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I want to write a simple application using opengl under linux. I want to open the image and allow the user to interactively select a rectangle. After that user can save it to a specific location.

Could anyone give me the startup links or sample code.

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You could do this with DevIL (for one example), but I can't imagine why you would -- OpenGL doesn't seem to contribute much to this task. – Jerry Coffin Mar 13 '12 at 7:08
    
@JerryCoffin, thanks a lot... there are many other things which should be done... at the moment I am just considering to construct a simple gui with this interface.... there is a lot of functionality which I ll embed later... At the end I want to render the selected image portion onto an object in 3d... this interface is to select that area... Hope it clears – Shan Mar 13 '12 at 7:15
    
Okay, in that case, follow the link to DevIL and go from there... – Jerry Coffin Mar 13 '12 at 7:17
up vote 1 down vote accepted

From your question I take it that you think OpenGL was some kind of imaging library. This is not the case.

OpenGL is meant only for drawing nice pictures to the screen. It deals neither with image loading, or storing. It's also not meant for imaging operations like cropping (although this is actually quite easy to implement with OpenGL).

Regarding your question: OpenGL can be used for the "display the image" and "draw a rectangle around it" part. Loading and saving the image, and doing the actual crop is not to be done using OpenGL.

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thanks a lot for your explanation. It is just that I have to texture a 3D object interactively. I am rendering in OpenGl so i thought that it might of some functionality to facilitate this. But it seem that it does not. – Shan Mar 15 '12 at 17:03

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