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I want to reuse a std::vector within a for loop. However, I need the vector to be empty for each iteration step of the for loop.

Question: How can I empty a vector rapidly without changing its capacity in the most efficient way?

What I used so far is

std::vector<int> myVec;
for(int i=0; i<A_BIG_NUMBER; ++i) {
    std::vector<T>().swap(myVec);
    myVec.reserve(STANDARD_MAXIMUM);

    /// .. doing business
}

Cheers!

Solution:

Thanks for the answers, here is how I implemented (checked) it:

#include <vector>
#include <iostream>

 int main() {

    int n = 10;
    std::vector< int > myVec;
    myVec.reserve(n);
    for(int j=0; j<3; ++j) {
            myVec.clear();
            for(int i=0; i<n; ++i) {
                    myVec.push_back(i);
            }
            for(int i=0; i<myVec.size(); ++i) {
                    std::cout << i << ": " << myVec[i] << std::endl;
            }
    }

    return 0;
}

EDIT: changed from operator[] to push_back.

share|improve this question
    
Not only is the chosen solution wrong, the question doesn't even make sense. If you want the vector's size to remain constant, you don't clear it. You either just write over the top of existing elements, or reset each element individually. –  user420442 Mar 13 '12 at 11:16
    
@BoPersson: Yep, tricked myself. Wanted to get too much.. I'll take that snipped out of my question. –  ezdazuzena Mar 13 '12 at 13:07
    
Were you looking for remove from the algorithm library? –  Mr Lister Mar 13 '12 at 13:17
    
@MrLister: Nope, thanks any way. –  ezdazuzena Mar 13 '12 at 13:26

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Use vector::clear method. It will clear the content without reducing its capacity.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, it's doing the job! +1 –  ezdazuzena Mar 13 '12 at 10:22
1  
But it will reduce the size, making myVec[i]=i; above illegal. –  Bo Persson Mar 13 '12 at 10:47
    
Yes, I agree..@ezdazuzena: You should use push_back as suggested.. –  Asha Mar 13 '12 at 10:56
    
@Asha: you are right. Thanks for pointing that out –  ezdazuzena Mar 13 '12 at 13:08
myVec.clear();

This is equivalent to myVec.erase(myVec.begin(), myVec.end()).

share|improve this answer

use clear method as below:

std::vector<int> myVec;
    for(int i=0; i<A_BIG_NUMBER; ++i) 
    {
        std::vector<T>().swap(myVec);
        myVec.reserve(STANDARD_MAXIMUM);

        /// .. doing business
    myVec.clear();
    }
share|improve this answer
2  
Well, in this case he probably doesn't need his swap/reverse thing, does he? –  Christian Rau Mar 13 '12 at 10:02
    
apologize my mistake... –  shobi Mar 13 '12 at 10:10

Answer based on OP's solution:
The normal approach for containers is to start with an empty container and fill it up as needed with an exception for std::vector where you can reserve space eventhough there are still no objects in the container.
If you want a different approach where an "empty container" would be a container of default objects that you can access like an array (only works with std::vector and std::deque), then you need to start with resize() and you can "clean up" with fill:

int n = 10;
std::vector<int> myVec;
myVec.resize(n);
myVec[4] = 5;
std::cout << myVec[4] << "\n";
std::fill(myVec.begin(), myVec.end(), int()); // ofcourse for int, you can use 0 instead of int()
std::cout << myVec[4] << "\n";
share|improve this answer

To retain the current size of a vector with default values for its content, you can assign default values to the vector. In the case of a vector of ints, you can do the following:

myVec.assign( myVec.size(), 0 );
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