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I'm not sure my question is understandable. I don't know of a better way to explain it without an example.

Let's assume I have the following code:

function foo(obj){
    var index = 0;
    obj.onstart = function(){
        ++index;
        console.log('start', index);
    }
    obj.onfinish = function(){
        console.log('finish', index);
    }
}

Now let's assume I have the following test case:

foo(slow_connection);
foo(fast_connection);

Basically, the onfinish of slow_connection is triggered after the onstart of fast_connection causing the following output.

start 1
start 2
finish 2      <-- This should be 1!
finish 2

PS: I can't change the arguments of foo() the only code I can change is inside foo().

share|improve this question
    
ummm, Can't really answer good one, without your real code, but why won't you use a separate index variable for each connection or use setTimeout? –  gdoron Mar 13 '12 at 8:44
    
The index variable is my problem. How do I "count" up while using this number locally inside onstart and onfinish? The setTimeout idea is completely unusable in my case. –  Christian Mar 13 '12 at 8:46
    
Also, you won't be able to answer with my real code since it spans several hundred lines of code. –  Christian Mar 13 '12 at 8:47
    
If you can't sync between the two, and must use one variable, I'm afraid it can't be done. –  gdoron Mar 13 '12 at 8:49
    
@Joseph I'm not sure I understand your question. start/finish are just events I threw in as an example. They could be a mouseover/out or ajax start/finish. The point is that I need to have a local variable as their index and a global one as the counter. –  Christian Mar 13 '12 at 8:50

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Something like this maybe:

function foo(obj){
  var index = 0;

  obj.onstart = function(){
    ++index;
    console.log('start', index);
  };

  // bind onfinish using a "copy" of the current index.
  obj.onfinish = (function (idx) {
    return function () {
      console.log('finish', idx);
    };
  }(index));
}
share|improve this answer
    
Ah, that's it! I knew it had to be about closures. Thanks! –  Christian Mar 13 '12 at 9:29

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