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I'm writing a library for C#. I'm wondering if it's possible to only have methods/fields available if the library is being used in a C# project, and if it is being used in another .NET language like Visual Basic the methods won't be accessible. The reason for this is because there are some functions/fields that are only useful for unsafe-code, and it would be a little bit silly if they were available for Visual Basic if they served no purpose.

Is it possible to only have certain classes/methods/fields available depending on the language of which they are being utilized in? If not I could easily just have 2 separate assemblies available for download, i.e. one for C# and one for VB.Net. Or I could simply include the extra methods regardless (but I would like to prevent confusion with those who aren't familiar with pointers and unsafe code, just to keep users from messing around with unsafe methods and accidentally doing something silly, but I guess it really doesn't matter!).

Thanks!

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unsafe code is not CLS compliant, meaning you wont be able to call into it from VB.Net. I have no idea about F#. So you'll only be preventing managed c++ people from using your pointers. This seems a little redundant. What are your aims? –  IanNorton Mar 12 '12 at 22:29
    
Interfaces. Interfaces. Interfaces. ;-) –  user166390 Mar 12 '12 at 22:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Is it possible to only have certain classes/methods/fields available depending on the language of which they are being utilized in?

No.

I would like to prevent confusion with those who aren't familiar with pointers and unsafe code, just to keep users from messing around with unsafe methods and accidentally doing something silly.

Use abstraction. Create an assembly with interfaces/base classes and give some consumers that assembly together with another with safe implementations and other consumers the base assembly together with another that exposes advanced functionality.

Alternatively, you could use one assembly with internal methods and use the InternalsVisibleToAttribute if you know which "advanced" assemblies will be consuming it.

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I don't see how the unsafe context has anything to do with using the assembly from another .NET language. Just out of curiosity, am I missing something (very possible...)? –  Ed S. Mar 12 '12 at 22:25
    
There is no way to do what was asked. I offered an alternative - give different assemblies (one with a reduced API) to different clients, depending on how much the clients are trusted, not on which .NET language they use. –  Danny Varod Mar 12 '12 at 22:30
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Oh no, I realize that. What I am asking is what about the unsafe context would render an assembly unusable by other .NET languages (as the OP thinks it does)? –  Ed S. Mar 12 '12 at 22:36
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@EdS. I don't think unsafe code would render my assembly unusable by other languages. I was just wondering if it was possible to specify whether certain assembly members can be used in certain languages. There are some functions and fields in some of my classes that would be useless in other languages besides C#, but it really doesn't matter, I was just interested to see whether it was possible or not. :) –  Alex Mar 12 '12 at 22:39

As far as I know there's no way to determine the language of an assembly calling into one of yours, since by the time that happens everyone is talking IL anyway (or rather compiled instructions but whatever).

I think your best bet in this case would be to compile two different versions of the assembly based on conditionals, and provide them to your users depending on what language they're using. Or you could just include all the code and tell your VB users not to access some features.

I must admit I'm not sure what you could be doing here that would expose unsafe anythings to callers; some IntPtr's or something?

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IntPtr's are a good idea. –  Alex Mar 12 '12 at 22:32

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