{ ... }

}

// *** Method 2 *** 
// classone.cpp
void NameOne::ClassOne::FuncOne() // always prefix the namespace
{ ... }

Question> I have seen two methods to handle the namespace in CPP files. Which method is a better practice in a large project(i.e. Method 1 or Method 2)

Thank you

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closed as primarily opinion-based by Joachim Pileborg, Mat, JB., Doorknob, VladL Oct 4 '13 at 12:51

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
I always do it, but I also usually use shorter namespace names and no uppercase. –  PlasmaHH Mar 12 '12 at 16:35

6 Answers 6

If it's not in a header file it doesn't matter as long as you're consistent. I personally prefer the first method as the namespace isn't so relevant when you read the function name.

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First method involves less redundancy as well (thus less typing, easier to change if necessary). –  edA-qa mort-ora-y Mar 12 '12 at 17:15
    
@edA-qamort-ora-y: I don;t like an argument based on less typing that just seems lazy. Though I agree a single point to change (thus making it less likely for accidental bugs). –  Loki Astari Mar 12 '12 at 18:00
    
Well less typing does mean lower chance of typos as well. –  BoBTFish Mar 12 '12 at 19:21
    
@LokiAstari, redundancy=bugs, period. Less code is less maintenance effort. Less code is less chance for duplicated bugs. Less is almost always better when it comes to code. –  edA-qa mort-ora-y Mar 13 '12 at 5:28
    
@edA-qamort-ora-y: I agree with the principle => Less redundancy makes better and code and thus less bugs and thus is a good goal. I disagree that => Less typing for typing sake is a good objective. Lazy people will take that and apply it to situations that are not appropriate and use it as a justification. –  Loki Astari Mar 13 '12 at 6:33

This is the only situation where I use using namespace X.
I think it is an OK usage(but I am still thinking on it) but willing to hear other points of view.

In file Bar.cpp

// Bar in namespace Foo
#include "Bar.h"

// Only do this for the class I am defining
using namespace Foo;
Bar::Bar()
{
}
void Bar::stop()
{
}
// etc

I have been experementing with:

// Bar in namespace Foo
#include "Bar.h"

// Only do this for the class I am defining
using Foo::Bar;
Bar::Bar()
{
}
void Bar::stop()
{
}
// etc
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I guess this is very much up to your own personal preference, and besides that also depending on what was already used in the code base you're writing code in.

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I prefer to add using namespace NameOne. Method 1 increases indentation, method 2 makes declaration longer but this is just a personal opinion. Just be coherent in your code (and code base).

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I am sure I remember reading around the time namespaces were introduced to C++ that Method 2 is the best approach and certainly to be preferred over Method 1 and that is what I have always used.

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The reason why you use namespace is generally for gathering your classes/methods in a group/package having consistent function so that they don't coincide with the definitions (both literally and functionally) in other libraries or namespaces.

Therefore, I prefer using namespace Foo in cpp files because most of the time I refer to different classes in the same namespace. If I need to use a class from another namespace I definitely use Foo2:: suffix. It keeps the distance between the implemented namespace and the others.

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