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suppose I have a class like

class ABC
{
    int ID;
    public string Name;
    public ABC(int i, string str) { ID = i; Name = str; }
}

And declare a array of class ABC. Assume that I have also initialized each element using new keyword. Now I want access element of class using it's member ID instead of 0 based index. Make ID public if required.

public partial class _Default : System.Web.UI.Page 
{
    protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        ABC[] a = new ABC[3];
        a[0] = new ABC(100, "First");
        a[1] = new ABC(101, "Second");
        a[2] = new ABC(102, "Third");

        ABC newobj = a[100]; // where 100 is ID of class ABC
    }
}

class ABC
{
    int ID;
    string Name;
    public ABC(int i, string str)
    {
         ID = i;
         Name = str;
    }
}
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5  
So why don't you put them into a Dictionary<int, ABC> instead? –  Jon Mar 13 '12 at 9:59
    
can u please give me a sample code.? I dont know how to work with dictionaries in .NET –  user971431 Mar 13 '12 at 10:03
    
I cannot, but Google and MSDN can. –  Jon Mar 13 '12 at 10:07
    
please vote up my question. I need some points to vote up answers. –  user971431 Mar 13 '12 at 11:19

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Overloading the indexer on a standard array isn't possible in C#. If you have to go the indexer route I'd suggest using Dictionary or a List class that supplies it's own indexer.

class ABCCollection : List<ABC>
{
  public ABC this[int id]
  {
    get { return this.Where(abc => abc.ID == id).FirstOrDefault(); }
  }
}

Then you call use ABCCollection[100] to access your item.

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I like this approach.. anyone please tell me is there any drawback of this approach over Dictionary..?? any performance issue..?? –  user971431 Mar 13 '12 at 10:59
    
please vote up my question. I need some points to vote up answers. –  user971431 Mar 13 '12 at 11:20
    
can't I override Add() function in my way..?? –  user971431 Mar 13 '12 at 11:31
    
Don't inherit from List<ABC> in that case but rather from CollectionBase and implement your own Add method. –  Mark Green Mar 23 '12 at 11:37

You can use LINQ to get the right object:

ABC newobj = a.Where(abc => abc.ID == 100).FirstOrDefault();

Which returns null if there's no matching ID.

As @Xanatos has suggested, you could also use this neater version:

ABC newobj = a.FirstOrDefault(abc => abc.ID == 100);

As @Jon has suggested, it might be better to use a Dictionary<int, ABC> to store your ABC instances. It provides better performance than always iterating a Collection to find a matching ID. But then the key must be unique, you cannot add two ABC instances with the same ID:

var a = new Dictionary<int, ABC>();
a.Add(100, new ABC(100, "First"));
a.Add(101, new ABC(101, "Second"));
a.Add(102, new ABC(102, "Third"));

You would access it in this way:

ABC newobj = a[100];
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This could work too: ABC newObj = a.Single(abc => abc.ID == 100); However, none of our methods would work now because the fields are private... :D –  Abbas Mar 13 '12 at 10:04
    
works fine.. thanks for prompt response.. but I want to do this in the same way like we can access cookies with cookie name as Request.Cookies["CookieName"].Value. Is this possible any how..?? –  user971431 Mar 13 '12 at 10:07
    
Or more compactly ABC newobj = a.FirstOrDefault(abc => abc.ID == 100); –  xanatos Mar 13 '12 at 10:07
1  
@ShashwatIndia: I've just added the Dictionary approach. –  Tim Schmelter Mar 13 '12 at 10:09
    
A Lookup<TKey, TElement> (non-unique keys) or a Dictionary<TKey, TValue> (unique keys, as others already wrote) would give you access via an indexer (abc[100]). You could also implement your own data structure with an indexer (see msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/6x16t2tx.aspx), but I think one of the existing classes works perfect. –  Matthias Meid Mar 13 '12 at 10:14

Here is the code for working with a Dictionary (MSDN):

//instantiate it: key is of type int, value is of type string
var dict = new Dictionary<int, string>();
//add a few items...
dict.Add(100, "First");
dict.Add(101, "Second");

//get item with key '100'
var first = dict[100];

Hope this helps!

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please vote up my question. I need some points to vote up answers. –  user971431 Mar 13 '12 at 11:20

You can simply use LINQ query to solve problem:

 var newobj = (from data in a
               where data.ID ==100
               select data).Cast<ABC>();
share|improve this answer
    
please vote up my question. I need some points to vote up answers. –  user971431 Mar 13 '12 at 11:20

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