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I am trying to write some code that can list out the possibilities given a reg-ex expression. Note that this expression is a little different, each letter represents a protein so its limited, for instance:

[IG]...D.SG

This basically implies if I list out all possibilities, I get something like: the first letter can be either I or G, then the second letter can be any of the 20 protein letters, the third sane be any of the 20 letters, the fifth can be any of the 20, the sixth has to be D, the seventh can be any of the 20 and the last two are fixed as SG.

I know that by using itertools.product() I can do something similar to this for instance:

pos = [['det'], ['noun', 'adj'], ['noun'],
       ['vb'], ['det'], ['vb', 'noun', 'adj']]
for x in itertools.product(*pos):
print " ".join(x)

prints

det noun noun vb det vb
det noun noun vb det noun
det noun noun vb det adj
det adj noun vb det vb
det adj noun vb det noun
det adj noun vb det adj

How can I extend that to my problem? Thanks for the help.

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I'm not sure regex is really what you are looking for. You could use regex syntax, but I think you'd have to write your own parser/generator. I mean, you could use regex, I suppose, if you built a giant list containing every possible (20**8) combination of characters, then filtered it using the regex, but that seems highly inefficient to me. As long as you aren't going to be doing really long sequences, this seems like a good candidate for recursion to me. –  Silas Ray Mar 12 '12 at 18:20
    
@sr2222 yea recursion seems like it would work. –  dhillonv10 Mar 12 '12 at 18:48
    
Maybe recursion is the answer, but more generally, figure out how to achieve your task without generating all the possibilities. It's almost always better to match your data against a pattern like that, not the other way around. What problem are you solving that won't let you use your pattern as a real regexp? –  alexis Mar 12 '12 at 22:55
    
@alexis: I have to create sample data from the pattern, so after listing out all the possibilities, I can pipe those to a file and then input them to a tool, i'm using that for a benchmark study that let's me see the performance of that tool (i'm trying to keep it short but its a bit more complicated than that) –  dhillonv10 Mar 13 '12 at 1:07
    
If you need to create sample data, you just need an algorithm that walks your string and (pseudo-)randomly chooses a path through it. You do NOT need to generate and store gigabytes of data for this. –  alexis Mar 13 '12 at 7:48
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4 Answers

itertools.product() is the way to go here. If your proteins are all single characters then for each position in your "regex", just put a string representing the valid proteins for that position into the itertools.product() arguments.

For example [IG]...D.SG would become the following:

p = 'ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRST'   # or whatever the 20 valid proteins are
itr = itertools.product('IG', p, p, p, 'D', p, 'S', 'G')

As for taking any arbitrary regex and generating the arguments for itertools.product(), that could get complicated pretty quickly if you need support for things like repetition, if you only allow character classes, ., and single characters then you could do something like this:

s = '[IG]...D.SG'
args = [p if m == '.' else m.strip('[]') for m in re.findall(r'(\[.+?\]|.)', s)]
# args == ['IG', 'ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRST', 'ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRST', 'ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRST', 'D', 'ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRST', 'S', 'G']
itr = itertools.product(*args)
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thanks a lot for providing that snippet, I can try to take it from there, for some reason when I put that in a file test.py and run it, I get the error: Traceback (most recent call last): File "<stdin>", line 2, in <module> NameError: name 're' is not defined which most likely means that I haven't imported something correctly. –  dhillonv10 Mar 13 '12 at 1:16
    
import re. You need to learn a little python to write your program. –  alexis Mar 13 '12 at 7:52
    
thanks alexis, yea i'm new to python, i've coded in java a lot but this segment of code or function needs to go in a open source tool so for that I have to write it in python –  dhillonv10 Mar 18 '12 at 19:40
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To generate sample data (as your comment says you need), you should not be generating the complete set of possibilities! Since you said the word "protein", calculate how many possibilities there are and how much disk space you'd need for one real test, and you'll see why this is a non-starter.

An RE (including yours) describes a finite state automaton, and I think it makes sense to convert yours into a form that you can traverse randomly to generate data. If your REs only have character ranges and wildcard (.), it's going to be pretty trivial since there are no loops: Convert '[IG]...D.SG' into a list in the form

[ 'IG', '.', '.', '.', 'D', '.', 'S', 'G' ]

and traverse the list, choosing a letter randomly with random.choice from the options at each step--or from the entire alphabet if the letter is "." (Or don't convert it, just traverse it as-is. But converting divides the problem into two easy parts).

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+1 for "only generate what you need, when you need it". There are 320,000 possibilities for the string you have specified ([IG]...D.SG), and 300k-element lists are unwieldy. It gets exponentially worse for longer strings (300-element proteins? order of 10^390 possibilities.) –  Li-aung Yip Mar 13 '12 at 8:32
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If you are looking for a generic solution, you could examine the code of http://code.google.com/p/xeger/

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As far as I could understand, you want to enter a pattern like

[IG]...D.SG

And be able to generate the complete list of possible combinations.

Building upon what you have already provided and answer by alexis, I think the following should be able to do what you want

import itertools

def main():
    proteins = ['A','B','C','D','E','F','G','H','I',]
    prot_seq = [['I','G',],proteins,proteins,proteins,['D',],proteins,['S',],['G'],]
    fn = open('try.txt','w')
    for x in itertools.product(*prot_seq):
        value = ''.join(x)
        fn.write(value)
        fn.write('\n')
    fn.close()

if __name__=='__main__':
    main()

Note that we have specified your sequence as a list

prot_seq = [['I','G',],proteins,proteins,proteins,['D',],proteins,['S',],['G'],]

If you do not want to explicitly specify the prot_seq as a python list and instead want to able to calculate ALL possibilities given an RE like strings as

[IG]...D.SG

Then you can write a rudimentary parser that converts the string expression to equivalent list expression. This program does exactly that. The output of both are totally same.

import itertools
proteins = ['A','B','C','D','E','F','G','H','I',]   #Make this list as long as you want

def convert_to_seq(prot_seq_str):
    global proteins
    prot_seq = []
    for char in prot_seq_str:
        if char == '[':
            new_seq = []
            in_group = 1
        elif char == ']':
            in_group = 0
            prot_seq.append(new_seq)
        elif char == '.':
            prot_seq.append(proteins)
        else:
            if in_group == 1:
                new_seq.append(char)
            else:
                prot_seq.append(char)
    return prot_seq


def main():    
    prot_seq_str = '[IG]...D.SG'
    prot_seq = convert_to_seq(prot_seq_str)
    fn = open('try2.txt','w')
    for x in itertools.product(*prot_seq):
        value = ''.join(x)
        fn.write(value)
        fn.write('\n')
    fn.close()

if __name__=='__main__':
    main()
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