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I'm learning to think and code in haskell. The game of "smallest number wins": n people take their bets on numbers between 1 and n, and the smallest number with only one bet wins.

I'm calculating all possible series of bets for n=10 and counting the winner numbers. Yes, this code does not do exactly that, but thats not my point here, but my code, which runs out of memory relatively fast.

(added comments - sorry!)

import Data.Array
import Data.List

f xs = flip map [1..10] $ flip (:) xs
p 1 = f []
p n =  concat $ map f $ p (n-1)
--the above, (p n) generates the list of all possible [a1, a2, ..., an] lists, where ai=1..10
--p 2 = [[1,1],[2,1],[3,1],[4,1],[5,1],...,[10,10]

--my first shot at the countidens function, the functionality stays the same with the other
--countidens2 xs = map (\x->(head x, length x)) $ group $ sort xs

countidens' xs = accumArray (+) 0 (1,10) $ zip xs $ repeat 1
countidens xs = filter ((/=) 0 . snd) $ zip [1..10] $ map ((countidens' xs)!) [1..10]
--counts the number of occurrences of each number (1..10) in a list
--countidens [1,1,1,2,2,3] = (1,3),(2,2),(3,1)]
--(the above, countidens2 is much easier to understand)

numlist n = map (flip (++) ([(0,0)])) $ map countidens $ p n
--maps countidens on the (p n) list, and attaches a dummy (0,0) to the end (this is needed later)

g (x, (y, z)) | (x==y) && (z==1)    = True
              | (x < y)             = True
              | (y==0)              = True
              | otherwise           = False
-- filter function for [(a, (a,a)] lists - (a1, (a1, a)) -> Bool

winners n = map fst $ map (head . filter g) $ map (zip [1..]) $ numlist n
-- extracts the number of the first element of (numlist n) that qualifies as g
--    for each element of g (note: these are results of the countidens function, since that was mapped)
-- the dummy (0,0) was needed so there's always one that does

winnernumsarr n = accumArray (+) 0 (1,10) $ flip zip (repeat 1) $ winners n
-- winners n produces a simple list of integers (1..10) that is 10^n long, this (winnernumsarr) accumulates the number of each integer, much like countidens did
-- (but does not produce a fancy output)

main = putStrLn $ show $ winnernumsarr 7 -- aiming for 10! even 8 runs out of memory on my machine

While I know this code does not do exactly what I'd like it to do, what's more important is that this is not the first time I've run into "out of memory" issues with haskell, and with problems I know could be written in C++ with a tiny amount of memory used.

There must be a way - but how?

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1  
It might help if you annotated each function with a type and gave it a comment describing what it's supposed to do –  Kevin Ballard Mar 12 '12 at 20:02

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Two things are important here. Type signatures and unboxed arrays.

module Main (main) where

import Data.Array.Unboxed
import Data.List

f xs = flip map [1..10] $ flip (:) xs
p 1 = f []
p n =  concat $ map f $ p (n-1)

--my first shot at the countidens function, the functionality stays the same with the other
--countidens2 xs = map (\x->(head x, length x)) $ group $ sort xs

countidens' :: [Int] -> UArray Int Int
countidens' xs = accumArray (+) 0 (1,10) $ zip xs $ repeat 1

countidens xs = filter ((/=) 0 . snd) $ assocs (countidens' xs)

numlist n = map (flip (++) ([(0,0)])) $ map countidens $ p n

g (x, (y, z)) | (x==y) && (z==1)    = True
              | (x < y)             = True
              | (y==0)              = True
              | otherwise           = False

winners n = map fst $ map (head . filter g) $ map (zip [1..]) $ numlist n

winnernumsarr :: Int -> UArray Int Int
winnernumsarr n = accumArray (+) 0 (1,10) $ flip zip (repeat 1) $ winners n
main = putStrLn $ show $ winnernumsarr 7

runs in small space, although quite slow (takes about 50 seconds for 8, 4.9 seconds for 7).

When you're using boxed arrays, the accumArray doesn't write plain numbers to the array, but thunks. In winnernumsarr, the thunks become huge. That takes a lot of memory and requires a lot of stack space to evaluate at the end. Using unboxed arrays, the additions are performed as they come, not building huge thunks.

The type signatures are necessary to fix the type of array to be printed and to make all occurring number types Int for less allocation and higher speed.

A more idiomatic version, without changing the algorithm, is

module Main (main) where

import Data.Array.Unboxed
import Data.List

p :: Int -> [[Int]]
p 0 = [[]]
p n = [k:xs | xs <- p (n-1), k <- [1 .. 10]]

countidens' :: [Int] -> UArray Int Int
countidens' xs = accumArray (+) 0 (1,10) $ map (\k -> (k,1)) xs

countidens :: [Int] -> [(Int,Int)]
countidens = filter ((/=) 0 . snd) . assocs . countidens'

numlist n = map ((++[(0,0)]) . countidens) $ p n

g :: (Int,(Int,Int)) -> Bool
g (x, (y, z)) | (x==y) && (z==1)    = True
              | (x < y)             = True
              | (y==0)              = True
              | otherwise           = False

winners :: Int -> [Int]
winners n = map fst $ map (head . filter g) $ map (zip [1..]) $ numlist n

winnernumsarr :: Int -> UArray Int Int
winnernumsarr n = accumArray (+) 0 (1,10) $ map (\k -> (k,1)) $ winners n

main :: IO ()
main = print $ winnernumsarr 7

which is also faster. A bit of the speedup comes from the fact that GHC can optimise this form of the list generating function p better, the bulk comes from replacing zip xs (repeat 1) with map (\k -> (k,1)) xs. I must admit that I don't understand why that makes such a big difference, but the zip has to match both lists with _ : _ while the map needs only match xs, which saves some work.

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Thanks! Works just fine. Running slow is less a problem, I can work on that still. Also I didn't know about the accocs - nice find in my messy code :) –  proto-n Mar 12 '12 at 20:46

I'm having a hard time understanding exactly what your code is doing, so instead I just wrote a function bets which takes the number of players and spits out a lazy list of all possible bets.

-- `bets n` calculates all possible sequences of bets with `n` players.
-- It returns a list of lists, each sub-list being `n` in length
bets :: Int -> [[Int]]
bets n = bets' n
  where bets' :: Int -> [[Int]] -- use separate function so we always have the total `n` available
        bets' n'
          | n' == 0 = [[]]
          | n' > 0  = concatMap step $ bets' (pred n')
          | otherwise = error "bets: negative number of players"
        step :: [Int] -> [[Int]]
        step bs = zipWith (:) [1..n] (repeat bs)

I tested it with n == 5, which works beautifully. I don't know what sort of performance you're expecting with n == 10 though, so it's possible this ends up being too slow for you.

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I would recommend that you switch from arrays, even unboxed arrays, to the Vector library. The interface is much richer, and the fusion-based implementation of vector can often result in performance benefits.

Here's an equivalent version using Vector, with some of Daniel Fisher's changes incorporated:

{-# LANGUAGE TupleSections #-}

import qualified Data.Vector.Unboxed as V
import Data.List

p :: Int -> [[Int]]
p 0 = [[]]
p n = [k:xs | xs <- p (n-1), k <- [1 .. 10]]

countidens' :: [Int] -> V.Vector Int
countidens' xs = V.accum (+) (V.replicate 11 0) $ map (,1) xs

countidens = V.filter ((/= 0) . snd) . V.indexed . countidens'

numlist = map ((`V.snoc` (0,0)) . countidens) . p

g (x, (y, z)) | (x==y) && (z==1)    = True
              | (x < y)             = True
              | (y==0)              = True
              | otherwise           = False

winners n = map (fst . V.head . V.filter g . V.imap (\ix a -> (ix+1,a)) ) $ numlist n
winnernumsarr :: Int -> V.Vector (Int,Int)
winnernumsarr n = V.tail . V.indexed $ V.accum (+) (V.replicate 11 0)
  $ flip zip (repeat 1) $ winners n
main = putStrLn $ show $ winnernumsarr 8

On my system, this cuts the runtime from 49s to 31s, with both programs compiled with "-O2 -msse2".

Two caveats: first, Vector implements vectors, so if you need multi-dimensional indexing you may want to stay with arrays. Secondly, vectors are 0-indexed, so you may need to make suitable adjustments to the rest of your code.

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Actually, accumArray uses mutable arrays. It's a runST stuff thing, no copying. –  Daniel Fischer Mar 12 '12 at 22:20
    
@DanielFischer - mea culpa, I was looking at outdated array code (array-0.2.0.0 for the record). That explains why the +RTS -s result wasn't what I expected, but not why vector remains faster. –  John L Mar 12 '12 at 23:29
    
The tuple sections. map (,1) xs is way faster than zip xs (repeat 1). Using that (or map (\k -> (k,1)) for those who don't want the extension), the UArray thing is faster than the Vector code here. I don't know why, but that's what a little experimenting showed. –  Daniel Fischer Mar 12 '12 at 23:47

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