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I'm trying to convert JDE dates, and have amassed a large quantity of information and figured I'd try to do an SQL conversion function to simplify some tasks.

Here's the function I came up with, which I simply call "ToGregorian"

CREATE FUNCTION [dbo].[ToGregorian](@julian varchar(6))
RETURNS datetime AS BEGIN
    DECLARE @datetime datetime

    SET @datetime = CAST(19+CAST(SUBSTRING(@julian, 1, 1) as int) as varchar(4))+SUBSTRING(@julian, 2,2)+'-01-01'
    SET @datetime = DATEADD(day, CAST(SUBSTRING(@julian, 4,3) as int)-1, @datetime)

    RETURN @datetime
END
  1. Takes a "julian" string.
  2. Takes the first letter and adds it to century, starting from 19th.
  3. Adds decade and years from the next 2 characters.
  4. Finally adds the days, which are the final 3 characters, and subtracts 1 as it already had 1 day in the first setup. (eg. 2011-01-01)
  5. Result ex: 111186 => 2011-07-05 00:00:00.000

In my opinion this is a bit clumsy and overkill, and I'm hoping there is a better way of doing this. Perhaps I'm doing too many conversions or maybe I should use a different method alltogether?

Any advice how to improve the function?
Perhaps a different, better, method?
Wouldn't mind if it could be more readable as well...

I've also got an inline version, where if for instance, I only have read privileges and can't use functions, which also looks messy, is it possible to make it more readable, or better?

CAST(REPLACE(Convert(VARCHAR, DATEADD(d,CAST(SUBSTRING(CAST([column] AS VARCHAR), 4,3) AS INT)-1, CAST(CAST(19+CAST(SUBSTRING(CAST([column] AS VARCHAR), 1,1) AS INT) AS VARCHAR)+SUBSTRING(CAST([column] AS VARCHAR), 2,2) + '-01-01' AS DATETIME)), 111), '/', '-') AS DATETIME)
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If the date is in the 1900s, is the leading character 0, or is the string 5 digits? –  Aaron Bertrand Mar 12 '12 at 17:10
    
@AaronBertrand It would be 5 digits, but none of the tables I've seen have had a date below the 2000s since the system my company uses was established around 2003-4. It shouldn't be a problem, but it raises the question, how would the query look differently if I'd have to take that into account? –  ShadowScripter Mar 12 '12 at 17:21
    
You should use RIGHT('0' + column, 6) to be safe, or add a constraint to check that LEN(column) = 6 and/or LEFT(column,1) = '1'. –  Aaron Bertrand Mar 12 '12 at 17:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think it is more efficient to use native datetime math than all this switching back and forth to various string, date and numeric formats.

DECLARE @julian VARCHAR(6) = '111186';

SELECT DATEADD(YEAR, 
  100*CONVERT(INT, LEFT(@julian,1))
  +10*CONVERT(INT, SUBSTRING(@julian, 2,1))
  +CONVERT(INT, SUBSTRING(@julian,3,1)), 
 DATEADD(DAY, CONVERT(INT,SUBSTRING(@julian, 4, 3))-1, 
 0));

Result:

===================
2011-07-05 00:00:00

Assuming this data doesn't change often, it may be much more efficient to actually store the date as a computed column (which is why I chose the base date of 0 instead of some string representation, which would cause determinism issues preventing the column from being persisted and potentially indexed).

CREATE TABLE dbo.JDEDates
(
    JDEDate VARCHAR(6),

    GregorianDate AS CONVERT(SMALLDATETIME, 
      DATEADD(YEAR, 
        100*CONVERT(INT, LEFT(RIGHT('0'+JDEDate,6),1))
        +10*CONVERT(INT, SUBSTRING(RIGHT('0'+JDEDate,6), 2,1))
        +CONVERT(INT, SUBSTRING(RIGHT('0'+JDEDate,6),3,1)), 
      DATEADD(DAY, CONVERT(INT, RIGHT(JDEDate, 3))-1, 
      0))
    ) PERSISTED
);

INSERT dbo.JDEDates(JDEDate) SELECT '111186';

SELECT JDEDate, GregorianDate FROM dbo.JDEDates;

Results:

JDEDate GregorianDate
======= ===================
111186  2011-07-05 00:00:00

Even if you don't index the column, it still hides the ugly calculation away from you, being persisted you only pay that at write time, as it doesn't cause you to perform expensive functional operations at query time whenever that column is referenced...

share|improve this answer
    
Sadly, I only have read permissions on the official work server. I've got a server where I'm admin, but I straight up use gregorian instead. Your solution seems elegant, could you perhaps walk me through what you're doing and why? :P –  ShadowScripter Mar 12 '12 at 17:36
    
I followed exactly as your formula described, but in the opposite order. Working from right to left, I take the base date (0 = 1900-01-01) and add the number of days (the last 3 digits of JDE) less 1, then add the number of years (the 3rd digit) + the number of decades (which is 10 times the 2nd digit + the number of centuries (which is the first digit). –  Aaron Bertrand Mar 12 '12 at 17:40
    
PS just because you don't have write permissions on the server doesn't mean you can't get something implemented there. How does anything you write get to the server? –  Aaron Bertrand Mar 12 '12 at 17:42
    
The official work server uses an application interface, whereas mine uses a web interface. Where the data is extracted once every 2 weeks from the other server. It's to lighten the workload from the already very busy server. The web interface has lots of users and if I were to query the other server, it would be tremendously slow, especially during work hours. So, nothing is written to that server, only read. –  ShadowScripter Mar 12 '12 at 17:52
USE [master]
GO
/****** Object:  UserDefinedFunction [dbo].[ToGregorian]    Script Date: 08/18/2015 14:33:17 ******/
SET ANSI_NULLS ON
GO
SET QUOTED_IDENTIFIER ON
GO
ALTER FUNCTION [dbo].[ToGregorian](@julian varchar(6),@time varchar(6))
RETURNS datetime 
AS 
BEGIN
    DECLARE @datetime datetime,@hour int, @minute int, @second int

    set @time = ltrim(rtrim(@time));
    set @julian = ltrim(rtrim(@julian));

    if(LEN(@julian) = 5)
        set @julian = '0' + @julian


    IF(LEN(@time) = 6)
        BEGIN
            SET @hour = Convert(int,LEFT(@time,2));
            SET @minute = CONVERT(int,Substring(@time,3,2));
            SET @second = CONVERT(int,Substring(@time,5,2));
        END
    else IF(LEN(@time) = 5)
        BEGIN
            SET @hour = Convert(int,LEFT(@time,1));
            SET @minute = CONVERT(int,Substring(@time,2,2));
            SET @second = CONVERT(int,Substring(@time,4,2));
        END
    else IF(LEN(@time) = 4)
        BEGIN
            SET @hour = 0;
            SET @minute = CONVERT(int,LEFT(@time,2));
            SET @second = CONVERT(int,Substring(@time,3,2));
        END
    else IF(LEN(@time) = 3)
        BEGIN
            SET @hour = 0;
            SET @minute = CONVERT(int,LEFT(@time,1));
            SET @second = CONVERT(int,Substring(@time,2,2));
        END
    else
        BEGIN
            SET @hour = 0;
            SET @minute = 0;
            SET @second = @time;
        END

    SET @datetime = DATEADD(YEAR,100*CONVERT(INT, LEFT(@julian,1))+10*CONVERT(INT, SUBSTRING(@julian, 2,1))+CONVERT(INT, SUBSTRING(@julian,3,1)),0);                     
    SET @datetime = DATEADD(DAY, CONVERT(INT,SUBSTRING(@julian, 4, 3))-1,@datetime);                   
    SET @datetime = DATEADD(hour,@hour,@datetime)
    SET @datetime = DATEADD(minute,@minute,@datetime);
    SET @datetime = DATEADD(second,@second,@datetime);

    RETURN @datetime
END
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