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I have been working with a string[] array in C# that gets returned from a function call. I was wondering what the best way to remove duplicates from this array would be? I could possibly cast to a Generic collection, but I was wondering if there was a better way to do it, possibly by using a temp array?

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6  
Awesome question. I ask this question on interviews and it usually filters out 90% of the applicants. –  AngryHacker Mar 5 '10 at 20:34
    
Indeed. It's more fun when the array is already sorted - in that case it can be done in-place in O(n) time. –  David Airapetyan Mar 2 '12 at 20:54
1  
@AngryHacker I've never been on a interview before, but I'm wondering 90% doesn't know how to solve this? or you're expecting sort of a specific answer? –  Vitim.us Nov 22 '12 at 17:58
    
@Vitim.us Nope. In my case, it isn't even an array, but a List<string>. I accept any answer that does the job. Perhaps, it's a shock of having to do it on paper. –  AngryHacker Nov 23 '12 at 0:05

16 Answers 16

up vote 212 down vote accepted

You could possibly use a LINQ query to do this:

int[] s = { 1, 2, 3, 3, 4};
int[] q = s.Distinct().ToArray();
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Here is the HashSet<string> approach:

public static string[] RemoveDuplicates(string[] s)
{
    HashSet<string> set = new HashSet<string>(s);
    string[] result = new string[set.Count];
    set.CopyTo(result);
    return result;
}

Unfortunately this solution also requires .NET framework 3.5 or later as HashSet was not added until that version. You could also use array.Distinct(), which is a feature of LINQ.

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4  
This probably will not preserve the original order. –  Hamish Grubijan Jul 5 '11 at 15:07

If you needed to sort it, then you could implement a sort that also removes duplicates.

Kills two birds with one stone, then.

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This might depend on how much you want to engineer the solution - if the array is never going to be that big and you don't care about sorting the list you might want to try something similar to the following:

    public string[] RemoveDuplicates(string[] myList) {
        System.Collections.ArrayList newList = new System.Collections.ArrayList();

        foreach (string str in myList)
            if (!newList.Contains(str))
                newList.Add(str);
        return (string[])newList.ToArray(typeof(string));
    }
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1  
You should use List instead of ArrayList. –  Doug S Oct 27 '12 at 5:05

-- This is Interview Question asked every time. Now i done its coding.

static void Main(string[] args)
{    
            int[] array = new int[] { 4, 8, 4, 1, 1, 4, 8 };            
            int numDups = 0, prevIndex = 0;

            for (int i = 0; i < array.Length; i++)
            {
                bool foundDup = false;
                for (int j = 0; j < i; j++)
                {
                    if (array[i] == array[j])
                    {
                        foundDup = true;
                        numDups++; // Increment means Count for Duplicate found in array.
                        break;
                    }                    
                }

                if (foundDup == false)
                {
                    array[prevIndex] = array[i];
                    prevIndex++;
                }
            }

            // Just Duplicate records replce by zero.
            for (int k = 1; k <= numDups; k++)
            {               
                array[array.Length - k] = '\0';             
            }


            Console.WriteLine("Console program for Remove duplicates from array.");
            Console.Read();
        }
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The following piece of code attempts to remove duplicates from an ArrayList though this is not an optimal solution. I was asked this question during an interview to remove duplicates through recursion, and without using a second/temp arraylist:

private void RemoveDuplicate() 
{

ArrayList dataArray = new ArrayList(5);

            dataArray.Add("1");
            dataArray.Add("1");
            dataArray.Add("6");
            dataArray.Add("6");
            dataArray.Add("6");
            dataArray.Add("3");
            dataArray.Add("6");
            dataArray.Add("4");
            dataArray.Add("5");
            dataArray.Add("4");
            dataArray.Add("1");

            dataArray.Sort();

            GetDistinctArrayList(dataArray, 0);
}

private void GetDistinctArrayList(ArrayList arr, int idx)

{

            int count = 0;

            if (idx >= arr.Count) return;

            string val = arr[idx].ToString();
            foreach (String s in arr)
            {
                if (s.Equals(arr[idx]))
                {
                    count++;
                }
            }

            if (count > 1)
            {
                arr.Remove(val);
                GetDistinctArrayList(arr, idx);
            }
            else
            {
                idx += 1;
                GetDistinctArrayList(arr, idx);
            }
        }
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protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    string a = "a;b;c;d;e;v";
    string[] b = a.Split(';');
    string[] c = b.Distinct().ToArray();

    if (b.Length != c.Length)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < b.Length; i++)
        {
            try
            {
                if (b[i].ToString() != c[i].ToString())
                {
                    Response.Write("Found duplicate " + b[i].ToString());
                    return;
                }
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                Response.Write("Found duplicate " + b[i].ToString());
                return;
            }
        }              
    }
    else
    {
        Response.Write("No duplicate ");
    }
}
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Maybe hashset which do not store duplicate elements and silently ignore requests to add duplicates.

static void Main()
        {
            string textWithDuplicates = "aaabbcccggg";     

            Console.WriteLine(textWithDuplicates.Count());  
            var letters = new HashSet<char>(textWithDuplicates);
            Console.WriteLine(letters.Count());

            foreach (char c in letters) Console.Write(c);
            Console.WriteLine("");

            int[] array = new int[] { 12, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2 };


            Console.WriteLine(array.Count());
            var distinctArray = new HashSet<int>(array);
            Console.WriteLine(distinctArray.Count());

            foreach (int i in distinctArray) Console.Write(i + ",");
        }
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Add all the strings to a dictionary and get the Keys property afterwards. This will produce each unique string, but not necessarily in the same order your original input had them in.

If you require the end result to have the same order as the original input, when you consider the first occurance of each string, use the following algorithm instead:

  1. Have a list (final output) and a dictionary (to check for duplicates)
  2. For each string in the input, check if it exists in the dictionary already
  3. If not, add it both to the dictionary and to the list

At the end, the list contains the first occurance of each unique string.

Make sure you consider things like culture and such when constructing your dictionary, to make sure you handle duplicates with accented letters correctly.

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The following tested and working code will remove duplicates from an array. You must include the System.Collections namespace.

string[] sArray = {"a", "b", "b", "c", "c", "d", "e", "f", "f"};
var sList = new ArrayList();

for (int i = 0; i < sArray.Length; i++) {
    if (sList.Contains(sArray[i]) == false) {
        sList.Add(sArray[i]);
    }
}

var sNew = sList.ToArray();

for (int i = 0; i < sNew.Length; i++) {
    Console.Write(sNew[i]);
}

You could wrap this up into a function if you wanted to.

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List<String> myStringList = new List<string>();
foreach (string s in myStringArray)
{
    if (!myStringList.Contains(s))
    {
        myStringList.Add(s);
    }
}

This is O(n^2), which won't matter for a short list which is going to be stuffed into a combo, but could be rapidly be a problem on a big collection.

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Here is a O(n*n) approach that uses O(1) space.

void removeDuplicates(char* strIn)
{
    int numDups = 0, prevIndex = 0;
    if(NULL != strIn && *strIn != '\0')
    {
    	int len = strlen(strIn);
    	for(int i = 0; i < len; i++)
    	{
    		bool foundDup = false;
    		for(int j = 0; j < i; j++)
    		{
    			if(strIn[j] == strIn[i])
    			{
    				foundDup = true;
    				numDups++;
    				break;
    			}
    		}

    		if(foundDup == false)
    		{
    			strIn[prevIndex] = strIn[i];
    			prevIndex++;
    		}
    	}

    	strIn[len-numDups] = '\0';
    }
}

The hash/linq approaches above are what you would generally use in real life. However in interviews they usually want to put some constraints e.g. constant space which rules out hash or no internal api - which rules out using LINQ.

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How can it ever use O(1) space, when you have to store the entire list? By starting with an inplace sort, you can do O(nlogn) time and O(n) memory, with much less code. –  Thomas Ahle Apr 27 '10 at 5:19
    
What makes you think it is storing the entire list? It is indeed doing in-place. And though not a condition in the question, my code maintains the order of characters in the original string. Sorting will remove that. –  Sesh Apr 30 '10 at 6:10

Tested the below & it works. What's cool is that it does a culture sensitive search too

class RemoveDuplicatesInString
{
    public static String RemoveDups(String origString)
    {
        String outString = null;
        int readIndex = 0;
        CompareInfo ci = CultureInfo.CurrentCulture.CompareInfo;


        if(String.IsNullOrEmpty(origString))
        {
            return outString;
        }

        foreach (var ch in origString)
        {
            if (readIndex == 0)
            {
                outString = String.Concat(ch);
                readIndex++;
                continue;
            }

            if (ci.IndexOf(origString, ch.ToString().ToLower(), 0, readIndex) == -1)
            {
                //Unique char as this char wasn't found earlier.
                outString = String.Concat(outString, ch);                   
            }

            readIndex++;

        }


        return outString;
    }


    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        String inputString = "aAbcefc";
        String outputString;

        outputString = RemoveDups(inputString);

        Console.WriteLine(outputString);
    }

}

--AptSenSDET

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Use the Distinct extension method.

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NOTE : NOT tested!

string[] test(string[] myStringArray)
{
    List<String> myStringList = new List<string>();
    foreach (string s in myStringArray)
    {
        if (!myStringList.Contains(s))
        {
            myStringList.Add(s);
        }
    }
    return myStringList.ToString();
}

Might do what you need...

EDIT Argh!!! beaten to it by rob by under a minute!

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Rob didn't beat you to anything. He's using ArrayList, while you're using List. Your version is better. –  Doug S Oct 27 '12 at 5:05

This code 100% remove duplicate values from an array[as I used a[i]].....You can convert it in any OO language..... :)

for(int i=0;i<size;i++)
{
    for(int j=i+1;j<size;j++)
    {
        if(a[i] == a[j])
        {
            for(int k=j;k<size;k++)
            {
                 a[k]=a[k+1];
            }
            j--;
            size--;
        }
    }

}
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