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If I'm using terminal and typing in a line of text for a command, is there a hotkey or any way to clear/delete that line?

For example, if my current line/command is something really long like:

> git log --graph --all --blah..uh oh i want to cancel and clear this line <cursor is here now>

Is there a hotkey or command to go from the above to:

>

?

Usually I will press the key, and if my current line is a brand new one on the history, that will clear it. But if I'm going through my command history via the key and start editing or using those commands, will only change the prompt to the next newest command in history, so it doesn't work here unless I press multiple times.

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1  
Shortcuts to Move Faster in Bash Command Line This page is more illustrative and explains better I think – Gab Aug 18 '15 at 8:22

12 Answers 12

up vote 566 down vote accepted

You can use Ctrl+U to clear up to the beginning.

You can also use Ctrl+C to cancel.

If you want to keep the history, you can use Alt+Shift+# to make it a comment.


Bash Emacs Editing Mode Cheat Sheet

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91  
The line deleted by Ctrl-U is recallable with Ctrl-Y, too. – keks Dec 4 '12 at 10:59
27  
Wut? So cool thanks keks & kev, ⌃+U is delete all before Cursor, ⌃+K is delete all after Cursor, ⌃+A is to go to the beginning of the line. So technically ⌃+C is the best solution for the Question – iGodric Apr 27 '13 at 20:42
21  
Upvoted for teaching me <kbd>...</kbd> tag to show keys in SO. – Samveen Jun 14 '13 at 17:19
6  
Why isn't a simple ESC like windows' command prompt? – Lưu Vĩnh Phúc Aug 21 '14 at 8:26
4  
@LưuVĩnhPhúc ESC is it's own modifier key in bash. It's used for things like cancelling history navigation (CTRL+r), or swapping the last two words behind the cursor (ESC+t). – noobish Oct 15 '14 at 17:46

Just to summarise all the answers

  • Clean up the line: You can use Ctrl+U to clear up to the beginning.
  • Clean up the line: Ctrl+A Ctrl+K to wipe the current line in the terminal
  • Cancel the current command/line: Ctrl+C.
  • Recall the deleted command: Ctrl+Y (then Alt+Y)
  • Go at the beginning of the line: Ctrl+A
  • Go at the end of the line: Ctrl+E
  • Remove the forward words for example, if you are middle of the command: Ctrl+K
  • Remove characters on the left, until the beginning of the word: Ctrl+W
  • To clear your entire command prompt: Ctrl + L
  • Toggle between the start of line and current cursor position: Ctrl + XX
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1  
note ctrl-k deletes everything between the cursor and the end of the line. – Accipheran Jan 9 '15 at 16:33
    
this is absolutely awesome <3 – sad tuna Jul 31 '15 at 7:31
    
I pasted this in my "notes" for quick reference. – Morkrom Feb 24 at 0:18

Ctrl+A, Ctrl+K to wipe the current line in the terminal. You can then recall it with Ctrl+Y if you need.

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or if your using vi mode, hit Esc followed by cc

to get back what you just erased, Esc and then p :)

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You can enable vi mode by echo 'set editing-mode vi' >> ~/.inputrc. Also works in places like python interpreter prompts and some SQL clients – dwurf Oct 13 '14 at 0:12

I'm not sure if you love it but I use Ctrl+A (to go beginning the line) and Ctrl+K (to delete the line) I was familiar with these commands from emacs, and figured out them accidently.

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An alternative to Ctrl+A, Ctrl+K is Ctrl+E, Ctrl+U.

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  • Ctrl+u: move up to the beginning of your line to a ring buffer
  • Ctrl+k: move up to the end of your line to a ring buffer
  • Ctrl+w: move characters and (multiple) words left from your cursor to a ring buffer

  • Ctrl+y: insert last entry from your ring buffer and then you can use Alt+y to rotate through your ring buffer. Press multiple times to continue to "previous" entry in ring buffer.

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I have the complete shortcuts list:

  1. Ctrl-a Move cursor to start of line
  2. Ctrl-e Move cursor to end of line
  3. Ctrl-b Move back one character
  4. Alt-b Move back one word
  5. Ctrl-f Move forward one character
  6. Alt-f Move forward one word
  7. Ctrl-d Delete current character
  8. Ctrl-w Cut the last word
  9. Ctrl-k Cut everything after the cursor
  10. Alt-d Cut word after the cursor
  11. Alt-<- cut word before the cursor
  12. Ctrl-y Paste the last deleted command
  13. Ctrl-_ Undo
  14. Ctrl-u Cut everything before the cursor
  15. Ctrl-xx Toggle between first and current position
  16. Ctrl-l Clear the terminal
  17. Ctrl-c Cancel the command
  18. Ctrl-r Search command in history - type the search term
  19. Ctrl-j End the search at current history entry
  20. Ctrl-g Cancel the search and restore original line
  21. Ctrl-n Next command from the History
  22. Ctrl-p previous command from the History
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1  
A laundry list of default keybindings is not hard to google, and only incidentally answers this specific question. Posting it as an answer here is dubious IMHO. – tripleee Mar 19 at 6:45
    
Sorry, But I have provided all the useful shortcut keys, In which 7,8,9,10,11,14,16,17 are the clear/delete short cut keys which we can use as per requirement. – tharunkumar Mar 24 at 4:44

CTRL+R and start typing to search for previous commands in history. Will show full lines.
CTRL+R again to cycle.

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Ctrl + W will clear the word to the left.

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Just to summarise all the answers

  • Clean up the line: You can use Ctrl+U to clear up to the beginning.
  • Clean up the line: Ctrl+A Ctrl+K to wipe the current line in the terminal
  • Cancel the current command/line: Ctrl+C.
  • Recall the deleted command: Ctrl+Y
  • Go at the beginning of the line: Ctrl+A
  • Remove the forward words for example, if you are middle of the command: Ctrl+K
  • Remove characters on the left, until the beginning of the word: Ctrl+W

Here I'll add 1 more important Command:

  • To clear your entire command prompt: Ctrl + L
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To delete the whole line no matter where the cursor is, you can use the kill-whole-line command, but it is unbound by default. It can be bound to, for example, Ctrl+K+K (technically Ctrl+K Ctrl+K) by inserting

"\C-k\C-k": kill-whole-line

into your Readline init file (conventionally ~/.inputrc).

Various remarks:

  • To avoid accidentally re-assigning a key sequence that is already in use for something else, you can check all your bindings with bind -P. Check for the suggested binding with

    bind -P | grep '\\C-k\\C-k'
    
  • The Readline init file name is is taken from the shell variable INPUTRC. If it is unset, the default is ~/.inputrc, or (if that doesn't exist) /etc/inputrc. Notice that if you have ~/.inputrc, /etc/inputrc will be ignored.
  • To reload your Readline init file, you can use Ctrl+X Ctrl+R.
  • Links to relevant manual sections:
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