Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an string that have an extra spaces string, for example:

char * s = "  foo    baa       ";

I want to conver it to:

foo baa

I have wrote this function:

void trim (char ** src)
    {
        char * p = strdup(* src);
        char * ret = malloc(strlen(*src) + 1);
                assert(ret != NULL);
        char * token;
        token = strtok(p, " \t");
        while( NULL != token ) {
            while (*token) {
                 *(ret ++) = *(token ++);
            }
            token = strtok(NULL, " \t");
        }

        printf("ret = %s\n", ret);
    }

but it given for me an empty string from ret variable value. someone may point out my mistake? thanks in advance.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You are incrementing ret in your while, store the original address or use subscript to access different chars of ret.

    // snip
    char * ret = malloc(strlen(*src) + 1);
            assert(ret != NULL);
    char * ret_start = ret;
    //snap
    printf("ret_start = %s\n", ret_start);
share|improve this answer
    
+1. After the loop ends, ret points at the terminating null character. –  Carl Norum Mar 12 '12 at 20:26
    
Thanks you! works fine. you have tips for improve this C code? –  user834697 Mar 12 '12 at 20:49
    
@CarlNorum: was typo. I did it in my real code. –  user834697 Mar 12 '12 at 20:50
    
Three points - may not be that important but whatever: 1. pass src as char * why do you need it as char **(but look at #3 before)? 2. why do you need p ? you can perform strtok on src 3. declare src as const char *`, it shouldn't be modified in the method anyway. –  MByD Mar 12 '12 at 20:52
    
@Binyamin: regarding #2: using strtok() on the passed in string isn't a good idea if the intent is that it shouldn't be modified, since strtok() drops '\0' characters into the string it's passed. –  Michael Burr Mar 12 '12 at 21:06

Other naive solution in c++(can be easily changed to c code )----- :)

initially count=0 and str-> your c++ string

for(i=0;i< str.size();i++)
{
        if(str[i]!=' ')
        {
                str[j++]=str[i];
                count=0;
        }
        else if(str[i]==' '&&count==0)
        {
                str[j++]=str[i];
                count =1;
        }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.