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I'm building a Rails 3 gem that essentially modifies the records returned from an ActiveRecord query. One of the things I'm doing is overriding the method_missing and respond_to? methods, but it seems that my respond_to? definition is resulting in an infinite loop that is throwing a "SystemStackError: stack level too deep" error.

Here are my original definitions of these methods:

def respond_to?(name, *args)
  super(name, *args) || parent_association.respond_to?(name)
end

def method_missing(name, *args, &block)
  if parent_association.respond_to?(name)
    parent_association.send(name, *args, &block)
  else
    super(name, *args, &block)
  end
end

def parent_association
  send(parent_association_name)  # Essentially yields another ActiveRecord
                                 # instance (e.g.: instance of User), but
                                 # never returns itself.
end

In trying to learn why this infinite loop was occurring, I restructured respond_to? with some "before" and "after" output to see where it's getting stuck.

def respond_to?(name, *args)
  return true if super(name, *args)
  puts "before (#{name})"
  result = parent_association.respond_to?(name)
  puts "after"
  result
end

When running, it appears that various callbacks and attribute methods run as expected, with a single before and after call for each:

before (_run__374051839217347232__initialize__1707831318230746190__callbacks)
after
before (_run__374051839217347232__validation__1707831318230746190__callbacks)
after
before (_run__374051839217347232__validate__1707831318230746190__callbacks)
after
before (_run__374051839217347232__save__1707831318230746190__callbacks)
after
before (_run__374051839217347232__create__1707831318230746190__callbacks)
after
before (created_at)
after
before (created_on)
after
...

However, any time I see a find callback, that appears to be caught in an infinite loop:

before (_run__374051839217347232__find__1707831318230746190__callbacks)
before (_run__374051839217347232__find__1707831318230746190__callbacks)
before (_run__374051839217347232__find__1707831318230746190__callbacks)
before (_run__374051839217347232__find__1707831318230746190__callbacks)
before (_run__374051839217347232__find__1707831318230746190__callbacks)
before (_run__374051839217347232__find__1707831318230746190__callbacks)
before (_run__374051839217347232__find__1707831318230746190__callbacks)
before (_run__374051839217347232__find__1707831318230746190__callbacks)
...
SystemStackError: stack level too deep

If I hack my respond_to?, then everything appears to run smoothly:

def respond_to?(name, *args)
  return true if super(name, *args)
  return false if name =~ /^_run_.*_find_.*_callbacks$/
  parent_association.respond_to?(name)
end

What am I doing wrong that I seem to need this hack? And how can I avoid it?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The issue ended up being this function:

def parent_association
  send(parent_association_name)  # Essentially yields another ActiveRecord
                                 # instance (e.g.: instance of User), but
                                 # never returns itself.
end

The variable parent_association_name is something like employee, which is defined via something like:

belongs_to :employee

Because employee is not defined on the model instance until AFTER the find callback executes, and because I was first calling respond_to? in a spot BEFORE the find callback is being called (in code no included in my original question), the call to send(parent_assocation_name) was causing a recursive call to respond_to?.

share|improve this answer
    
It would be clearer if you used precise language. parent_association_name is not a variable, and I think employee is always defined, although it might not be loaded. Not sure you actually mean "callback" either. I'm still not sure how what you are describing is not what I was saying, nor how you fixed it. –  Marc-André Lafortune Apr 9 '12 at 20:05

If parent_association returns a new AR object, it will also inherits your hack, so calling respond_to? on it will call your respond_to?, which will create a AR new object, etc...

share|improve this answer
    
That's not true if the other ActiveRecord object that it creates actually implements the method, which should be the case here. For example, the other AR object will have a method like .name (due to the attributes implemented), which the original AR object might not have had. At some point, it's just going to call super and return since the method is actually defined on the object. –  Matt Huggins Mar 13 '12 at 14:46
    
Just to follow up, it did end up being recursion via respond_to?, but it wasn't an issue of the function being called being undefined recursively on separate AR objects, as you mentioned. –  Matt Huggins Apr 9 '12 at 19:22

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