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I get this erorr: VC++ -- This declaration has not storage class or type specifier in the line:

towerControl.push_back() = new Boeing;

Can somebody point out what's going wrong? Thanks.

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;

class Aircraft {
public:
    virtual void disp() { cout << "I'm an aircraft\n"; }
    virtual ~Aircraft() { cout << "Aircraft::Destructor\n"; }
};

class Boeing: public Aircraft {
public:
    void disp() { cout << "I'm a Boeing\n"; }
    ~Boeing() { cout << "Boeing::Destructor\n"; }
};

class Airbus: public Aircraft {
public:
    void disp() { cout << "I'm an Airbus\n"; }
    ~Airbus() { cout << "Airbus::Destructor\n"; }
};

class Tower {
public:
    vector <Aircraft*> towerControl;
    towerControl.push_back() = new Boeing;
    towerControl.push_back() = new Airbus;
    ~Tower() { cout << "Tower::Destructor\n"; }
};

int main() {
    Tower T;
}
share|improve this question
    
What you need is a good book to start with. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Mar 13 '12 at 2:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Sure. The syntax is wrong. It should be:

towerControl.push_back(new Boeing);

And you also need to call it inside a member of Tower, possibly a constructor:

class Tower {
public:
    vector <Aircraft*> towerControl;
    Tower()
    {
       towerControl.push_back(new Boeing);
       towerControl.push_back(new Airbus);
    }
    ~Tower() { cout << "Tower::Destructor\n"; }
};

Seems to me like you need to start learning the basics of C++.

share|improve this answer
towerControl.push_back() = new Boeing;
towerControl.push_back() = new Airbus;

The push_back() function of vector does not return anything. All it does is accept a parameter to be pushed into the vector. So you are literally setting nothing in the push_back() statement.

towerControl.push_back(new Boeing);
towerControl.push_back(new Airbus);

Should work just fine.

PS: Is assignment at that part of the class declaration possible? Err....

share|improve this answer
    
Not really. You can't just write statements in the class definition and expect them to work. They need to be in context. See my answer. –  Luchian Grigore Mar 12 '12 at 23:26
    
@LuchianGrigore: Edited :) Editing took time. –  Ajai Mar 12 '12 at 23:27

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