Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm currently working on a project and I would like to test it out on two laptops at home where one laptop connects to the localhost on the other. I am using XAMPP. How do I do this?

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 91 down vote accepted

That's definitely possible. We'll take a general case with Apache here.

Let's say you're a big Symfony2 fan and you would like to access your symfony website at http://symfony.local/ from 4 different computers (the main one hosting your website, as well as a Mac, a Windows and a Linux distro connected (wireless or not) to the main computer.

General Sketch:

enter image description here


1 Set up a virtual host:

You first need to set up a virtual host in your apache httpd-vhosts.conf file. On XAMP, you can find this file here: C:\xampp\apache\conf\extra\httpd-vhosts.conf. On MAMP, you can find this file here: Applications/MAMP/conf/apache/extra/httpd-vhosts.conf. This step prepares the Web server on your computer for handling symfony.local requests. You need to provide the name of the Virtual Host as well as the root/main folder of your website. To do this, add the following line at the end of that file. You need to change the DocumentRoot to wherever your main folder is. Here I have taken /Applications/MAMP/htdocs/Symfony/ as the root of my website.

<VirtualHost *:80>
    DocumentRoot "/Applications/MAMP/htdocs/Symfony/"
    ServerName symfony.local
</VirtualHost>

2 Configure your hosts file:

For the client (your browser in that case) to understand what symfony.local really means, you need to edit the hosts file on your computer. Everytime you type an URL in your browser, your computer tries to understand what it means! symfony.local doesn't mean anything for a computer. So it will try to resolve the name symfony.local to an IP address. It will do this by first looking into the hosts file on your computer to see if he can match an IP address to what you typed in the address bar. If it can't, then it will ask DNS servers. The trick here is to append the following to your hosts file. On MAC, this file is in /private/etc/hosts; on LINUX, this file is in /etc/hosts; and on WINDOWS, this file is in \Windows\system32\private\etc\hosts (if you're using WINDOWS 7, this file is in \Windows\system32\drivers\etc\hosts).

##
# Host Database
# localhost is used to configure the loopback interface
##
#...
127.0.0.1           symfony.local

From now on, everytime you type symfony.local on this computer, your computer will use the loopback interface to connect to symfony.local. It will understand that you want to work on localhost (127.0.0.1).

3 Access symfony.local from an other computer:

We finally arrive to your main question which is:

How can I now access my website through an other computer?

Well this is now easy! We just need to tell the other computers how they could find symfony.local! How do we do this?

3a Get the IP address of the computer hosting the website:

We first need to know the IP address on the computer that hosts the website (the one we've been working on since the very beginning). In the terminal, on MAC and LINUX type ifconfig |grep inet, on WINDOWS type ipconfig. Let's assume the IP address of this computer is 192.168.1.5.

3b Edit the hosts file on the computer you are trying to access the website from.:

Again, on MAC, this file is in /private/etc/hosts; on LINUX, in /etc/hosts; and on WINDOWS, in \Windows\system32\private\etc\hosts (if you're using WINDOWS 7, this file is in \Windows\system32\drivers\etc\hosts).. The trick is now to use the IP address of the computer we are trying to access/talk to:

##
# Host Database
# localhost is used to configure the loopback interface
##
#...
192.168.1.5         symfony.local

4 Finally enjoy the results in your browser

You can now go into your browser and type http://symfony.local to beautifully see your website on different computers! Note that you can apply the same strategy if you are a OSX user to test your website on Internet Explorer via Virtual Box (if you don't want to use a Windows computer). This is beautifully explained in Crafting Your Windows / IE Test Environment on OSX.


You can also access your localhost from mobile devices

You might wonder how to access your localhost website from a mobile device. In some cases, you won't be able to modify the hosts file (iPhone, iPad...) on your device (jailbreaking excluded).

Well, the solution then is to install a proxy server on the machine hosting the website and connect to that proxy from your iphone. It's actually very well explained in the following posts and is not that long to set up:

On a Mac, I would recommend: Testing a Mac OS X web site using a local hostname on a mobile device: Using SquidMan as a proxy. It's a 100% free solution. Some people can also use Charles as a proxy server but it's 50$.

On Linux, you can adapt the Mac OS way above by using Squid as a proxy server.

On Windows, you can do that using Fiddler. The solution is described in the following post: Monitoring iPhone traffic with Fiddler

share|improve this answer
    
Nice reply. I followed the last part until I got to "Monitoring iPhone traffic with Fiddler". It points to Fiddler homepage. This should be the link: conceptdev.blogspot.com/2009/01/… –  helpse Sep 14 '13 at 23:53
    
Thanks very much @helpse! I've updated the answer with your link. Cheers!!! –  Patt Sep 15 '13 at 6:21

it may be that your firewalls are preventing you from accessing the localhost's webserver.
Put the IP addresses of both of your computers' internet security antivirus network security as safe IP addresses if required.
How to find the IP address of your windows PC: Start > (Run) type in: cmd (Enter)
(This opens the black box command prompt)
type in ipconfig (Enter)
Let's say your Apache or IIS webserver is installed on your PC: 192.168.0.3
and you want to access your webserver with your laptop. (laptop's IP is 192.168.0.5)
On your PC you type in: http://localhost/ inside your Firefox or Internet Eplorer browser to access your data on your webserver.
On your laptop you type in http://192.168.0.3/ to access your webserver on your PC.

For all these things to work you need have installed a webserver correctly (e.g. IIS, Apache, XAMP, WAMP etc).

If it does not work, try to ping your PC from your laptop:
Open up command propmt on your laptop: Start > cmd (Enter)
ping 192.168.1.3 (Enter)
If the pinging fails, then firewalls are blocking your connection or your network cabling is faulty. Restart your modem or network switch and your machines.
Close programs such as chat programs that are using your ports.
You can also try a diffrent port number: http:192.168.0.3:80 or http:192.168.0.3:81 or any random number at the end

share|improve this answer
1  
Thank tou @KarlosFontana - you just answered my question too. I was having trouble connecting my iPhone to a server that I wrote on the desktop. The iPhone was connected to my PC's WiFi. Your last line answered my question :-) –  Tommy Feb 6 '13 at 17:54

You cannot connect to localhost on another machine. localhost always refers to the local host machine. Crazy naming scheme, right?

If you want to connect to another machine on a network, you need to replace localhost with the network name (or IP address) of the machine in question.

share|improve this answer
    
Can you push me in the right direction as to where to start? Really don't have a clue where to begin –  user1219572 Mar 13 '12 at 10:35
    
You're working on this project, right? I'm assuming to test it, you use a browser (or a custom app) and connect to localhost/a/path/to/a/file. Well replace localhost with the name of the machine: someothermachine/a/path/to/a/file or use the IP address: 192.168.0.whatever/a/path/to/a/file. Or perhaps I'm misunderstanding the problem. –  adelphus Mar 13 '12 at 10:40

Provided both machines are in the same workgroup, open cmd.exe on the machine you want to connect to, type ipconfig and note the IP at the IPv4 Address line.

Then, on the machine you want to connect with, use http:// + the IP of the target machine.

That should do it.

share|improve this answer

This is a side note if one still can't access localhost from another devices after following through the step above. This might be due to the apache ports.conf has been configured to serve locally (127.0.0.1) and not to outside.

check the following, (for ubuntu apache2)

  $ cat /etc/apache2/ports.conf

if the following is set,

NameVirtualHost *:80  
Listen 127.0.0.1:80  

then change it back to default value

NameVirtualHost *:80  
Listen 80  
share|improve this answer

protected by Shai Jul 6 at 15:42

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality answers, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site.

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.