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What is the purpose of having more than one class in a java file.I am new to java.

Edited: That can again be achieved by creating a inner class inside public class right?

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11 Answers 11

up vote 52 down vote accepted

Yes, it can. However, there can only be one public class per .java file, as public classes must have the same name as the source file.

The purpose of including multiple classes in one source file is to bundle related support functionality (internal data structures, support classes, etc) together with the main public class. Note that it is always ok not to do this -- the only effect is on the readability (or not) of your code.

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I think it's a good idea to do so if you want to keep that extra classes private, so they can be completely changed later without breaking anything outside that accidentally uses those classes. –  ammoQ Jun 9 '09 at 5:49
1  
It's in there for 1.0 compatibility (before nested classes). It is a big mistake in the language. The biggest advantage for using it is that IDEs have hopeless file handling. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Jun 9 '09 at 8:24
13  
One public, top-level class per file. There can be as many public inner classes per file as you like. –  erickson Jun 9 '09 at 12:43
    
@Tom, which part do you think is a mistake, inner classes or multiple top-level classes per file? –  finnw Jan 31 '11 at 13:09
    
@finnw Multiple top-level classes per file. It's just so wrong. Where is java.awt.LightweightDispatcher? –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Jan 31 '11 at 15:32

A public class must be implemented in a file with the same name as the class. A single file can contain one public and optionally some private classes. This is useful if the classes are only used internally by the public class. Additionally the public class can also contain inner classes.

Although it is fine to have one or more private classes in a single source file, I would say that is more readable to use inner and anonymous classes instead. For example one can use an anonymous class to define a Comparator class inside a public class:

  public static Comparator MyComparator = new Comparator() {
    public int compare(Object obj, Object anotherObj) {

    }
  };

The Comparator class will normally require a separate file in order to be public. This way it is bundled with the class that uses it.

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It's not really a private class if it's in the file with no-modifier . You can't have a private class without it being an inner class because if you did, who could use it? –  Bjorn Tipling Dec 27 '11 at 6:30

Besides anonymous inner classes, another use is private inner classes that implement a public interface (see this article). The outer class can access all private fields and methods of the inner class.

This lets you create two tightly-coupled classes, such as a model and its view, without exposing the implementations of either. Another example is a collection and its iterators.

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Yes, as much as you want!

BUT only one "public" class in every file!

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In general, there should be one class per file. If you organise things that way, then when you search for a class, you know you only need to search for the file with that name.

The exception is when a class is best implemented using one or more small helper classes. Usually, the code is easiest to follow when those classes are present in the same file. For instance, you might need a small 'tuple' wrapper class to pass some data between method calls. Another example are 'task' classes implementing Runnable or Callable. They may be so small that they are best combined with the parent class creating and calling them.

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Yes it can,but there can only be 1 public class inside any package as java compiler creates the .Class file which is of the same name as the Public class name therefore if their are more than 1 public class it would be difficult to select for compiler that what should be the name of Class file.

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I think it should be "there can only be one NON-STATIC top level public class per .java file". Isn't it?

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There can only be one public class per .java file, as public classes must have the same name as the source file.

The purpose of including multiple classes in one source file is to bundle related support functionality (internal data structures, support classes, etc) together with the main public class. Note that it is always ok not to do this -- the only effect is on the readability (or not) of your code.

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Varies... One such example would be an anonymous classes (you'll encounter those alot when using event listeners and such).

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Yes it can,but there can only be 1 public class inside any package as java compiler creates the .Class file which is of the same name as the Public class name therefore if their are more than 1 public class it would be difficult to select for compiler that what should be the name of Class file.

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A .java file is called a compilation unit. Each compilation unit may contain any number of top-level classes and interfaces. If there are no public top-level types then the compilation unit can be named anything.

//Multiple.java
//preceding package and import statements

class MyClass{...}
interface Service{...}
...
//No public classes or interfaces
...

There can be only one public class/interface in a compilation unit. The c.u. must be named exactly as this public top-level type.

//Test.java
//named exactly as the public class Test
public class Test{...}
//!public class Operations{...}
interface Selector{...}
...
//Other non-public classes/interfaces

click here for the full post

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