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I think I'm probably missing something obvious here, so please enlighten me.

Currently I'm reading a CSV file into perl using Text::CSV and it's 'parse' method (outlined below).

csv->parse method:

while (<FILE>) {
  if ($csv->parse($_)) {
     my @columns = $csv->fields();
     'refer to items with: $columns[1]'
  }
  else {
     'Handle the parse error here'
  }
}

I'm now looking for a way to read these values into a hash instead of an array. Going through the Text::CSV documentation it seems the most efficient way to do this is by using the 'getline' method (Outlined below), but I'm unsure how to catch errors in a similar manner to the way they are caught using the array approach.

csv->getline method:

my @cols = ("col1", "col2", "col3");
my $item = {};
$csv->bind_columns( \@{$item}{@cols} );
while( $csv->getline($it_fh) ) {
  'refer to items using: $item->{col1}'
}

Any hints/tips/links would be great, as my Googleing seems to have come up empty?

EDIT: So here's my understanding of the answer I've accepted, just to clarify what I understand as the fault tolerance of this method.

$csv->column_names( qw(col1 col2 col3) );
my $line;
until ( eof(FILE) ) {
    $line++;
    my $item = $csv->getline_hr( \*FILE );
    if ( $item ) {
        # refer to items as $item->{col1}
    } else {
        my $err = "Line: " . $line . "failed to parse\n"
        . "Input: " . $csv->error_input . "\n"
        . "Error: " . $csv->error_diag . "\n";
        print STDERR $err;
    }
}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Well, there's always the straightforward approach:

my @cols = qw(col1 col2 col3);

while ( <FILE> ) {
   if ( $csv->parse($_) ) {
       my %item;
       @item{@cols} = $csv->fields();
       # refer to items using $item{col1}
   }
   else {
       # handle the parse error here
   }
}

However, I suspect that the following may be a bit more efficient, at least if using the XS implementation of Text::CSV:

$csv->column_names( qw(col1 col2 col3) );

until ( eof(FILE) ) {
    my $item = $csv->getline_hr( \*FILE );
    if ( $item ) {
        # refer to items as $item->{col1}
    } else {
        # handle the parse error here
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Cheers Ilmari, your second example is exactly the sort of thing I was looking for, I just hadn't quite figured how to put it all together. –  Ashimema Mar 13 '12 at 15:35

The proper usage of Text::CSV_XS is

use Text::CSV_XS qw( );

my $csv = Text::CSV_XS->new({ binary => 1 });

open my $fh, "<:encoding(UTF-8)", $qfn)
   or die("Can't open \"$qfn\": $!\n");

$csv->column_names(qw( col1 col2 col3 ));

while (my $row = $csv->getline_hr($fh)) {
  ...
}

$csv->eof()
   or die("CSV error processing \"$qfn\": ".($csv->error_diag())."\n");

The previously posted version hid errors for no benefit.

If the CSV file has a header row, you can use the following:

my $header = $csv->getline($fh)
   or die("No header\n");
$csv->column_names(@$header);
share|improve this answer
    
I think I'm missing something again here, how is the previously posted version hiding errors? Could you elaborate? –  Ashimema Mar 13 '12 at 18:02
    
@Ashimema, Most if not all of the reading from disk is done by eof in Ilmari Karonen's code, but there's no error checking if eof encountered an error. I'm not clear on how one does check for errors. Does eof return false on error, and then returns the error on read? If so, no errors are hidden. It is convoluted, though. Why go to the trouble of prematurely checking for EOF (and causing these concerns) instead of letting Text::CSV_XS let you know it has reached EOF? And it actually makes the code longer to ignore the recommended fashion of doing it. –  ikegami Mar 13 '12 at 21:58
    
@Ashimema, (7 vs 5 lines) –  ikegami Mar 14 '12 at 4:06
    
I see your point now... Correct me if I'm wrong, but does your implementation not parse the file one line at a time and then die when it comes across a troubled line? I think the other method also parses a file one line at a time, but reports errors if a line fails but continues onto the next line without dieing? –  Ashimema Mar 14 '12 at 9:41
    
@ashimema, His possibly attempts to do that, but we've already covered that it's buggy. Is that what you want? Secondly, it's generally a bug to parse a file a line at at time, because a field could span more than one line. –  ikegami Mar 16 '12 at 1:01

You want Text::CSV::Slurp. From its docs:

 use Text::CSV::Slurp;

 my $data = Text::CSV::Slurp->load(file       => $filename   [,%options]);
 my $data = Text::CSV::Slurp->load(filehandle => $filehandle [,%options]);
 my $data = Text::CSV::Slurp->load(string     => $string     [,%options]);

$data is now an arrayref of hashrefs.

Edit: I missed that the point of the question is probably the error handling. I don't think it performs any extra validation out of the box.

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