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I am trying to create a list of dictionaries using shakespeare's sonnets.

I want to create something like this:

list[0] == 'Sonnet 1', how do I get 'Sonnet 1' to be the key of the actual sonnet?

http://www.shakespeares-sonnets.com/sonnet/1 for more info on sonnets.

I saved the sonnets into a file in this format:

SONNET 1

From fairest creatures we desire increase, That thereby beauty's rose might never die, But as the riper should by time decease, His tender heir might bear his memory: But thou, contracted to thine own bright eyes, Feed'st thy light's flame with self-substantial fuel, Making a famine where abundance lies, Thyself thy foe, to thy sweet self too cruel. Thou that art now the world's fresh ornament And only herald to the gaudy spring, Within thine own bud buriest thy content And, tender churl, makest waste in niggarding. Pity the world, or else this glutton be, To eat the world's due, by the grave and thee.

SONNET 2

When forty winters shall beseige thy brow, And dig deep trenches in thy beauty's field, Thy youth's proud livery, so gazed on now, Will be a tatter'd weed, of small worth held: Then being ask'd where all thy beauty lies, Where all the treasure of thy lusty days, To say, within thine own deep-sunken eyes, Were an all-eating shame and thriftless praise. How much more praise deserved thy beauty's use, If thou couldst answer 'This fair child of mine Shall sum my count and make my old excuse,' Proving his beauty by succession thine! This were to be new made when thou art old, And see thy blood warm when thou feel'st it cold.

and so on...

initially I used split("\n\n"), so the list would look like ['Sonnet 1', 'content of sonnet 1', 'Sonnet 2', 'content of sonnet 2', ...]

then, I use a for loop to (try to) make list[0] == ['title'] : 'Sonnet 1',['sonnet'] : 'content of sonnet 1'], list[1] will be of sonnet 2, and so on..

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3  
What does your input data look like? What should each list element represent and what should each dictionary contain? Please be more specific and show what you have already tried. –  Mike Mar 13 '12 at 0:05
2  
+1 for posting a link about sonnets haha. dict = {'Sonnet 1':'A SONNET AND STUFF' } –  prelic Mar 13 '12 at 0:06
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use this trick to iterate through the results of the split pairwise

zip(*[iter(sonnets.split("\n\n"))]*2)

eg.

>>> sonnets = "SONNET 1\n\nFrom fairest creatures we desire increase, That thereby beauty's rose might never die, But as the riper should by time decease, His tender heir might bear his memory: But thou, contracted to thine own bright eyes, Feed'st thy light's flame with self-substantial fuel, Making a famine where abundance lies, Thyself thy foe, to thy sweet self too cruel. Thou that art now the world's fresh ornament And only herald to the gaudy spring, Within thine own bud buriest thy content And, tender churl, makest waste in niggarding. Pity the world, or else this glutton be, To eat the world's due, by the grave and thee.\n\nSONNET 2\n\nWhen forty winters shall beseige thy brow, And dig deep trenches in thy beauty's field, Thy youth's proud livery, so gazed on now, Will be a tatter'd weed, of small worth held: Then being ask'd where all thy beauty lies, Where all the treasure of thy lusty days, To say, within thine own deep-sunken eyes, Were an all-eating shame and thriftless praise. How much more praise deserved thy beauty's use, If thou couldst answer 'This fair child of mine Shall sum my count and make my old excuse,' Proving his beauty by succession thine! This were to be new made when thou art old, And see thy blood warm when thou feel'st it cold."
>>> L=[{'title':title, 'content': content} for title, content in zip(*[iter(sonnets.split("\n\n"))]*2)]
>>> L[0]['title']
'SONNET 1'
>>> L[0]['content']
"From fairest creatures we desire increase, That thereby beauty's rose might never die, But as the riper should by time decease, His tender heir might bear his memory: But thou, contracted to thine own bright eyes, Feed'st thy light's flame with self-substantial fuel, Making a famine where abundance lies, Thyself thy foe, to thy sweet self too cruel. Thou that art now the world's fresh ornament And only herald to the gaudy spring, Within thine own bud buriest thy content And, tender churl, makest waste in niggarding. Pity the world, or else this glutton be, To eat the world's due, by the grave and thee."
>>> L[1]['title']
'SONNET 2'
>>> L[1]['content']
"When forty winters shall beseige thy brow, And dig deep trenches in thy beauty's field, Thy youth's proud livery, so gazed on now, Will be a tatter'd weed, of small worth held: Then being ask'd where all thy beauty lies, Where all the treasure of thy lusty days, To say, within thine own deep-sunken eyes, Were an all-eating shame and thriftless praise. How much more praise deserved thy beauty's use, If thou couldst answer 'This fair child of mine Shall sum my count and make my old excuse,' Proving his beauty by succession thine! This were to be new made when thou art old, And see thy blood warm when thou feel'st it cold."
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that is NEAT!!! exactly what i wanted, thanks a lot!! –  Joe Chen Mar 13 '12 at 0:36
    
@Joe, you're most welcome –  gnibbler Mar 13 '12 at 0:46
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It sounds like you just want a plain old dict, not a list of dictionaries.

sonnet = '''From fairest creatures we desire increase,
That thereby beauty's rose might never die,
But as the riper should by time decease,
His tender heir might bear his memory:
But thou contracted to thine own bright eyes,
Feed'st thy light's flame with self-substantial fuel,
Making a famine where abundance lies,
Thy self thy foe, to thy sweet self too cruel:
Thou that art now the world's fresh ornament,
And only herald to the gaudy spring,
Within thine own bud buriest thy content,
And, tender churl, mak'st waste in niggarding:
Pity the world, or else this glutton be,
To eat the world's due, by the grave and thee.'''

# create with dict constructor
shakespeares_sonnets = {'Sonnet 1': sonnet, 'Sonnet 2': 'etc....'}

# add new ones later
shakespeares_sonnets['Sonnet N'] = 'Yo dawg, I herd u like sonnets...'

# easy to make lists out of the dict
list_of_sonnet_titles = shakespeares_sonnets.keys()
list_of_sonnets = shakespeares_sonnets.values()
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From what I can tell, you really just need a simple dict

my_sonnets = {}
my_sonnets['Sonnet 1'] = 'The sonnet text'

If you're still certain you want a list of dicts (where each dict is representing a single sonnet with multiple "attributes" like title/text/author/etc), then I strongly urge you to consider a class instead.

class Sonnet(object):
    def __init__(self, title, text='', author=''):
        self.title = title
        self.text = text
        self.author = author

#Create a sonnet and set the author later
sonnet1 = Sonnet('Sonnet #1', 'Some text')
sonnet1.author = 'Mr. Bob'

#Create a sonnet specifying all fields
sonnet2 = Sonnet('Sonnet #2', 'Some other text', 'Ms. Sally')

#Creating a list from the sonnets above
my_list = [sonnet1, sonnet2]


#Alternatively, create the list in place
my_list = [Sonnet('Sonnet #1', 'Some text'), Sonnet('Sonnet #2', 'Some other text', 'Ms. Sally')]
#Set the author on the first item after the fact if you so choose
my_list[0].author = 'Mr. Bob'

Finally, if you're dead set on using the wrong data structure for the stated question...

my_list = [{'title':'Sonnet1', 'text':'Blah'}, {'title':'Sonnet2', 'text':'more blah', 'author':'Ms. Sally'}]
my_list[0]['author'] = 'Mr. Bob'
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this is a list? sorry im beginner at python. –  Joe Chen Mar 13 '12 at 0:12
    
@JoeChen, please read this before you continue trying to solve this problem. ;-) (And no, the above example is a dict, which everyone is saying - and I agree - is probably really what you want.) –  Mike Mar 13 '12 at 0:23
    
@JoeChen, Added a couple other ways to approach this as well. –  gfortune Mar 13 '12 at 0:39
    
@gfortune thanks for the tip!! reason i went gnibbler's answer is because after creating that list of 20 dicts i would choose 5 random out of the list and display them on a webpage etc. maybe that bit of info would help a bit lols –  Joe Chen Mar 13 '12 at 0:47
    
Yep, more info always means less guessing. Regardless of the answer you accepted, please consider creating a class for Sonnet to make your code easier to decipher down the road. You'll also find it far more flexible if you end up adding data validation and additional features (calculation functions/etc) to the class. –  gfortune Mar 13 '12 at 0:55
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