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My homework involves Big O analysis and I think I've got the hang of it, but I'm not 100% sure. Would any of you lovely people mind taking a look and telling me if I'm on the right track?

The assignment is below. For questions 1 and 3, my analysis and answers are on the right, after the // marks. For question 2, my analysis and answers are below the algorithm type.

Thanks in advance for your help! :-)

1.For each of the following program fragments, give a Big-Oh analysis of the running time in terms of N:
    (a) // Fragment (a)
        for ( int i = 0, Sum = 0; i < N; i++ )      // N operations
            for( int j = 0; j < N; j++ )            // N operations
                Sum++;                              // Total: N^2 operations  =>  O(N^2)

    (b) // Fragment (b)
        for( int i = 0, Sum = 0; i < N * N; i++ )   // N^2 operations
            for( int j = 0; j < N; j ++ )           // N operations
                Sum++;                              // Total: N^3 operations  =>  O(N^3)

    (c) // Fragment (c)
        for( int i = 0, Sum = 0; i < N; i++ )       // N operations
            for( int j = 0; j < i; j ++ )           // N-1 operations
                Sum++;                              // Total: N(N-1) = N^2 – N operations  =>  O(N^2)

    (d) // Fragment (d)
        for( int i = 0, Sum = 0; i < N; i++ )       // N operations
            for( int j = 0; j < N * N; j++ )        // N^2 operations 
                for( int k = 0; k < j; k++ )        // N^2 operations 
                    Sum++;                          // Total: N^5 operations  =>  O(N^5)

2. An algorithm takes 0.5 milliseconds for input size 100. How long will it take for input size 500 if the running time is:
    a. Linear
        0.5 *5 = 2.5 milliseconds

    b. O( N log N)  
        O (N log N) – treat the first N as a constant, so O (N log N) = O (log N)
        Input size 100 = (log 100) + 1 = 2 + 1 = 3 operations
        Input size 500 = (log 500) + 1= 2.7 + 1 = 3.7 ≈ 4 operations
        Input size 100 runs in 0.5 milliseconds, so input size 500 takes 0.5 * (4/3) ≈ 0.67 milliseconds

    c. Quadratic        
        Input size 100 in quadratic runs 100^2 operations =   10,000 operations
        Input size 500 in quadratic runs 500^2 operations = 250,000 operations = 25 times as many
        Input size of 100 runs in 0.5 milliseconds, so input size of 500 takes 25 * 0.5 = 12.5 milliseconds

    d. Cubic
        Input size 100 in quadratic runs 100^3 operations =     1,000,000 operations
        Input size 500 in quadratic runs 500^3 operations = 125,000,000 operations = 125 times as many
        Input size of 100 runs in 0.5 milliseconds, so input size of 500 takes 125 * 0.5 = 62.5 milliseconds


3. Find the Big-O for the following:
    (a) f(x) = 2x^3 + x^2 log x             // O(x^3)
    (b) f(x) = (x^4 – 34x^3 + x^2 -20)      // O(x^4)
    (c) f(x) = x^3 – 1/log(x)               // O(x^3)

4. Order the following functions by growth rate: (1 is slowest growth rate; 11 is fastest growth rate)
__6_ (a) N
__5_ (b) √N
__7_ (c) N^1.5
__9_ (d) N^2
__4_ (e) N log N
__2_ (f) 2/N        
_11_ (g) 2^N
__3_ (h) 37
_10_ (i) N^3
__1_ (j) 1/ N^2
__8_ (k) N^2 /log N


* My logic in putting (j) and (f) as the slowest is that as N grows, 1/N^2 and 2/N decrease, so their growth rates are negative and therefore slower than the rest which have positive growth rates (or a 0 growth rate in the case of 37 (h)). Is that correct?
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Although closely related to programming this is a better question for cs.stackexchange.com. If you have questions like this in the future please direct them there. –  Ron Warholic Mar 21 '12 at 20:01

4 Answers 4

I looked at your questions 1 to 3 and its looks alright.

Follow these rules and check for yourself:

1) Multiplicative constants can be omitted, Example 50n^2 simplifies to n^2

2) n^a dominates n^b if a>b Example n^3 dominates n^2, so n^3 + n^2 + n ,simplifies to n3

3) Any exponential dominates any polynomial Example 3^n dominates n^5 Example 2^n dominates n^2+5n+100

4) Any polynomial dominates any logarithm Example n dominates (log n)3

As for Question 4 use below as a guide (from least to greatest):

Log2 n < n < n log2 n < n^2 < n^3 < 2^n

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Just noticed the exponents didn't format right - I meant to change them to ^ notation but I forgot. Should I repost this with the correct formatting? –  Erica Mar 13 '12 at 5:56
    
Ok, I just edited it to show the exponential notation. Does everything still look okay? Thanks for your help! :-) –  Erica Mar 13 '12 at 6:14
    
Oh, and thanks very much for your help! –  Erica Mar 13 '12 at 8:17

the answer for the (b) of the time calculation is wrong. you can not assume one of the n as constant.So nlogn becomes 1log1 which means log1 is 0. so 0.

so that answer is 100 log100 operations comparision with 500log500 ...

coming to the least to greatest. b is 4 and a is 5. c,e,k are competition for the position 6 and 7 and 8. 1,2,3 positions given by you are correct.9,10,11 are correct.

i will check some analysis over 6,7,8 and let you know..

if you need any clarrification over my answer you can comment on that ..

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Thanks for your help! –  Erica Mar 13 '12 at 8:25
    
how to find the answer in best way for the 4 th question. lt n->infinity f(n)/g(n)=infinity then f(n)>g(n).=constant then f(n)=g(n) =0 then f(n)<g(n). you should deal mathematics for this.derivatives limits which are very very easy.. –  user533 Mar 14 '12 at 4:35

@op Can you please tell me why you considered O(nlgn) = O(lg n)? As far as I understand your analysis for Q2 part b is actually the analysis of O(lg n) algorithms, to analyze nlgn algos you need to factor in that n in the left.

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I had been thinking that the N on the left would be considered a constant. Looks like I was mistaken. This is a great learning experience! :-) –  Erica Mar 13 '12 at 8:18
  1. (a) Correct
    (b) Correct
    (c) Correctish. 0 + 1 + 2 + ... + (n - 1) = n(n - 1) / 2 = 0.5n^2 - 0.5n = O(n^2)
    (d) Correct (there is a 1/2 in there like for (c), but the complexity is still O(N^5))

  2. a. Correct
    b. let K be the duration of one step.
    K * (100 log 100) = 0.5, so K = 7.5 * 10^-4
    K * (500 log 500) = 7.5 * 1-^-4 * 500 log 500 = 3.3737ms

    Alternatively, (500 log 500) / (100 log 100) = 6.7474
    When n = 500 it will be 6.7474 times slower, 6.7474 * 0.5ms = 3.3737ms

    c. Correct
    d. Correct

  3. (a) Correct
    (b) Correct
    (c) Correct

  4. __5_ (a) N
    __4_ (b) √N
    __7_ (c) N^1.5
    __9_ (d) N^2
    __6_ (e) N log N
    __2_ (f) 2/N
    _11_ (g) 2^N
    __3_ (h) 37
    _10_ (i) N^3
    __1_ (j) 1 / N^2
    __8_ (k) N^2 /log N

I agree with the positioning of (f) and (j). However, you should be aware that they don't occur out there 'in the wild' because every algorithm has at least one step, and therefore cannot beat O(1). See Are there any O(1/n) algorithms? for a more detailed explanation.

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Thank you. That's exactly what I need! –  Erica Mar 13 '12 at 8:19

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