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Is there any reason why Crockford recommends using the else statement on the same line as the curly bracet?

if (condition) {
    statements
} else {
    statements
}
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7 Answers 7

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It just looks nicer than:

if(condition){
    statements
}
else {
    statements
}

plus it ties in the if and the else together logically so it's easier to read.

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1  
Exactly, I would say it's a consequence of using the "braces on the same line" style and the fact the alternative just looks wrong because else can't appear by itself so it might as well be tied to the if it belongs to. –  nwellcome Mar 12 '12 at 21:12

It's just a matter of style. He probably wants to save a linebreak to make the code more compact.

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The only reason is readability--it's easier to tell that the statements are related. Otherwise it's just a matter of preference (unlike, e.g., positioning of braces after a return statement).

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I'm guessing because of Section 7.4 of Sun's Java standards document. This is the recommended format that Sun suggests, and he kept the same format for his JavaScript recommendations.

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Just FYI, java and javascript are not the same language. –  Dustin Graham Mar 12 '12 at 21:08
2  
I did not say (or imply) that they are. Crawford's document "is inspired by" Sun's documentation, and if you looks at Sun's docs you will see the formatting is exactly the same for If...Else statements. –  Matt Mar 12 '12 at 21:10
1  
Oops, forgot the <sarcasm></sarcasm> tags. :) See my answer below. –  Dustin Graham Mar 12 '12 at 21:12
1  
:) ha, SO should give that tag to us! –  Matt Mar 12 '12 at 21:13

My boss does the same thing, I still don't really know why. It's just formatting..

It's EXACTLY the same as:

if(condition){statements}else{statements}

There's no different in speed or anything, just preference on your formatting style.

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Actually, I think the reason is because of "implicit semicolon insertion, always start your curly braces on the same line as whatever they're opening."

Google's JavaScript Style Guide

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It's a coding convention, just an agreed style.

if (condition) {
    // statements
}
else
{
    // other statements
}

The above is just as valid a coding convention. Just not the one Crockford decided on.

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