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I have implemented serial and parallel algorithm for solving linear systems using jacobi method. Both implementations converge and give correct solutions.

I am having trouble with understanding:

  1. How can parallel implementation converge after so low number of iterations compared to serial (same method is used in both). Am I facing some concurrency issues that I am not aware of?
  2. How can number of iterations vary from run to run in parallel implementation (6,7)?

Thanks!

Program output:

Mathematica solution: {{-1.12756}, {4.70371}, {-1.89272}, {1.56218}}
Serial: iterations=7194 , error=false, solution=[-1.1270591, 4.7042074, -1.8922218, 1.5626835]
Parallel: iterations=6 , error=false, solution=[-1.1274619, 4.7035804, -1.8927546, 1.5621948]

Code:

Main

import java.util.Arrays;

public class Main {

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        Serial s = new Serial();
        Parallel p = new Parallel(2);

        s.solve();
        p.solve();

        System.out.println("Mathematica solution: {{-1.12756}, {4.70371}, {-1.89272}, {1.56218}}");
        System.out.println(String.format("Serial: iterations=%d , error=%s, solution=%s", s.iter, s.errorFlag, Arrays.toString(s.data.solution)));
        System.out.println(String.format("Parallel: iterations=%d , error=%s, solution=%s", p.iter, p.errorFlag, Arrays.toString(p.data.solution)));


    }

}

Data

public class Data {

    public float A[][] = {{2.886139567217389f, 0.9778259187352214f, 0.9432146432722157f, 0.9622157488990459f}
                        ,{0.3023479007910952f,0.7503803506938734f,0.06163831478699766f,0.3856445043958068f}
                        ,{0.4298384105199724f,  0.7787439716945019f,    1.838686110345417f, 0.6282668788698587f}
                        ,{0.27798718418255075f, 0.09021764079496353f,   0.8765867330141233f,    1.246036349549629f}};

    public float b[] = {1.0630309381779384f,3.674438173599066f,0.6796639099285651f,0.39831385324794155f};
    public int size = A.length;
    public float x[] = new float[size];
    public float solution[] = new float[size];


}

Parallel

import java.util.Arrays;

    public class Parallel {


        private final int workers;
        private float[] globalNorm;

        public int iter;
        public int maxIter = 1000000;
        public double epsilon = 1.0e-3;
        public boolean errorFlag = false;

        public Data data = new Data();

        public Parallel(int workers) {
            this.workers = workers;
            this.globalNorm = new float[workers];
            Arrays.fill(globalNorm, 0);
        }

        public void solve() {

            JacobiWorker[] threads = new JacobiWorker[workers];
            int batchSize = data.size / workers;

            float norm;

            do {


                for(int i=0;i<workers;i++) {
                    threads[i] = new JacobiWorker(i,batchSize);
                    threads[i].start();
                }

                for(int i=0;i<workers;i++)
                    try {

                        threads[i].join();

                    } catch (InterruptedException e) {

                        e.printStackTrace();
                    }

                // At this point all worker calculations are done!

                norm = 0;

                for (float d : globalNorm) if (d > norm) norm = d;

                if (norm < epsilon)
                    errorFlag = false; // Converged
                else
                    errorFlag = true; // No desired convergence

            } while (norm >= epsilon && ++iter <= maxIter);

        }

        class JacobiWorker extends Thread {

            private final int idx;
            private final int batchSize;

            JacobiWorker(int idx, int batchSize) {
                this.idx = idx;
                this.batchSize = batchSize;
            }

            @Override
            public void run() {

                int upper = idx == workers - 1 ? data.size : (idx + 1) * batchSize;

                float localNorm = 0, diff = 0;

                for (int j = idx * batchSize; j < upper; j++) { // For every
                                                                // equation in batch

                    float s = 0;
                    for (int i = 0; i < data.size; i++) { // For every variable in
                                                            // equation

                        if (i != j)
                            s += data.A[j][i] * data.x[i];

                        data.solution[j] = (data.b[j] - s) / data.A[j][j];

                    }


                    diff = Math.abs(data.solution[j] - data.x[j]);
                    if (diff > localNorm) localNorm = diff;
                    data.x[j] = data.solution[j];


                }


                globalNorm[idx] = localNorm;

            }

        }

    }

Serial

public class Serial {

    public int iter;
    public int maxIter = 1000000;
    public double epsilon = 1.0e-3;
    public boolean errorFlag = false;

    public Data data = new Data();

    public void solve() {

        float norm,diff=0;

        do {


            for(int i=0;i<data.size;i++) {

                float s=0;  
                for (int j = 0; j < data.size; j++) {
                    if (i != j)
                        s += data.A[i][j] * data.x[j];
                    data.solution[i] = (data.b[i] - s) / data.A[i][i];
                }
            }


            norm = 0;

            for (int i=0;i<data.size;i++) {
                diff = Math.abs(data.solution[i]-data.x[i]); // Calculate convergence
                if (diff > norm) norm = diff;
                data.x[i] = data.solution[i];
            }


            if (norm < epsilon)
                errorFlag = false; // Converged
            else
                errorFlag = true; // No desired convergence


        } while (norm >= epsilon && ++iter <= maxIter);

    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
what happens with 1 worker? (first thing to do is make sure 1 worker is identical to single thread) –  andrew cooke Mar 12 '12 at 19:27
    
With 1 worker number of iterations does not change from run to run - it's always 6. –  1osmi Mar 12 '12 at 19:36
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think its a matter of implementation and not parallelization. Look at what happens with Parallel p = new Parallel(1);

Mathematica solution: {{-1.12756}, {4.70371}, {-1.89272}, {1.56218}}
Serial: iterations=7194 , error=false, solution=[-1.1270591, 4.7042074, -1.8922218, 1.5626835]
Parallel: iterations=6 , error=false, solution=[-1.1274619, 4.7035804, -1.8927546, 1.5621948]

As it turns out - your second implementation is not doing exactly the same thing as your first one.

I added this into your parallel version and it ran in the same number of iterations.

for (int i = idx * batchSize; i < upper; i++) {
    diff = Math.abs(data.solution[i] - data.x[i]); // Calculate
        // convergence
        if (diff > localNorm)
            localNorm = diff;
            data.x[i] = data.solution[i];
        }
}
share|improve this answer
    
My reasoning is: program has to do n calculations in either implementation before solution error is evaluated and iter incremented. In parallel impl. this is done in parallel and therefore takes less time. But iter should be incremented equal number of times regardless of implementation. –  1osmi Mar 12 '12 at 19:50
    
@1osmi I jumped the gun with my initial reasoning. But this operation is causing your serial version to run an extra 7000 times. Put this in (and replace the existing code for) your parallel version and you should see the right numbers. –  John Vint Mar 12 '12 at 19:54
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