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I'm trying to optimize an algorithm (Lattice Boltzmann) for parallel computing using C++ AMP. And looking for some suggestions to optimize the memory layout, just found out that removing one parameter from the structure into another vector (the blocked vector) gave and increase of about 10%.

Anyone got any tips that can further improve this, or something i should take into consideration? Below is the most time consuming function that is executed for each timestep, and the structure used for the layout.

struct grid_cell {
//  int blocked;    // Define if blocked
    float n;        // North
    float ne;       // North-East
    float e;        // East
    float se;       // South-East
    float s;
    float sw;
    float w;
    float nw;
    float c;        // Center
};

int collision(const struct st_parameters param, vector<struct grid_cell> &node, vector<struct grid_cell> &tmp_node, vector<int> &obstacle) {
    int x,y;
    int i = 0;
    float c_sq = 1.0f/3.0f;     // Square of speed of sound
    float w0 = 4.0f/9.0f;       // Weighting factors
    float w1 = 1.0f/9.0f;
    float w2 = 1.0f/36.0f;

    int chunk = param.ny/20;
    float total_density = 0;

    float u_x,u_y;              // Avrage velocities in x and y direction
    float u[9];                 // Directional velocities
    float d_equ[9];             // Equalibrium densities
    float u_sq;                 // Squared velocity
    float local_density;        // Sum of densities in a particular node

    for(y=0;y<param.ny;y++) {
        for(x=0;x<param.nx;x++) {
            i = y*param.nx + x; // Node index
            // Dont consider blocked cells
            if (obstacle[i] == 0) {
                // Calculate local density
                local_density = 0.0;
                local_density += tmp_node[i].n;
                local_density += tmp_node[i].e;
                local_density += tmp_node[i].s;
                local_density += tmp_node[i].w;
                local_density += tmp_node[i].ne;
                local_density += tmp_node[i].se;
                local_density += tmp_node[i].sw;
                local_density += tmp_node[i].nw;
                local_density += tmp_node[i].c;

                // Calculate x velocity component
                u_x = (tmp_node[i].e + tmp_node[i].ne + tmp_node[i].se - 
                      (tmp_node[i].w + tmp_node[i].nw + tmp_node[i].sw)) 
                      / local_density;
                // Calculate y velocity component
                u_y = (tmp_node[i].n + tmp_node[i].ne + tmp_node[i].nw - 
                      (tmp_node[i].s + tmp_node[i].sw + tmp_node[i].se)) 
                      / local_density;
                // Velocity squared
                u_sq = u_x*u_x +u_y*u_y;

                // Directional velocity components;
                u[1] =  u_x;        // East
                u[2] =        u_y;  // North
                u[3] = -u_x;        // West
                u[4] =      - u_y;  // South
                u[5] =  u_x + u_y;  // North-East
                u[6] = -u_x + u_y;  // North-West
                u[7] = -u_x - u_y;  // South-West
                u[8] =  u_x - u_y;  // South-East

                // Equalibrium densities
                // Zero velocity density: weight w0
                d_equ[0] = w0 * local_density * (1.0f - u_sq / (2.0f * c_sq));
                // Axis speeds: weight w1
                d_equ[1] = w1 * local_density * (1.0f + u[1] / c_sq
                                 + (u[1] * u[1]) / (2.0f * c_sq * c_sq)
                                 - u_sq / (2.0f * c_sq));
                d_equ[2] = w1 * local_density * (1.0f + u[2] / c_sq
                                 + (u[2] * u[2]) / (2.0f * c_sq * c_sq)
                                 - u_sq / (2.0f * c_sq));
                d_equ[3] = w1 * local_density * (1.0f + u[3] / c_sq
                                 + (u[3] * u[3]) / (2.0f * c_sq * c_sq)
                                 - u_sq / (2.0f * c_sq));
                d_equ[4] = w1 * local_density * (1.0f + u[4] / c_sq
                                 + (u[4] * u[4]) / (2.0f * c_sq * c_sq)
                                 - u_sq / (2.0f * c_sq));
                // Diagonal speeds: weight w2
                d_equ[5] = w2 * local_density * (1.0f + u[5] / c_sq
                                 + (u[5] * u[5]) / (2.0f * c_sq * c_sq)
                                 - u_sq / (2.0f * c_sq));
                d_equ[6] = w2 * local_density * (1.0f + u[6] / c_sq
                                 + (u[6] * u[6]) / (2.0f * c_sq * c_sq)
                                 - u_sq / (2.0f * c_sq));
                d_equ[7] = w2 * local_density * (1.0f + u[7] / c_sq
                                 + (u[7] * u[7]) / (2.0f * c_sq * c_sq)
                                 - u_sq / (2.0f * c_sq));
                d_equ[8] = w2 * local_density * (1.0f + u[8] / c_sq
                                 + (u[8] * u[8]) / (2.0f * c_sq * c_sq)
                                 - u_sq / (2.0f * c_sq));

                // Relaxation step
                node[i].c = (tmp_node[i].c + param.omega * (d_equ[0] - tmp_node[i].c));
                node[i].e = (tmp_node[i].e + param.omega * (d_equ[1] - tmp_node[i].e));
                node[i].n = (tmp_node[i].n + param.omega * (d_equ[2] - tmp_node[i].n));
                node[i].w = (tmp_node[i].w + param.omega * (d_equ[3] - tmp_node[i].w));
                node[i].s = (tmp_node[i].s + param.omega * (d_equ[4] - tmp_node[i].s));
                node[i].ne = (tmp_node[i].ne + param.omega * (d_equ[5] - tmp_node[i].ne));
                node[i].nw = (tmp_node[i].nw + param.omega * (d_equ[6] - tmp_node[i].nw));
                node[i].sw = (tmp_node[i].sw + param.omega * (d_equ[7] - tmp_node[i].sw));
                node[i].se = (tmp_node[i].se + param.omega * (d_equ[8] - tmp_node[i].se));
            }
        }
    }
    return 1;
}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Current GPUs are notoriously depending about memory layout. Without more details about your application here are some things I would suggest you explore:

  1. Unit-stride access is very important so GPUs prefer “structs of arrays” to “arrays of structures”. As you did moving field “blocked” into vector “obstacle”, it should be advantageous to convert all of the fields of “grid_cell” into separate vectors. This should show benefit on CPU as well for loops that don’t access all of the fields.

  2. If “obstacle” is very sparse (which I guess is unlikely) then moving it to its own vector is particularly value. GPUs like CPUs will load more than one word from the memory system either in cache lines or some other form and you waste bandwidth when you don’t need some of the data. For many system memory bandwidth is the bottleneck resource so any way to reduce bandwidth helps.

  3. This is more speculative, but now that you are writing all of the output vector, it is possible the memory subsystem is avoiding reading values in “node” that will simply be overwritten

  4. On some systems, the on-chip memory is split into banks and having an odd number of fields within your structure may help remove bank conflicts.

  5. Some systems will also “vectorize” loads and stores so again removing “blocked” from the structure might enable more vectorization. The shift to struct-of-arrays mitigates this worry.

Thanks for your interest in C++ AMP.

David Callahan

http://blogs.msdn.com/b/nativeconcurrency/ C++ AMP Team Blog

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In general, you should make sure that data used on different cpus are not shared (easy) and are not on the same cache line (false sharing, see for example here: False Sharing is No Fun). Data used by the same cpu should be close together to benefit from caches.

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Some small generic tops:

  • Any data structure that is shared across multiple processors should be read only.

  • Any data structure that requires modification is unique to the processor and does not share memory locality with data that is required by another processor.

  • Make sure your memory is arranged so that your code scans serially through it (not taking huge steps or jumping around).

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