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If I run a query like this:

insert into table (unique_id, column) 
select 
(isnull(max(cast(unique_id as int)), 1) + 1 from table) as id, 
another_column
from another_table

the unique_id field always comes out as 1 and doesn't increment. Is there a way to have this increment whilst doing the insert?

p.s This is a simple version of what I am doing but the example is accurate

Edit: SQL Server 2008

Thanks

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Seriously: just use an INT IDENTITY column - that'll save you sooo much hassle and grief which is totally not worth it. –  marc_s Mar 13 '12 at 13:11
    
This is a 10 year old program with about 200 tables in. Although I would prefer it, it's not possible :) –  webnoob Mar 13 '12 at 13:18
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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

use identity(mssql), auto_increment(mysql) or sequences (psql/oracle/any other proper DB).

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I know I can use identity but I wanted to see if it is possible in line with my SQL? –  webnoob Mar 13 '12 at 12:57
    
@webnoob I don't think you can do it in your way. The max(unique_id) (and any other similar expressions) is calculated once, before inserting any data. This is how it must work, you cannot change it. –  kan Mar 13 '12 at 13:22
    
I figured as much. Thanks for the clarification. –  webnoob Mar 13 '12 at 13:25
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For mssql 2005+

insert into [table] (unique_id, [column])  
select  row_number() over (order by another_column) as id,  
another_column from another_table 

or

insert into [table] (unique_id, [column])  
select  row_number() over (order by newid()) as id,  
another_column from another_table 
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What would happen if the table already had values in with ID's though? Wouldn't I end up with duplicate IDs? –  webnoob Mar 13 '12 at 13:06
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Take a look at the ROW_NUMBER() function.

INSERT INTO [table] (unique_id, [column])
SELECT      ROW_NUMBER() OVER ( ORDER BY another_column ) AS id,
            another_column
FROM        another_table 

Here's a working example that you can play with.

Note: This does not ensure that the ID you're generating using ROW_NUMBER() is unique within the table that you're inserting into.

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What would happen if the table already had values in with ID's though? Wouldn't I end up with duplicate IDs? –  webnoob Mar 13 '12 at 13:05
    
Yes, it would certainly duplicate the ID's (or generate an error based on a constraint). –  James Hill Mar 13 '12 at 13:10
    
Ok, looks like I need to use Identity then. Thanks. –  webnoob Mar 13 '12 at 13:11
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