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I've seen this asked a few times on SO, and the same answers are given which do not work on my end in Chrome or Firefox.

I want to make a set of left-floated divs run off, horizontally a parent div with a horizontal scroll bar.

I'm able to demonstrate what I want to do with this crappy inline css here: http://jsfiddle.net/ajkochanowicz/tSpLx/3/

However, from the answers given on SO*, this should work but does not on my end. http://jsfiddle.net/ajkochanowicz/tSpLx/2/

Is there a way to do this without defining absolute positioning for each item?

*e.g. Prevent floated divs from wrapping to next line

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The absolute positioning is looking pretty good right about now. –  ajkochanowicz Mar 12 '12 at 18:18
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3 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

This should be all you need. Tested in jsfiddle on Chrome, but pretty standard stuff:

Markup:

<div class="outer">
    <div class="float-wrap">
        <div class="left-floater">
            One
        </div>
        <div class="left-floater">
            Two
        </div>
        <div class="left-floater">
            Three
        </div>
        <div class="left-floater">
            I should be to the left of "Three"
        </div>
        <div class="left-floater">
            I float.
        </div>
        <div class="left-floater">
            I float.
        </div>
        <div class="left-floater">
            I float.
        </div>
        <div class="left-floater">
            I float.
        </div>
    </div>
</div>​

CSS:

.float-wrap {
  /* 816 = <number of floats> * (<float width> + 2 * <float border width>) */
  width:816px;
  border:1px solid;
  /* causes .float-wrap's height to match its child divs */
  overflow:auto;
}
.left-floater {
  width:100px;
  height:100px;
  border:1px solid;    
  float:left;
}

.outer {
  overflow-x: scroll;   
}

​ .float-wrap keeps space open for the divs. Because it will always maintain at least enough space to keep them side-by-side, they'll never need to wrap. .outer provides a scroll bar, and sizes to the width of the window.

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4  
Excellent work, Aaron. Here is a link to the JSFiddle for readers: jsfiddle.net/ajkochanowicz/wkqQU –  ajkochanowicz Mar 14 '12 at 13:48
    
Is it possible to have the width: attribute in the .float-wrap selector automatically computed? Or must it be hard-coded? –  feralin Jun 30 at 18:06
    
@feralin In standard CSS, it has to be hard coded. If you use LESS or Sass, you can use variables to get something like width: @floatsPerRow * (@floatWidth + 2 * @floatBorderWidth) –  AaronSieb Jun 30 at 18:35
    
If the number of floats in the row can change over time, then is javascript the way to go to compute the required width? –  feralin Jun 30 at 18:39
    
@feralin Probably. It depends on your exact requirements. For example, if you're just switching between portrait and landscape mode, you would probably just use classes to control the number of elements per row. –  AaronSieb Jun 30 at 18:48
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Use a second wrapper around the elements with absolute positioning. Then you can just float the individual items.

<style type="text/css">
    #outter {
        position: relative;
        width: 500px;
        height: 200px;
        overflow: scroll;
    }
    #inner {
        position: absolute;
        top: 0;
        left: 0;
        width: 1000px;
        height: 200px;
    }
    #inner .item {
        float: left;
        display: inline;
    }    
</style>

<div id="outter">
    <div id="inner">
        <div class="item">Item #1</div>
        <div class="item">Item #2</div>
        <div class="item">Item #3</div>
    </div>
</div>

You will have to adjust the width of #inner based on the number of items you'll have inside it. This can be done on load if you know the number of items or with javascript after the page loads.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry. Just fixed the CSS. #inner .left should have been #inner .item. –  Kory Sharp Mar 12 '12 at 17:59
    
Thanks, @Kory. I cleaned this up and added a width and height value to the floated divs, but it still does the same thing: jsfiddle.net/ajkochanowicz/7Feaj –  ajkochanowicz Mar 12 '12 at 18:03
    
Just made a revision, it appears if you make another child div and give that the width/height values (but not "float:left") it then works: jsfiddle.net/ajkochanowicz/7Feaj/1 –  ajkochanowicz Mar 12 '12 at 18:06
    
Hmm, but now you have to specify a px value for the width of .outer. Making it 100% breaks it. –  ajkochanowicz Mar 12 '12 at 18:12
    
Are you wanting this to be a fluid width container? Either way, you'll need to dynamically update the width of the #inner container to accommodate the exact size of it's children. That make sense? –  Kory Sharp Mar 12 '12 at 18:35
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there were extra sytles added inside the html ... that sets the margins..

also you should be careful of the margins you set within your css because .. height is probably what could be affecting it because it is set at certain pixels and is not elastic anymore...

you could try creating divs within divs... just seperate top div and mid div and bottom div. makes styling it a lot easier for each section. I hope this helped... :) cheers

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3  
Sorry, I don't understand this at all. –  ajkochanowicz Mar 12 '12 at 18:11
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