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Assuming a single machine with 8 cores. In Haskell, you can compile using the threaded option, then during runtime use +RTS -Nx to specify the number of cores to be used. e.g.

$ myprg args // sequential run
$ myprg args +RTS -N1 // parallel run on 1..8 cores
$ myprg args +RTS -N2
$ myprg args +RTS -N4
$ myprg args +RTS -N8

From this, you get the runtimes using increasing number of cores, which you can then use to get speedups and plot a graph.

How would you do this in F#, assuming I have a parallel program e.g. using a parallel map in the code?

EDIT: I found there are ParallelOptions e.g. MaxDegreeOfParallelism which may be what I need but not sure about its exact behaviour, and I would have to use it programmatically which is fine as long as it behaves as expected i.e. MaxDegreeOfParallelism = num of cores program should use, and not parallel 'tasks' or threads.

EDIT: ProcessorAffinity indeed limits the number of cores to use but it seems that it is not properly implemented in Mono. I checked on Windows and it seems to work. Though it is not really a good idea to use. The runtime system should be able to decide better how to manage and schedule tasks. Also, MaxDegreeOfParallelism is about "parallelism level" which basically sets the number of tasks generated, thus could be used to vary granularity.

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If you're using Windows, you can just set the number of CPUs in a task manager: addictivetips.com/windows-tips/… –  Tomas Petricek Mar 13 '12 at 4:18
    
I am using Linux/mono. Is there a way of doing the same thing under Linux? –  vis Mar 13 '12 at 4:21
6  
F# builds a native .NET assembly. An assembly follows the rules specified for runtime (CLR) which by default has affinity on all CPU cores. You can limit CLR for a fewer number of cores by setting System.Diagnostics.Process.GetCurrentProcess().ProcessorAffinity. –  bytebuster Mar 13 '12 at 4:28
    
@bytebuster You should make that an answer so we can upvote it--it's a good answer to the question. –  Onorio Catenacci Mar 13 '12 at 12:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

F# builds a native .NET assembly. An assembly follows the rules specified for runtime (CLR) which by default has affinity on all CPU cores. You can limit CLR for a fewer number of cores by setting System.Diagnostics.Process.GetCurrentProcess().ProcessorAffinity.

This answer seems to be incomplete for Mono environment. ProcessorAffinity value is a bit mask, so 0 is certainly an invalid condition. I'm also wondering why the setter did not throw an exception as described in MSDN.

I would use schedutils to check Mono affinity and also check if MONO_NO_SMP environment flag is not set.

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To quote bytebuster's comment:

F# builds a native .NET assembly. An assembly follows the rules specified for runtime (CLR) which by default has affinity on all CPU cores. You can limit CLR for a fewer number of cores by setting System.Diagnostics.Process.GetCurrentProcess().ProcessorAffinity.

(If you add an answer leave a comment and I will delete this)

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You should probably mark the answer as a community wiki (if you're not the original author). –  Tomas Petricek Mar 13 '12 at 16:56
    
@TomasPetricek: Done –  Guvante Mar 13 '12 at 16:59
    
I tried to use ProcessorAffinity but it does not seem to make any difference when running a parallel program on a machine with 8 cores. I would expect setting the affinity to 1,2,4,8 would have increased speedups but it isn't the case. The runtimes remain the same, as if setting this property doesn't make any difference. Any reason why this might be happening? After looking at the doc in msdn, I am tending to think that it applies to the physical processor and not processor cores. –  vis Mar 14 '12 at 13:35
    
@vis: By default any of the standard parallel libraries will attempt to use all of your cores. ProcessorAffinity and MaxDegreeOfParallelism are usually used in cases where hitting all of the cores is undesired. If you are having identical runtimes after turning on only a single processor using ProcessorAffinity then you may have a bug in your code which is causing it to not be properly parallized. For instance a huge deal is where exactly your parallel calls are. If you are doing a trivial map but a complex operation before it sequentially for instance. –  Guvante Mar 14 '12 at 16:04
    
Printing the ProcessorAffinity before and after changing it, displays 0. I am not sure why this is so. Process.GetCurrentProcess().ProcessorAffinity <- nativeint 2. I running an 8 core machine on 1 processor chip. –  vis Mar 14 '12 at 23:46

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