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I use markup to display a dropdown menu using Twitter Bootstrap.

<ul class="nav pull-right">
    <li class="dropdown">
        <a href="#" class="dropdown-toggle" data-toggle="dropdown">Menu <b class="caret"></b></a>
        <ul class="dropdown-menu">
            <li><a href="#">Menu item 1...</a></li>
            <li class="divider"></li>
            <li><a href="#">Menu item 2...</a></li>
            <li><a href="#">Menu item 3</a></li>
        </ul>
    </li>
</ul>

I want to be able to make menu items appear disabled, i.e. no hover effect and probably a different text decoration to make the disabled state visible to the user.

What is the best way to accomplish this? Is there an exisisting bootstrap css class I can add to the <li> or <a> element?

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1  
You want the link to "appear" disabled but not actually disabled? –  Andres Ilich Mar 13 '12 at 12:54
    
Sorry if the question was unclear. I want one or more menu items to be disabled (in every way, not only appearance). –  codeape Mar 13 '12 at 13:19
    
And how are you expecting the events to take place, e.g. you want the buttons to become enabled if a certain action is taken? Or you're just looking for a way to easily disable the links with some jQuery? You can't fully disable a link with plain css. –  Andres Ilich Mar 13 '12 at 13:33
    
It doesn't matter if it is done using jQuery or css. –  codeape Mar 13 '12 at 13:54

6 Answers 6

up vote 16 down vote accepted

You can attach a custom disabled class to your menu link a tag that you want to disable and simply remove the default action by using preventDefault and targetting that class, like so:

$(".disabled-link").click(function(event) {
  event.preventDefault();
});

Then you can style all events from the .disabled-link with a grey backdrop or any style you like;

CSS

a.disabled-link,
a.disabled-link:visited ,
a.disabled-link:active,
a.disabled-link:hover {
    background-color:#d9d9d9 !important;
    color:#aaa !important;
}

Demo

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1  
Thanks, that's just what I needed. I did some googling and found out about the pointer-events css attribute. This updated version of your jsfiddle uses pointer-events instead of using script to disable the action: jsfiddle.net/fABRr/2 –  codeape Mar 13 '12 at 20:02
    
Sadly that is only supported by FF4+ and Chrome (last time i checked) :( , thought about using the same as well but did not think it was a proper answer with such lack of support. –  Andres Ilich Mar 13 '12 at 20:04
    
Support Chart, no IE support (no surprise there), FF is supported ver 3.6+, no Opera support, Chrome ver 16+ support. Not bad, but not so good either :( –  Andres Ilich Mar 13 '12 at 20:06
    
Ouch. I guess I'll check for the disabled-link class in the click handlers for the menu items then. –  codeape Mar 13 '12 at 20:14

When outputing the code for a disabled drop down, why not simply use :

<li class='disabled'>
  <a href="#">Menu</a>
</li>

You can always add the caret back if you still want it to appear.

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3  
+1 The documentation shows you this twitter.github.com/bootstrap/components.html#navs (under "Disabled state") –  ta.speot.is Jan 30 '13 at 22:51
1  
Also from the documentation, if you don't want links to be clickable then get rid of the href. Although retain the a for formatting. –  ta.speot.is Jan 30 '13 at 23:45

I prefer this (LESS):

/* Disable link */
a.disabled, 
a.disabled:visited ,
a.disabled:active,
a.disabled:hover {  
  color: #999 ;
  cursor: default;
}
.dropdown-menu {
  a.disabled, 
  a.disabled:visited ,
  a.disabled:active,
  a.disabled:hover {  
    color: #999 ;
    cursor: default;
    background-color: white;
  }
}
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Just to add to Andres answer (don't have enough reputation to add comments :( ). You need to return false from the event handler or it might continue executing other handlers.

$(".disabled-link").click(function(event) {
  event.preventDefault();
  return false;
});
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2  
I believe event.preventDefault() takes care of that. –  codeape Aug 9 '12 at 20:52
1  
@codeape I believe that return false is needed for IE though. –  Nathan Oct 3 '12 at 23:05
1  
@codeape In Chrome, return false is mandatory as well, so I would say it can be considered a good practice. –  yagooar Jan 3 '13 at 21:02
    
See also this answer: stackoverflow.com/a/1357151/3571 –  codeape Jan 4 '13 at 8:54
    
In a jQuery event handler, return false does two things: event.stopPropagation() and event.preventDefault(). (When not using jQuery, return false in event handlers means other things depending on where you use it...) So if you add return false, you can remove event.preventDefault(), because that will be done anyway. –  T.J. Crowder Jun 10 '13 at 15:04

To disable the the dropdown use:

$('.dropdown-toggle').addClass('disabled');

To enable it back:

$('.dropdown-toggle').removeClass('disabled');
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+1 This is the correct way to achieve this... –  Sten Muchow Feb 24 at 9:10

Similar to above you can use:

    li.disabled > a {
    color:#aaa !important;
    }

This way you are keeping the same bootstrap default class for disabled links and implement the preventDefault() Javascript to disabled the link.

$(".disabled").click(function(event) {
event.preventDefault();
return false;
});
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