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Basically i want to use System.Security.Cryptography.AesManaged (or a better class, if you think there is one?) to take one byte array and create another encrypted byte array, using a given symmetric key (i assume i'll need one?).

I also will need the way to reverse this procedure.

The point of this is so i can encrypt stored passwords. I assume there's a simple way to do this?

Thanks

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4 Answers 4

Simple encrypting and decrypting data in C#.

Edit: For passwords, I would recommend using BCrypt instead of doing a two-way encryption, unless you really need to recover the original password. Normally you just need the fact that someone knew the password, not the password itself.

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Looks good, but what's an IV ? I thought i'd just need a 16-byte key? –  Chris Jun 9 '09 at 1:47
    
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Initialization_vector. You can increase the strength if you put random stuff in there, but you could use zeros too. –  Eugene Yokota Jun 9 '09 at 1:55
    
I need the passwords to pass them on to another service. –  Chris Jun 9 '09 at 3:32

There is a pretty nice C# implementation of symmetric key encryption at http://www.superstarcoders.com/blogs/posts/symmetric-encryption-in-c-sharp.aspx . It supports AES, Triple DES, and Rijndael. It has easy to follow functions in the form:

 string Encrypt(string plaintext, string password, string salt)
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Here's what i did in the end, inspired by (an older version of) michael's answer:

private string Encrypt(string input)
{
  return Convert.ToBase64String(Encrypt(Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(input)));
}
private byte[] Encrypt(byte[] input)
{
  PasswordDeriveBytes pdb = new PasswordDeriveBytes("hjiweykaksd", new byte[] { 0x43, 0x87, 0x23, 0x72, 0x45, 0x56, 0x68, 0x14, 0x62, 0x84 });
  MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream();
  Aes aes = new AesManaged();
  aes.Key = pdb.GetBytes(aes.KeySize / 8);
  aes.IV = pdb.GetBytes(aes.BlockSize / 8);
  CryptoStream cs = new CryptoStream(ms, aes.CreateEncryptor(), CryptoStreamMode.Write);
  cs.Write(input, 0, input.Length);
  cs.Close();
  return ms.ToArray();
}
private string Decrypt(string input)
{
  return Encoding.UTF8.GetString(Decrypt(Convert.FromBase64String(input)));
}
private byte[] Decrypt(byte[] input)
{
  PasswordDeriveBytes pdb = new PasswordDeriveBytes("hjiweykaksd", new byte[] { 0x43, 0x87, 0x23, 0x72, 0x45, 0x56, 0x68, 0x14, 0x62, 0x84 });
  MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream();
  Aes aes = new AesManaged();
  aes.Key = pdb.GetBytes(aes.KeySize / 8);
  aes.IV = pdb.GetBytes(aes.BlockSize / 8);
  CryptoStream cs = new CryptoStream(ms, aes.CreateDecryptor(), CryptoStreamMode.Write);
  cs.Write(input, 0, input.Length);
  cs.Close();
  return ms.ToArray();
}
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5  
Given your code above, you're going to end up with the same key every time, which is good, but you will also end up with the same IV every time, which is bad. I'm pretty sure that the IV should be specific to the data that you're encrypting, while the Key can be "global". –  John Bubriski Jan 30 '12 at 15:49

EDIT: Noticed eed3si9n's edit... I agree, symmetric encryption is a bad choice for passwords. Use hashes (and not MD5) instead. Here's a very complete example.

A simple example:

byte[] clear = GetCleartext();
HashAlgorithm sha2 = SHA256CryptoServiceProvider.Create();
byte[] hashed = sha2.ComputeHash(clear);

To validate a correct password, you would run the same computation over the provided password, and compare the result to the hash you have in your database.

It's good practice to add salt (random data) to the cleartext to avoid rainbow table attacks. Basically, append a known randomly-generated value, unique to that user, to the cleartext before hashing.

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And a clarification: the salt value needs to be kept along with the hash for the later comparisons. And generate a new salt every time the user changes the password. –  devstuff Jun 9 '09 at 3:12
2  
I need the passwords to pass them on to another service. –  Chris Jun 9 '09 at 3:32

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