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I often encounter the following situation in my Oracle execution plans:

Operation                   | Object  | Order | Rows | Bytes | Projection
----------------------------+---------+-------+------+-------+-------------
TABLE ACCESS BY INDEX ROWID | PROD    |     7 |   2M |   28M | PROD.VALUE
  INDEX UNIQUE SCAN         | PROD_PK |     6 |   1  |       | PROD.ROWID

This is an extract from a larger execution plan. Essentially, I'm accessing (joining) a table using the table's primary key. Typically, there is another table ACCO with ACCO.PROD_ID = PROD.ID, where PROD_PK is the primary key on PROD.ID. Obviously, the table can be accessed using a UNIQUE SCAN, but as soon as I have some silly projection on that table, it seems as though the whole table (around 2 million rows) is planned to be read in memory. I get a lot of I/O and buffer gets. When I remove the projection from the greater query, the problem disappears:

Operation                   | Object  | Order | Rows | Bytes | Projection
----------------------------+---------+-------+------+-------+-------------
TABLE ACCESS BY INDEX ROWID | PROD    |     7 |   1  |     8 | PROD.ID
  INDEX UNIQUE SCAN         | PROD_PK |     6 |   1  |       | PROD.ROWID

I don't understand this behaviour. What could be the reasons for this? Note, I cannot post the complete query. It is rather complex and involves a lot of calculations. The pattern, however, is often the same.

UPDATE: I maganged to bring down my rather complex setup to a simple simulation that produces a similar execution plan in both cases (when projecting PROD.VALUE or when leaving it away):

Create the following database:

-- products have a value
create table prod as
select level as id, 10 as value from dual 
connect by level < 100000;
alter table prod add constraint prod_pk primary key (id);

-- some products are accounts
create table acco as
select level as id, level as prod_id from dual 
connect by level < 50000;
alter table acco 
  add constraint acco_pk primary key (id);
alter table acco 
  add constraint acco_prod_fk foreign key (prod_id) references prod (id);

-- accounts have transactions with values
create table trxs as
select level as id, mod(level, 10) + 1 as acco_id, mod(level, 17) + 1 as value
from dual connect by level < 100000;
alter table trxs 
  add constraint trxs_pk primary key (id);
alter table trxs 
  add constraint trxs_acco_fk foreign key (acco_id) references acco (id);

create index acco_i on acco(prod_id);
create index trxs_i on trxs(acco_id);

alter table acco modify prod_id not null;
alter table trxs modify acco_id not null;

Run the following query

select v2.*
from (
  select 
    -- This calculates the balance for every transaction as a
    -- running total, subtracting trxs.value from the product's value
    --
    -- This is the "projection" I mentioned that causes I/O. Leaving it
    -- away (setting it to 0), would improve the execution plan
    prod.value - v1.total balance,
    acco.id acco_id
  from (
    select 
      acco_id,
      sum(value) over (partition by acco_id
                       order by id
                       rows between unbounded preceding 
                       and current row) total
    from trxs
  ) v1
  join acco on v1.acco_id = acco.id
  join prod on acco.prod_id = prod.id
) v2
-- This is the single-row access predicate. From here, it is
-- clear that there can only be 1 acco and 1 prod
where v2.acco_id = 1;

Analyse

When analysing execution plans for the above query (with or without any prod.value projection), I can reproduce an excessive amount of rows / bytes in the plan when accessing the prod table.

I have found a workaround for this issue. But I'm really interested in an explanation about what is going wrong and how I could correct this problem without changing the query too much

Update

OK, after much more analysis, I have to say that the actual problematic I/O was due to a wrong index being used somewhere entirely else. Unfortunately, this was not well-enough projected in overall statistics (or in the execution plan) to notice.

As far as this question goes, I'm still curious about the projected I/O in the execution plan, as that appears to confuse our DBA (and me) time and again. And sometimes, it really is the source of I/O problems...

share|improve this question
    
I think we need to look at the query to help... Could you simplify it, make sure it still behaves as you described it, and post it here? – Pablo Santa Cruz Mar 12 '12 at 17:07
    
@PabloSantaCruz: I'll wait until someone has a more concrete hint for me to look for (they usually do). Reducing the problem to something that I can post here is non-trivial... – Lukas Eder Mar 12 '12 at 17:08
    
@LukasEder hey, what do u mean "it seems as though the whole table is planned to be read in memory"? U mean a FTS? Also, not sure your meaning of "remove the projection from the greater query". – tbone Mar 12 '12 at 17:15
    
@LukasEder - What sort of calculations are you talking about? Are there aggregations that need to read the data from all 2 million rows in the table in order to return the computed value? The query plan you posted implies that there is no filter condition. If the query is only returning one row, that implies that you're doing a lot of aggregation. – Justin Cave Mar 12 '12 at 17:16
3  
@LukasEder - As the answer is dependant on what processing is being done on the data, and the query is non-trivial, I'd have to say that the answer is going to be non-trivial. If you want to understand the general case, can you replicate the general case with a generic data structure and query? If you want an answer to your specific case, we need to know about your specific case. – MatBailie Mar 12 '12 at 17:35
up vote 0 down vote accepted

It might be interesting to note that I have checked up on various scenarios, including a specific solution for the specific example. Re-phrase the sample query to be like this would solve the problem in this case:

select
  -- Explicitly project value in a nested loop. This seems to be much cheaper
  -- in this specific case
  (select value from prod where id = v2.prod_id) - v2.balance,
  v2.acco_id
from (
  select 
    -- Now, balance is only a running total, not the running total
    -- added to PROD.VALUE
    v1.total balance,
    acco.id acco_id,
    acco.prod_id prod_id
  from (
    select 
      acco_id,
      sum(value) over (partition by acco_id
                       order by id
                       rows between unbounded preceding 
                       and current row) total
    from trxs
  ) v1
  -- The JOIN of PROD is no longer needed
  join acco on v1.acco_id = acco.id
) v2
where v2.acco_id = 1;

But I still don't understand why Oracle would project so much I/O in its execution plan, if I join prod earlier in this query...

share|improve this answer

Actually, when selecting v1.total, you're triggering a no_merge view.

When using analytics function in sub-selects, the sub-selects need to be resolved before joining with the rest, so, in this case v1 is executed fully and the entire resultset is "fetched", before it is joined. And looking at you query, that means full scan on trxs+ a sort for the analytic function

When commenting out v1.total, then the optimizer merges the view and ignores the function entirely, as it sees that it is not used.

Update

I used your sample, here is the fiddle for your original query, and for your solution. Explain plans statistics differ in the "unique scan of Prod". Explain plan have no way of accurately estimating the cost of queries in the select clause, it does show how it will be executed when a row is fetched, but it doesn't tell how many times it will be executed, and it doesn't cost it. The cost you see there, is only the cost to fetch the 1st row, but the query will run every time you fetch a row, and the execution plan has no idea how many you will fetch. That should explain the cost and IO prediction differences.

On a side note, Queries in the Select clause, do not scale, unless you're sure that the over query will return a finite, predictable, and a manageable number of rows, avoid using them. They will come and bite you later:)

y

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not commenting out v1.total. Maybe that's a bit confusing in my example because it is renamed from v1.total to v2.balance... Effectively, there is no need for a full scan on trxs either, as indexes can be used for the analytic function's partition by, order by and windowing clause... – Lukas Eder Apr 16 '12 at 8:37
    
Please post which 2 queries you're comparing. – Younes Apr 16 '12 at 13:21
    
I've posted the original query in the question, and a possible workaround in this answer... – Lukas Eder Apr 16 '12 at 13:28

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