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The key part of my question is the skipping. I plan to use an enum type that has about 20 elements. I want to iterate through this set but need to skip an element or two each time. What to skip is known in advance. A comparable example is the enum type that consists of all letters of the alphabet, and when iterating, I want to skip all the vowels.

How should I code the iteration in an elegant/efficient way? Should I make a separate set of elements consisting of vowels? I have no code to show because I am just thinking about the problem.

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up vote 20 down vote accepted
var query = Enum.GetValues(typeof(MyEnum))
    .Cast<MyEnum>()
    .Except(new MyEnum[] { MyEnum.A, MyEnum.E });
foreach (MyEnum item in query) {
    ...
}

You need to cast in order to get the magic of LINQ. Except alone will not do it.


UPDATE:

I got another idea. You can define the enum with the FlagsAttribute and define the regular values as powers of 2, what is most easily achieved with the bitwise shift left operator <<. Then it is possible to combine existing values to form new values.

[Flags]
enum MyEnum
{
    None = 0,
    A = 1 << 0,
    B = 1 << 1,
    C = 1 << 2,
    D = 1 << 3,
    E = 1 << 4,
    ...
    X = 1 << 23,
    Y = 1 << 24,
    Z = 1 << 25,
    Vowels = A | E | I | O | U
}

Now, you can formulate the query like this

IEnumerable<MyEnum> query = Enum.GetValues(typeof(MyEnum))
    .Cast<MyEnum>()
    .Where(x => (x & MyEnum.Vowels) == MyEnum.None);
foreach (MyEnum item in query) {
    ...
}

You can define up to 32 powers of two. If you need more, you can define the base type of the enum as long and use up to 64 flag values (plus combinations of existing flag values).

[Flags]
enum MyEnum : long
{
    ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is probably the most complete answer. The easiest thing to do from here is to specify various collections of Enums that you would want to skip, that way you can have those skip collections saved and can pass in whatever criteria you want in Except. – SPFiredrake Mar 12 '12 at 17:42
    
Yes, and you can also keep various queries. – Olivier Jacot-Descombes Mar 12 '12 at 17:46
1  
I added another solution using only a bitwise AND to make the test. It does not require any arrays or HashSets for the exceptional values. Please see my update. – Olivier Jacot-Descombes Mar 12 '12 at 22:56

I would make a separate set of elements consisting of vowels, and then take the set difference between the two sets using LINQ.

int[] vowels = {Letters.A, Letters.E, Letters.I, Letters.O, Letters.U};
IEnumerable<int> consonant = Enum.GetValues(typeof(Letters)).Except(vowels);
foreach (int consonant in consonants)
{
    // Do something with each consonant
}
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I'd probably just use LINQ - use Enum.GetValues (or use Unconstrained Melody - a type-safe generic enum/delegate library I wrote) to get all the values, then express which values to keep/skip via a Whereclause.

If you're only skipping specific values, a HashSet or something similar may be useful (not worth it if you're only skipping one, of course) - if you're skipping based on a condition, then a full-blown predicate is called for.

For example:

public static IEnumerable<T> AllBut(T skipped) where T : struct
{
    IEqualityComparer<T> comparer = EqualityComparer<T>.Default;
    return AllBut<T>(t => !comparer.Equals(skipped, t));
}

public static IEnumerable<T> AllBut(Func<T, bool> skipPredicate) where T : struct
{
    IEqualityComparer<T> comparer = EqualityComparer<T>.Default;
    return Enum.GetValues(typeof(T))
               .Cast<T>()
               .Where(t => skipPredicate(t));
}
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