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Okay so I've managed to read in a .txt file... now I'm trying to figure the best way to convert this information into a 2D array.

My text file (first two number provide height and width):

5
5
0,0,0,0,0
0,0,0,0,0
0,0,1,0,0
0,1,1,1,0
1,1,1,1,1

My C# / XNA:

string fileContents = string.Empty;
try
{
    using (StreamReader reader = new StreamReader("Content/map.txt"))
    {
        fileContents = reader.ReadToEnd().ToString();
    }
}
catch (Exception e)
{
    Console.WriteLine(e.Message);
}

Now what I need to do next is define the size of the 2-dimensional map array and then populate the entry values... this is where I'm getting a bit stuck and have found various ways I can loop through the data but I don't think any of them have been terribly tidy.

What I've tried to do is have one loops which splits by newline... and then another loop which splits by comma delimiter.

Is this the best way to do it... or are there better alternatives?

share|improve this question
    
Sounds like you are on the right track. Perhaps try to use the extension methods e.g ToArray() –  Tom Mar 12 '12 at 20:45
    
@JohnSaunders Sorry, my mistake. –  diggersworld Mar 12 '12 at 20:53

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The code below doesn't require the first to rows in your sample .CSV file:

5
5

I'd prefer it this way, but as a consequence, the code below reads the file twice. It would take a small modification use the first two rows in your sample instead.

private int[,] LoadData(string inputFilePath)
{
  int[,] data = null;

  if (File.Exists(inputFilePath))
  {
    Dictionary<string, int> counts = GetRowAndColumnCounts(inputFilePath);

    int rowCount = counts["row_count"];
    int columnCount = counts["column_count"];

    data = new int[rowCount, columnCount];

    using (StreamReader sr = File.OpenText(inputFilePath))
    {
      string s = "";
      string[] split = null;

      for (int i = 0; (s = sr.ReadLine()) != null; i++)
      {
        split = s.Split(new char[] { ',' }, StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries);

        for (int j = 0; j < columnCount; j++)
        {
          data[i, j] = int.Parse(split[j]);
        }
      }
    }
  }
  else
  {
    throw new FileDoesNotExistException("Input file does not exist");
  }

  return data;
}

private Dictionary<string, int> GetRowAndColumnCounts(string inputFilePath)
{
  int rowCount = 0;
  int columnCount = 0;

  if (File.Exists(inputFilePath))
  {
    using (StreamReader sr = File.OpenText(inputFilePath))
    {
      string[] split = null;
      int lineCount = 0;

      for (string s = sr.ReadLine(); s != null; s = sr.ReadLine())
      {
        split = s.Split(new char[] { ',' }, StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries);

        if (columnCount == 0)
        {
          columnCount = split.Length;
        }

        lineCount++;
      }

      rowCount = lineCount;
    }

    if (rowCount == 0 || columnCount == 0)
    {
      throw new FileEmptyException("No input data");
    }
  }
  else
  {
    throw new FileDoesNotExistException("Input file does not exist");
  }

  Dictionary<string, int> counts = new Dictionary<string, int>();

  counts.Add("row_count", rowCount);
  counts.Add("column_count", columnCount);

  return counts;
}
share|improve this answer
2  
That looks a bit lengthy... check out my solution. –  diggersworld Mar 12 '12 at 21:17
    
Yes you made the modification that I mentioned. Putting height and width in the first 2 rows eliminates the need for the 2nd function. However, I don't like the format of the input file your way. It's a preference thing. –  JohnB Mar 12 '12 at 21:25
    
Mmmm... I can understand... once it gets big its hard to count the number of columns etc... so automation there would help. –  diggersworld Mar 12 '12 at 21:40

It can be done with LINQ but that is only practical when you want (accept) an array-of-array, int[][] instead of a straight 2-dimensional int[,] .

int[][] data = 
    File.ReadLines(fileName)
    .Skip(2)
    .Select(l => l.Split(',').Select(n => int.Parse(n)).ToArray())
    .ToArray();
share|improve this answer
    
Is this what is referred to as "jagged" arrays? –  diggersworld Mar 12 '12 at 21:45
    
Yes, but I prefer array of arrays –  Henk Holterman Mar 12 '12 at 21:47
    
PS: I'm not sure if all this (ReadLines) is available in XNA. Missed that tag. –  Henk Holterman Mar 12 '12 at 21:54
    
+1, I love the LINQ but dislike the [][] in this case. –  JohnB Mar 12 '12 at 21:56
    
There's Readline() which does them one by one I think. I haven't come across a plural version though. –  diggersworld Mar 12 '12 at 21:57

Here's the solution I've come up with which appears to work.

int[,] txtmap;
int height = 0;
int width = 0;
string fileContents = string.Empty;

try
{
    using (StreamReader reader = new StreamReader("Content/map.txt"))
    {
        fileContents = reader.ReadToEnd().ToString();
    }
}
catch (Exception e)
{
    Console.WriteLine(e.Message);
}

string[] parts = fileContents.Split(new string[] { "\r\n" }, StringSplitOptions.None);
for (int i = 0; i < parts.Length; i++)
{
    if (i == 0)
    {
        // set width
        width = Int16.Parse(parts[i]);
    }
    else if (i == 1)
    {
        // set height
        height = Int16.Parse(parts[i]);

        txtmap = new int[width, height];
    }

    if (i > 1)
    {
        // loop through tiles and assign them as needed
        string[] tiles = parts[i].Split(new string[] { "," }, StringSplitOptions.None);
        for (int j = 0; j < tiles.Length; j++)
        {
            txtmap[i - 2, j] = Int16.Parse(tiles[j]);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
2  
That looks a bit lengthy... check out my solution. –  Henk Holterman Mar 12 '12 at 21:48

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