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The Windows Hosts file allows you to associate an IP to a host name that has far greater freedom than a normal Internet domain name. I'd like to create a function that determines if a given name would be a valid "host" file domain name.

Based on this answer and experimentation of what works and doesn't, I came up with this function:

private static bool IsValidDomainName(string domain)
{
    if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(domain) || domain.Length > 255)
    {
    	return false;
    }

    Uri uri;

    if (!Uri.TryCreate("http://" + domain, UriKind.Absolute, out uri))
    {
    	return false;
    }

    if (!String.Equals(uri.Host, domain, StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase) || !uri.IsWellFormedOriginalString())
    {
    	return false;
    }

    foreach (string part in uri.Host.Split('.'))
    {
    	if (part.Length > 63)
    	{
    		return false;
    	}
    }

    return true;
}

It also has the benefit that it should work with Unicode names (where a basic regex would fail).

Is there a better/more elegant way to do this?

UPDATE: As suggested by Bill, the Uri.CheckHostName method almost does what I want, but it doesn't allow for host names like "-test" that Windows allows in a "hosts" file. I would special case the "-" part, but I'm concerned there are more special cases.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 12 down vote accepted

How about:

	private static bool IsValidDomainName(string name)
	{
		return Uri.CheckHostName(name) != UriHostNameType.Unknown;
	}

Why do the work yourself?

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Note that even passing null or empty string returns the correct answer. –  Bill Jun 9 '09 at 0:07
    
I hadn't seen this method before. I missed it in my Reflector-ing. It's better than my "http" prefix hack, but the hosts file allows "-test" for a name, but this function says it's invalid. –  Jeff Moser Jun 9 '09 at 0:15
    
The "http" prefix hack correctly allows the "-test" case, but just using Uri.CheckHostName does not allow it. –  Jeff Moser Jun 9 '09 at 0:18
    
I am not aware of all that is allowed in the hosts file, for example, "-test". –  Bill Jun 9 '09 at 10:15

These methods are not reliable as you get some response even if the domain name is fake like "fasdfasdfasd.com".

The best way is to send a WebResponse and wait for the response from the domain. Here is the complete code and explanations of this process (long code snippet so not copy-pasting here).

http://www.dotnetfunda.com/articles/show/1072/validating-domain-name-in-aspnet

Thanks

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