Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am doing some CPU performance related tasks. And while doing I came to know that CPU load depends highly on processor queue(waiting queue).

Is there a way to determine the maximum length of the processor queue? I want to know how many processes can be in a waiting state at one instant.

I am using Intel i5 processor with Unix environment.

share|improve this question
1  
'CPU load depends highly on processor queue', well, kind of. Assuming that 'processor queue' refers to the set of ready threads that are not running, the overall CPU load is 100% if the queue count is greater than 0. Note that ready threads are not usually described as 'waiting', even though they are waiting for CPU. 'Waiting' is normally understood as 'not runnable', ie. waiting for a non-CPU resource like IO or a synchronization object. –  Martin James Mar 13 '12 at 14:36
    
Oh! Sorry for typo error then. I actually want to know the maximum allowable 'runnable' processes at one instant. Is it possible to find? –  bobby Mar 14 '12 at 13:18
    
An easy way is to try it. Create loopy threads at a low priority until something breaks, (save your work:). –  Martin James Mar 15 '12 at 9:40

1 Answer 1

nr_running() is the function which returns the current sum of runnable processes on all online CPUs. I am not sure what you mean by maximum allowable? If one process is running on a CPU, theoretically all other processes can be in runnable state. There is no cap on this as such. ( There is a cap on the maximum number of processes on the system though. It was 512 in older linux kernels. But definitely much more in the latest ones )

If you are interested in learning about CPU loads, the I would suggest you to go through this article and also load calculating functions inside the kernel such as calc_load() and others in sched.c

Processor Run Queue can be examined through commands as in here

How to find the processor queue length in linux

Also learn more about runqueues here

http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/linux/library/l-scheduler/

Hope this gives you a head start into CPU load estimation.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.