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This is partially a javascript technique question. I am trying to build an object with facebook id as the key, and an array of likes as the value. My issue is the in my innermost function, I cannot access the variable fbid that I need for setting the key.

How to get access to fbid in the scope of the inner anonymous function?

friendsLikes = [];
FB.api('/me/friends',function(friends){
    for(var i=0;i<friends.data.length;i++){
        var fbid = friends.data[i].id
        FB.api(fbid+'/likes',function(likes){
            if(likes.data.length>=1){
                            //this is where I build the object
                            //I cannot use fbid for the key :(
                console.log(likes.data.length);
            }
        })
    }
})
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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The problem is that fbid is updated on each iteration, before your callback executes.

  • Loop through friends list
  • Set fbid to the friend's ID
  • Initiate an async call to get that friend's likes
  • Continue to next friend until we loop through the entire list
  • Some time passes
  • Results come back from the server and callbacks begin executing. At this point, fbid is the same for all callbacks – specifically, it is set to the ID of the last friend in the list.

Here's how I'd capture the fbid of each iteration:

friendsLikes = [];
FB.api('/me/friends',function(friends){
    for(var i=0;i<friends.data.length;i++){
        var fbid = friends.data[i].id
        FB.api(fbid+'/likes', function(fbid) { return function(likes){
            if(likes.data.length>=1){
                            // `fbid` will be correct here
                console.log(likes.data.length);
            }
        }}(fbid));
    }
});

Notice that we use a self-executing function and pass the current fbid. This returns a function that will have the proper fbid in scope.


And now a note on how you're doing this: this code's performance is going to suck because you're paying for a HTTP roundtrip for each friend. Remember that a browser will only open somewhere between 2-8 connections per host (depending on browser), and all of these calls are going to graph.facebook.com.

With a modest friend list of 200 and a generous roundtrip time of 150ms, the theoretical best case scenario is ~4 seconds. Things quickly go downhill if the browser will only do 2 concurrent connections and we have a 200ms roundtrip time: 20 seconds.

It's also highly likely Facebook might rate-limit you at some point.

Instead, you need to use the Batch API.

FB.api('/', 'POST', { batch: [
    { method: 'GET', relative_url: id+'/likes' },
    ...
] }, function(r) {
    // `r` will be an array of results for each item in `batch`
});
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the second part of your answer, about performance. –  Nick Silva Mar 12 '12 at 23:22
    
Of course. It's a good rule of thumb to say to yourself "I might want to rethink this" if you're ever firing off AJAX requests from a loop. There's usually a better way. –  josh3736 Mar 13 '12 at 1:58

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